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Edited by Trude Haugli, Anna Nylund, Randi Sigurdsen and Lena R.L. Bendiksen

The book presents a comparative study of children’s constitutional rights in Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden. The authors discuss the value of enshrining children’s rights in national constitutions in addition to implementing the Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC). Central issues are whether enshrining children’s rights in the Constitution improves implementation and enforcement of those rights by providing advocacy tools and by mandating courts, legislators, policy-makers and practitioners to take children’s rights seriously. The study assesses whether the Nordic constitutions are in line with the child rights approach of the CRC both on a general level and in detail in three domains; the best interests of the child, participation rights, and the right to respect for family life.
The New Zealand Yearbook of International Law, launched in 2004, is an annual, internationally refereed publication intended to stand as a reference point for legal materials and commentary on public international law generally and with particular emphasis on issues concerning New Zealand, Antarctica and the Southern Ocean, including critical writing in those areas. It boasts an exceptional Advisory Board consisting of leading national and international academics and practitioners who are called upon to provide input through the double blind refereeing process used to assure the quality of the submissions published in each volume. The Yearbook also serves as a valuable tool in the determination of trends, state practice and policies in the development of international law in New Zealand, the Southern Ocean and Antarctica and seeks to generate scholarship in those fields. In this regard the Yearbook contains an annual ‘Year-in-Review’ of developments in international law of particular interest to New Zealand. Equally so, New Zealand offers a unique environment, owing to its size, population and strategic proximity to the Southern Ocean, Antarctica, and the South Pacific, that makes the New Zealand Yearbook of general interest to the international community. It is for the latter reason that the Yearbook contains a section dedicated to the ‘The South Pacific’.

Series:

Cyril Laucci

Le Code annoté de la Cour pénale internationale (2009) est le quatrième volume d’une collection annuelle. Il propose une sélection des extraits les plus pertinents des décisions publiques rendues par la Cour en 2009. La collection de Codes annotés est conçue comme un outil de référence à l’attention des praticiens du droit pénal international et des universitaires.

The Code annoté de la Cour pénale internationale (2009) is the fourth volume of the French version of the annual series Annotated Digests. It compiles most significant findings issued by the Court in 2009. The Code annoté / Annotated Digests series constitutes a reference tool for practitioners of International Criminal Law and academics.

Mass Atrocities, Risk and Resilience

Rethinking Prevention

Edited by Stephen McLoughlin

Mass Atrocities, Risk and Resilience examines the relationship between risk and resilience in the prevention of genocide and other mass atrocities and explores two broad areas of neglect. In terms of prevention, there is very little research that analyzes how local and national actors manage the risk associated with mass atrocities. In the field of comparative genocide studies, to date there has been very little interest in examining negative cases. Although much is known about why mass atrocities occur, much less is established about why they do not occur. The contributions in this book address this neglect in two important ways. First, they challenge commonly-accepted approaches to prevention. Second, they explore negative cases in order to better understand how local and national actors have mitigated risk over time.

Shielding Humanity

Essays in International Law in Honour of Judge Abdul G. Koroma

Edited by Charles Chernor Jalloh and Olufemi Elias

On the contemporary international law scene, there are not many jurists who match the eminence and stature of Abdul G. Koroma. A distinguished lawyer, diplomat and member of the International Law Commission for many years, he has been a key figure in the elaboration, codification and negotiation of important multilateral treaties in diverse areas of international law. He subsequently served, for 18 years, on the bench of the International Court of Justice (ICJ) where he participated in deciding many of the Court’s leading cases during the busiest periods of its history. These outstanding essays, written by renowned judges, scholars and practitioners of international law in honour of Judge Koroma, discuss both classical and contemporary topics of significant relevance to the current and future of international law. The volume will appeal to anyone interested in the ICJ, peaceful settlement of inter-state disputes, law of the sea, international criminal law, international humanitarian law, regional integration and Africa’s contributions to international law.

