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Edited by Lynn A. Bryan and Kenneth Tobin

Critical Issues and Bold Visions for Science Education contains 16 chapters written by 32 authors from 11 countries. The book is intended for a broad audience of teachers, teacher educators, researchers, and policymakers. Interesting perspectives, challenging problems, and fresh solutions grounded in cutting edge theory and research are presented, interrogated, elaborated and, while retaining complexity, offer transformative visions within a context of political tensions, historical legacies, and grand challenges associated with Anthropocene (e.g., sustainability, climate change, mass extinctions).

Within overarching sociocultural frameworks, authors address diverse critical issues using rich theoretical frameworks and methodologies suited to research today and a necessity to make a difference while ensuring that all participants benefit from research and high standards of ethical conduct. The focus of education is broad, encompassing teaching, learning and curriculum in pre-k-12 schools, museums and other informal institutions, community gardens, and cheeseworld. Teaching and learning are considered for a wide range of ages, languages, and nationalities. An important stance that permeates the book is that research is an activity from which all participants learn, benefit, and transform personal and community practices. Transformation is an integral part of research in science education.

Contributors are: Jennifer Adams, Arnau Amat, Lucy Avraamidou, Marcília Elis Barcellos, Alberto Bellocchi, Mitch Bleier, Lynn A. Bryan, Helen Douglass, Colin Hennessy Elliott, Alejandro J. Gallard Martínez, Elisabeth Gonçalves de Souza, Da Yeon Kang, Shakhnoza Kayumova, Shruti Krishnamoorthy, Ralph Levinson, Sonya N. Martin, Jordan McKenzie, Kathy Mills, Catherine Milne, Ashley Morton, Masakata Ogawa, Rebecca Olson, Roger Patulny, Chantal Pouliot, Leah D. Pride, Anton Puvirajah, S. Lizette Ramos de Robles, Kathryn Scantlebury, Glauco S. F. da Silva, Michael Tan, Kenneth Tobin, and Geeta Verma.

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Edited by Peter Duffy, Christine Hatton and Richard Sallis

At a time when universities demand immediate and quantifiable impacts of scholarship, the voices of research participants become secondary to impact factors and the volume of research produced. Moreover, what counts as research within the academy constrains practices and methods that may more authentically articulate the phenomena being studied. When external forces limit methodological practices, research innovation slows and homogenizes.

This book aims to address the methodological, interpretive, ethical/procedural challenges and tensions within theatre-based research with a goal of elevating our field’s research practice and inquiry. Each chapter embraces various methodologies, positionalities and examples of mediation by inviting two or more leading researchers to interrogated each other’s work and, in so doing, highlighted current debates and practices in theatre-based research. Topics include: ethics, method, audience, purpose, mediation, form, aesthetics, voice, data generation, and research participants. Each chapter frames a critical dialogue between researchers that take multiple forms (dialogic interlude, research conversation, dramatic narrative, duologue, poetic exchange, etc.).

Through the Fire – From Intake to Credential

Teacher Candidates Share Their Experiences through Narrative

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Cleveland Hayes, Kenneth J. Fasching-Varner, Hillary B. Eisworth and Kimberly White-Smith

By applying an auto-ethnographic approach in this volume to share and explore the experiences of prospective teachers as they navigate the preparation and credentialing processes of teacher education, we – as those who have gone before the future educators in this text and those who will come behind them, gain first hand insights from these young women and men about what it means and how to better prepare prospective educators to become a teacher against a backdrop of historical inequities in schooling and prepared for the multi-culturally diverse classrooms of today. Teacher educators, school and community leaders, and others committed to pushing toward more equitable social domains and forms of living and learning hence would do well to take up the opportunity provided in this text to learn from the narratives included in this volume and those of other teacher candidates; indeed, the narratives of teacher candidates herein and elsewhere are, in part, reflections of ourselves as teacher educators and evaluations of our work in teacher education and the professional preparation of those who will carry on our professions after us and for rising generations. What we as teacher educators teach, or think we are teaching, in teacher preparation courses may, or may not, be what prospective teachers are learning about being a teacher and successful teaching and learning for all learners, particularly those students historically underserved.

Each of the prospective educators who share their narratives in this volume are striving to become critical educators capable of promoting equitable educational and social opportunities, outcomes, and experiences for all learners. While their journeys are each distinctive and unique to them personally, the teacher candidates who share their narratives in this volume highlight some of the challenges and opportunities they have encountered in teacher preparation courses to learn about the functioning of social structures that sustain society’s existing hierarchies and develop the skills and knowledge requisite to identify, implement, and assess critical learning strategies aimed at challenging inequities and promoting more inclusive forms of education. Specifically, these future teachers included in this volume are sharing with us, their readers, their attempts at learning to unhook from Whiteness and to disrupt the pernicious and historical school-to-prison pipeline that has long existed in the US between the nation’s prison system and schools serving learners and their families and communities identified as racially not White, economically poor, and otherwise not members of the White, middle-class, primary English speaking, heterosexual, patriarchal mainstream.

