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This volume contains an English translation of the Arabic translation and commentary on the book of Proverbs composed by one of the most acclaimed, innovative, and prolific exegetes of the Karaite “Golden Age” (10th –11th centuries), Yefet ben ʿEli ha-Levi. A critical edition and an extensive introduction was published by Ilana Sasson as vol. 1 (KTS 8) in 2016. Dr. Sasson worked for many years on an English translation of the work and, before her untimely death in 2017, passed her unfinished manuscript to the series editors. The translation was then completed, edited, and prepared for publication by Dr. Wechsler. Yefet’s commentary on Proverbs is a masterpiece of literary and rational-contextual analysis of one of the most difficult and important books of wisdom in the Hebrew Bible. His work is an invaluable link in the history of interpretation of the book of Proverbs.
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ضمن كتاب من تريبوليتانيا إلى أطرابلس، يتناول حافظ عبدولي مسألة انتقال إقليم/كورة طرابلس الغرب من الفترة القديمة المتأخرة إلى الفترة الإسلامية المبكّرة. وذلك وفق مقاربة منهجية تقوم من جهة على مقارعة المعطيات التي توفّرها مختلف المصادر الأدبيّة مع نظيرتها الطوبونيميّة والأونومستكية والأثرية ومن جهة أخرى تعتمد تشبيك المناهج المتنوّعة.
وقد خلص باعتماد هذا المنهج إلى نتائج مجدّدة تستند إلى براهين علميّة تؤكّد – على خلاف ما كان شائعا – أنّ المرور من تريبوليتانيا اللاتينية-المسيحيّة إلى أطرابلس العربية-الإسلامية لم يكن بصفة فجائية عبر إحداث قطيعة فوريّة وهوّة فاصلة بين الفترتين القديمة والوسيطة، بل كان كما الحال في بقيّة مجالات بلاد المغرب تدريجيّا وبطيئا في كل المستويات الحضارية. وقد كانت المسائل المتعلّقة بتفسير كيفية حدوث هذا الانتقال والآليات التي حكمته وانعكاس ذلك على تشكّل المشهد التعميري خلال العصر الوسيط المتقدّم، من أهمّ الهواجس المعرفية التي حاول الكتاب الإجابة عنها.

In From Tripolitania to Tripoli, Hafed Abdouli deals with the transition of Tripolitania from late Antiquity to the early Islamic period. He compares a detailed analysis of all the literary sources with the evaluation of the archaeological, onomastic and toponymic findings. For this purpose, he makes use of various research methodologies.
This approach brings about new results. It confirms that — contrary to what has been so far commonly assumed — the transition from the Latin-Christian Tripolitania to the Arabic-Islamic Tripoli was not sudden. There was no rigorous break that seperated the ancient from the medieval period. On the contrary, as was also the case in the rest of the Maghreb, the transition was progressive and slow at all levels of civilization. The interpretation of how this transition occurred, the mechanisms that determined it, and its reflection on the urban landscape during the early medieval period, are among the most important epistemological concerns that this book tries to answer.
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Arab Traders in their Own Words explores for the first time the largest unified corpus of merchant correspondence to have survived from the Ottoman period. The writers chosen for this first volume were mostly Christian merchants who traded within a network that connected the Syrian and Egyptian provinces and extended from Damascus in the North to Alexandria in the South with particular centers in Jerusalem and Damietta. They lived through one of the most turbulent intersections of Ottoman and European imperial history, the 1790s and early 1800s, and had to navigate their fortunes through diplomacy, culture, and commerce. Besides an edition of more than 190 letters in colloquial Arabic this volume also offers a profound introductory study.
Connected and decompartmentalised perspectives from the Middle East and North Africa (19th-21st century)
Based on a connected, relational and multidisciplinary approach (history, ethnography, political science, and theology), Mission and Preaching tackles the notion of mission through the analysis of preaching activities and religious dynamics across Christianity, Islam and Judaism, in the Middle East and North Africa, from the late 19th century until today. The 13 chapters reveal points of contact, exchange, and circulation, considering the MENA region as a central observatory. The volume offers a new chronology of the missionary phenomenon and calls for further cross-cutting approaches to decompartmentalise it, arguing that these approaches constitute useful entry points to shed new light on religious dynamics and social transformations in the MENA region.

Contributors
Necati Alkan, Federico Alpi, Gabrielle Angey, Armand Aupiais, Katia Boissevain, Naima Bouras, Philippe Bourmaud, Gaetan du Roy, Séverine Gabry-Thienpont, Maria-Chiara Giorda, Bernard Heyberger, Emir Mahieddin, Michael Marten, Norig Neveu, Maria Chiara Rioli, Karène Sanchez Summerer, Heather Sharkey, Ester Sigillò, Sébastien Tank Storper, Emanuela Trevisan Semi, Annalaura Turiano and Vincent Vilmain.
Volume Editors: and
Baghdād: From its Beginnings to the 14th Century offers an exhaustive handbook that covers all possible themes connected to the history of this urban complex in Iraq, from its origins rooted in late antique Mesopotamia up to the aftermath of the Mongol invasion in 1258.
Against the common perception of a city founded 762 in a vacuum, which, after experiencing a heyday in a mythical “golden age” under the early ʿAbbāsids, entered since 900 a long period of decline that ended with a complete collapse by savage people from the East in 1258, the volume emphasizes the continuity of Baghdād’s urban life, and shows how it was marked by its destiny as caliphal seat and cultural hub.