Contributors are: Avitus A Agbor, Babefemi Akinrinade, Adejoké Babington-Ashaye, Laurence Boisson de Chazournes, Tamara Cummings-John, John Dugard, Olufemi Elias, Sir Christopher Greenwood, Chikeziri Igwe, Osman Keh Kamara, Charles Manga Fombad, Madeline Choe-Amusimo Fombad, Charles Chernor Jalloh, Kenneth Keith, Tommy Koh, Tiyanjana Maluwa, Konstantinos D. Magliveras, Brian McGarry, Andrew Morgan, Gino J. Naldi, Lydia A. Nkansah, Vincent O. Nmehielle, Karin Oellers-Frahm, Olajumoke O. Oduwole, Obiora Chinedu Okafor, Phoebe Okowa, Adetola Onayemi, Pemmaraju Sreenivasa Rao, Bernardo Sepúlveda-Amor, Surya P. Subedi, Mia Swart, Abdul Tejan-Cole, Manuel J. Ventura, Sienho Yee, and Abdulqawi A. Yusuf.

Series:

Sigrid Mehring

Although working on the sidelines of armed conflicts, physicians are often at the centre of attention. First Do No harm: Medical Ethics in International Humanitarian Law was born from the occasionally controversial role of physicians in recent armed conflicts and the legal and ethical rules that frame their actions. While international humanitarian, human rights and criminal law provide a framework of rights and obligations that bind physicians in armed conflicts, the reference to ‘medical ethics’ in the laws of armed conflict adds an extra-legal layer. In analysing both the legal and the ethical framework for physicians in armed conflict, the book is invaluable to practitioners and legal scholars alike.

An Introduction to the Law of International Criminal Tribunals

A Comparative Study. Second Revised Edition

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Geert-Jan Knoops

In An Introduction to the Law of International Criminal Tribunals Geert-Jan Alexander Knoops offers an overview of the basic topics in international criminal law (ICL).

It discusses main characteristics of International Criminal Tribunals (ICTs), as well as definitions of international crimes. The book will delve into issues of jurisdiction and complementarity, liability principles and specialized defences. Other topics are: due process rights, evidence, trials in absentia and State cooperation. A new chapter is devoted to the geopolitical effects of international criminal prosecutions.

The second revised edition includes a chapter on the “new” crime of aggression and is updated with the most recent developments in ICL. The book is essential to everyone becoming familiar with the basic topics and challenges within ICL.

Edited by Jonas Ebbesson, Marie Jacobsson, Mark Adam Klamberg, David Langlet and Pål Wrange

The traditional conception of security as national security against military threats has changed radically since the adoption of the UN Charter in 1945. The perceived nature and sources of threats have been widened as well as the objects of protection, now including individuals, societies, the environment as such and the whole globe. In International Law and Changing Perceptions of Security the contributors reflect on whether and how changing concepts and conceptions of security have affected different fields of international law, such as the use of force, the law of the sea, human rights, international environmental law and international humanitarian law.

The authors of this book have been inspired by Professor Said Mahmoudi to which this Liber Amoricum is dedicated.

Series:

Various Authors & Editors

Amnesty's Country Dossiers (1975- ) and Publications (1962- ).

Collection of documents from Amnesty International's Research Archives, containing Amnesty's Country Dossiers and Publications since 1975 and 1962, respectively, updated on a yearly basis. The reports and dossiers contain a variety of information on each country, sifted from published studies, contemporary archives, and press reports in all media. Legislation pertaining to the administration of justice in each country is quoted from official publications. Also included are interviews with former prisoners and government representatives, as well as reports of on-the-spot investigations of prisons.

MARC21 collection record available

Amnesty International receives 30% of the revenues from this publication.

The Concept of Group Rights in International Law

Groups as Contested Right-Holders, Subjects and Legal Persons

Series:

Corsin Bisaz

The Concept of Group Rights in International Law offers a critical appraisal of the concept of group rights in international law on the basis of an extensive survey of existing group rights in contemporary international law. Among some of its findings is the observation that an ideological way of arguing about this legal category is widespread
among scholars as well as practitioners; it sees this ideological framing as one of the main reasons why international law has so far been very reluctant to provide group rights and to call them by their name. Accordingly, the book re-evaluates the concept based on the experience with existing group rights in international law and pleads for a more pragmatic approach. Despite limitations with the concept, the overall thesis is that there is a role for group rights as a pragmatic tool allowing for a principled approach to substate groups through international law. Such an approach could turn group rights into an arguably minor, but nevertheless, highly relevant legal category of international law.