Activists under 30

Global Youth, Social Justice, and Good Work

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Edited by Shirley R. Steinberg

This unique book is divided into two sections. The first section highlights specific international youth activists, their biographies, work, and accomplishments. The second section is a collection of work by youth, who address their own activism, goals, identities, and needs. Commentaries by teachers, community workers, and facilitators compliment the entries, creating a unique, intergenerational and multi-faceted volume.

The book will serve to fill a gap in teacher education, highlighting and listening to youth, themselves, who, the editor, contends, should be intimately involved in their own education and futures. A new model for teacher education, this book allows teachers to understand that youth must have, and demand, a voice in the determination of their lives and futures. Previous work with youth tends to “deal with them” as a problem to be solved, a group to be managed. This book insists that youth are viable citizens and create a voice which is heard internationally.

Activists under 30 is the first book of its kind, to be addressed to youth, teachers, parents, and activists. It reminds us that youth are our most valuable resource, and insists we incorporate them, invite them, and listen to them.

Examining Praxis

Assessment and Knowledge Construction in Teacher Education

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Edited by Matts Mattsson, Inge Johansson and Birgitta Sandström

Nurturing Praxis

Action Research in Partnerships between School and University in a Nordic Light

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Edited by Karin Rönnerman, Eli Moksnes Furu and Petri Salo

Nurturing Praxis offers a distinctive view of collaborative and action research in educational settings in four Nordic countries; Sweden, Norway, Finland and Iceland. Educational action research in Nordic countries is interpreted as being informed by the traditions of Bildung and (folk) enlightenment and thereby emphasizing the importance of collaboration, discussion and dialogue in knowledge creation. It explores the professional development of teachers, especially through school-university partnerships in which university researchers collaborate with teachers in a variety of educational settings in order to bring about change in and better understanding of practice. It presents case studies of professional development in the context educational reform and change, originating from both inside and outside schools, and tackled with or enhanced by collaborative and action research. By analysing the cases in the light of the Nordic traditions of Bildung and (folk) enlightenment, the authors have been able to identify a number of key features of professional development enhanced by collaborative and action research. These features are drawn together in the last chapter, in a comprehensive framework for Nurturing Praxis.

Power, Pedagogy and Praxis

Social Justice in the Globalized Classroom

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Edited by Shannon A. Moore and Richard C. Mitchell

The aim of the text is to respond to gaps in an emergent discourse running along minority/majority world fault lines through various perspectives linking globalization, education and human rights. The editors’standpoint allows the consideration of equity in education as the foremost expression of social justice in this era of economic and technological globalization regardless of political or cultural contexts. This project continues the tradition of critical social pedagogy in creating common ground that accesses new approaches to political and classroom-based relations of power and praxis.

Towards Quality Improvement of Action Research

Developing Ethics and Standards

Edited by Ben Boog, Meindert Slager, Julia Preece and Jacques Zeelen

This book offers perspectives and challenges for action research in contemporary society with a particular reflection on ethics and standards. On the one hand the world is becoming smaller and much more open with tremendous opportunities for international exchange and multi-cultural enrichment. On the other hand the divide between the poor and the rich is deepening, international tensions are growing and the sustainability of the environment is under considerable threat on a worldwide basis. These trends are challenging politicians, civil society and social movements to search for problem solving strategies to deal with the risks of exclusion, poverty, social and physical insecurity and environmental deprivation.
The intriguing question is what role action research could play in order to address these challenges? Action research has something to offer because it favours the connection between knowledge production and social change by means of partnerships between researchers, practitioners and a variety of client stakeholders. The focus is on providing the means to improve people’s self determination - to empower them in their roles as professional practitioners or citizens in the diverse social domains in which they live and work. Participatory action research and learning processes enable participants to improve the impact of services and programs in education, health care, urban and regional development, business, agriculture, arts, care of the elderly, leisure and many other spheres of social life.
The approach of action research, which is rooted among others in the work of John Dewey and Kurt Lewin, covers nowadays a landscape of different concepts such as participatory action research, cooperative inquiry and action learning, to mention just a few. In this book scholars from those divergent concepts of action research present and discuss instructive examples of action research practices from developed as well developing countries. Special attention is paid to the vital issue of how this type of research can be conducted in a participatory, responsible, transparent and scientific way.