Contributors
Mehmetcan Akpınar, Nuha Alshaar, Pavel Basharin, David Bennett, Michal Biran, Richard W. Bulliet, Kirill Dmitriev, Desmond Durkin-Meisterernst, Hend Gilli-Elewy, Beatrice Gruendler, Sebastian Günther, Olof Heilo, Damien Janos, Christopher Melchert, Michael Morony, Bernard O’Kane, Klaus Oschema, Letizia Osti, Parvaneh Pourshariati, Vanessa van Renterghem, Jens Scheiner, Angela Schottenhammer, Y. Zvi Stampfer, Johannes Thomann, Isabel Toral.
A Palestinian Life (1885-1954)
'The House of the Priest’ presents and discusses the hitherto unpublished and untranslated memoirs of Niqula Khoury, a senior member of the Orthodox Church and Arab nationalist in late Ottoman and British Mandate Palestine. It discusses the complicated relationships between language, religion, diplomacy and identity in the Middle East in the interwar period. This original annotated translation and accompanying articles provide a thorough explication of Khoury’s memoirs and their significance for the social, political and religious histories of twentieth-century Palestine and Arab relations with the Greek Orthodox church. Khoury played a major role in these dynamics as a leading member of the fight for Arab presence in the Greek-dominated clergy, and for an independent Palestine, travelling in 1937 to Eastern Europe and the League of Nations on behalf of the national movement.

Contributors: Sarah Irving, Charbel Nassif, Konstantinos Papastathis, Karène Sanchez Summerer, Cyrus Schayegh
Ethnohistoire d’une hétérotopie au Caire (979-2021)
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Les éboueurs du Caire (les Zabbalin) se sont installés sur les pentes du Muqattam en 1970. Très vite, ils ont attiré l’attention de nombreux acteurs actifs dans le développement ou la mission religieuse : des ingénieurs égyptiens, une sœur catholique Française, et le personnage central de cette histoire, le père Samʿān, qui se lança dans une mission auprès des Zabbalin en 1974. Ce prêcheur fonda plusieurs églises connues aujourd’hui sous le nom du monastère de Saint-Samʿan-le-Tanneur, un complexe de sept sanctuaires taillés dans les falaises du Muqattam. A travers son style charismatique et ses exorcismes publics mettant en scène une lutte symbolique entre Islam et Christianisme, Samʿān est devenu l’une des figures de proue de son Eglise.

The Cairene garbage collectors (the Zabbalin) settled on the Muqattam slopes in 1970. Soon they attracted the attention of different actors involved in development and religious mission: Egyptian engineers, a French Catholic Sister and the most central character of this story, Father Samʿān, who started a mission among the Zabbalin in 1974. This preacher founded several churches, today known as the Monastery of Saint Samʿān the Tanner, a complex of seven churches carved in the Muqattam walls. Through his charismatic style of preaching and his public exorcisms symbolically staging the struggle between Christianity and Islam, Samʿān has become a figurehead of his church.
Manuscripts, Versions, and Transmission
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In this study, Vevian Zaki places the Arabic versions of the Pauline Epistles in their historical context, exploring when, where, and how they were produced, transmitted, understood, and adapted among Eastern Christian communities across the centuries. She also considers the transmission and use of these texts among Muslim polemicists, as well as European missionaries and scholars. Underpinning the study is a close investigation of the manuscripts and a critical examination of their variant readings. The work concludes with a case study: an edition and translation of the Epistle to the Philippians from manuscripts London, BL, Or. 8612 and Vatican, BAV, Ar. 13; a comparison of the translation strategies employed in these two versions; and an investigation of the possible relations between them.
This volume sheds light on the historical background and political circumstances that encouraged the dialogue between Eastern-European Christians and Arabic-speaking Christians of the Middle East in Ottoman times, as well as the means employed in pursuing this dialogue for several centuries. The ties that connected Eastern European Christianity with Arabic-speaking Christians in the 16th-19th centuries are the focus of this book. Contributors address the Arabic-speaking hierarchs’ and scholars’ connections with patriarchs and rulers of Constantinople, the Romanian Principalities, Kyiv, and the Tsardom of Moscow, the circulation of literature, models, iconography, and knowhow between the Middle East and Eastern Europe, and research dedicated to them by Eastern European scholars.

Contributors are Stefano Di Pietrantonio, Ioana Feodorov, Serge Frantsouzoff, Bernard Heyberger, Elena Korovtchenko, Sofia Melikyan, Charbel Nassif, Constantin A. Panchenko, Yulia Petrova, Vera Tchentsova, Mihai Ţipău and Carsten Walbiner.
Volume Editors: and
The New Companion to the Libro de buen amor provides a platform for exploring current, innovative approaches to this classic poem. It is designed for specialists and non-specialists from a variety of fields, who are interested in investigating different aspects of Juan Ruiz’s poem and developing fruitful new paths for future research. Chapters in the volume show how the book engages with Christian, Jewish and Muslim cultures, and delve into its legacy in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Part One sheds light on intersecting cultural milieux, from the Christian court of Castile, to the experience of Jewish and Muslim communities. Part Two illustrates how the poem’s meaning through time can be elucidated using an array of theoretical and interdisciplinary approaches.
Contributors are Nora C. Benedict, Erik Ekman, Denise K. Filios, Ryan D. Giles, Michelle Hamilton, Carlos Heusch, José Manuel Hidalgo, Gregory S. Hutcheson, Veronica Menaldi, Simone Pinet, Michael R. Solomon.