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Mijung Kim and Wolff-Michael Roth

Science educators have come to recognize children’s reasoning and problem solving skills as crucial ingredients of scientific literacy. As a consequence, there has been a concurrent, widespread emphasis on argumentation as a way of developing critical and creative minds. Argumentation has been of increasing interest in science education as a means of actively involving students in science and, thereby, as a means of promoting their learning, reasoning, and problem solving. Many approaches to teaching argumentation place primacy on teaching the structure of the argumentative genre prior to and at the beginning of participating in argumentation. Such an approach, however, is unlikely to succeed because to meaningfully learn the structure (grammar) of argumentation, one already needs to be competent in argumentation. This book offers a different approach to children’s argumentation and reasoning based on dialogical relations, as the origin of internal dialogue (inner speech) and higher psychological functions. In this approach, argumentation first exists as dialogical relation, for participants who are in a dialogical relation with others, and who employ argumentation for the purpose of the dialogical relation. With the multimodality of dialogue, this approach expands argumentation into another level of physicality of thinking, reasoning, and problem solving in classrooms. By using empirical data from elementary classrooms, this book explains how argumentation emerges and develops in and from classroom interactions by focusing on thinking and reasoning through/in relations with others and the learning environment.

The Narrative of Mathematics Teachers

Elementary School Mathematics Teachers’ Features of Education, Knowledge, Teaching and Personality

Edited by Dorit Patkin and Avikam Gazit

The issue of mathematics teaching and its impact on learners' attainments in this subject has continuously been on the public agenda. The anthology of chapters in this book consists of varied up-to-date studies of some of the best mathematics education researchers and mathematics teaching experts, exploring the varied aspects of this essential. The book depicts the elementary school mathematics teachers' world while relating to three aspects which comprise the professional environment of mathematics teachers: Teachers' education and teachers' knowledge, Teaching and Teachers' personality. The chapters are written on a level which addresses and might interest a wide readership: researchers, in-service teachers, pre-service teachers, parents and learners.

Activists under 30

Global Youth, Social Justice, and Good Work

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Edited by Shirley R. Steinberg

This unique book is divided into two sections. The first section highlights specific international youth activists, their biographies, work, and accomplishments. The second section is a collection of work by youth, who address their own activism, goals, identities, and needs. Commentaries by teachers, community workers, and facilitators compliment the entries, creating a unique, intergenerational and multi-faceted volume.

The book will serve to fill a gap in teacher education, highlighting and listening to youth, themselves, who, the editor, contends, should be intimately involved in their own education and futures. A new model for teacher education, this book allows teachers to understand that youth must have, and demand, a voice in the determination of their lives and futures. Previous work with youth tends to “deal with them” as a problem to be solved, a group to be managed. This book insists that youth are viable citizens and create a voice which is heard internationally.

Activists under 30 is the first book of its kind, to be addressed to youth, teachers, parents, and activists. It reminds us that youth are our most valuable resource, and insists we incorporate them, invite them, and listen to them.