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Edited by Lynn A. Bryan and Kenneth Tobin

Critical Issues and Bold Visions for Science Education contains 16 chapters written by 32 authors from 11 countries. The book is intended for a broad audience of teachers, teacher educators, researchers, and policymakers. Interesting perspectives, challenging problems, and fresh solutions grounded in cutting edge theory and research are presented, interrogated, elaborated and, while retaining complexity, offer transformative visions within a context of political tensions, historical legacies, and grand challenges associated with Anthropocene (e.g., sustainability, climate change, mass extinctions).

Within overarching sociocultural frameworks, authors address diverse critical issues using rich theoretical frameworks and methodologies suited to research today and a necessity to make a difference while ensuring that all participants benefit from research and high standards of ethical conduct. The focus of education is broad, encompassing teaching, learning and curriculum in pre-k-12 schools, museums and other informal institutions, community gardens, and cheeseworld. Teaching and learning are considered for a wide range of ages, languages, and nationalities. An important stance that permeates the book is that research is an activity from which all participants learn, benefit, and transform personal and community practices. Transformation is an integral part of research in science education.

Contributors are: Jennifer Adams, Arnau Amat, Lucy Avraamidou, Marcília Elis Barcellos, Alberto Bellocchi, Mitch Bleier, Lynn A. Bryan, Helen Douglass, Colin Hennessy Elliott, Alejandro J. Gallard Martínez, Elisabeth Gonçalves de Souza, Da Yeon Kang, Shakhnoza Kayumova, Shruti Krishnamoorthy, Ralph Levinson, Sonya N. Martin, Jordan McKenzie, Kathy Mills, Catherine Milne, Ashley Morton, Masakata Ogawa, Rebecca Olson, Roger Patulny, Chantal Pouliot, Leah D. Pride, Anton Puvirajah, S. Lizette Ramos de Robles, Kathryn Scantlebury, Glauco S. F. da Silva, Michael Tan, Kenneth Tobin, and Geeta Verma.

Postgraduate Programmes as Platform

A Research-led Approach

Edited by Jacqueline van Swet, Petra Ponte and Ben Smit

Typical of postgraduate courses for experienced teachers is the wealth of professional experience that the students bring with them. Such students can examine their own practice, for which they are fully responsible. Postgraduate programmes are, therefore, challenged to create a flexible and research-led infrastructure that can respond to developments in the educational field and relate these developments to educational, philosophical, conceptual, and moral issues. Through the creation of a platform for such activities, the professional development of postgraduate students can be enriched. Authors from diverse backgrounds address important aspects of the platform, such as the relation between tutors and students; teachers’ professional identity; the voice of pupils; the characteristics of teachers’ workplace of the participating professionals; the relationship between action research and teacher leadership. This book offers inspiring and thought-provoking ideas to all involved in postgraduate programmes in teacher education: teacher educators, policy-makers, researchers, administrators, and schools collaborating with staff of postgraduate courses and their students. The book is an initiative of the Research Group ‘Interactive Professionalism and Knowledge Development’ at Fontys University of Applied Sciences, Department of Inclusive and Special Education, The Netherlands.

Trying to Teach in a Season of Great Untruth

Globalization, Empire and the Crises of Pedagogy

Series:

David Geoffrey Smith

These essays address contemporary issues in teaching, curriculum and pedagogy through tensions arising from the processes of globalization and empire. Of particular significance are the prejudices of Homo Oeconomicus or Economic Man (sic) that reduce the most profound of human relations, like those between the young and their elders, to an evermore constraining grammar of profit and loss. The predations of empire in turn divide the world into a site of war between friends and enemies, winners and losers. The times are dangerous, and educators need to speak to the world from the wisdom of their experience of standing with the young, for whom alone the future may still be open.