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The Negotiated Self

Employing Reflexive Inquiry to Explore Teacher Identity

Edited by Ellyn Lyle

Teacher identity resides in the foundational beliefs and assumptions educators have about teaching and learning. These beliefs and assumptions develop both inside and outside of the classroom, blurring the lines between the professional and the personal. Examining the development of teacher identity at this intersection requires a unique reflexive capacity.

Reflexive inquiry is both established and continually emerging. At its most basic, reflexivity refers to researchers’ consciousness of their role in and effect on both the act of doing research and arriving at research findings. In making central the role of the researcher in the research process, reflexive inquiry interrogates agency while examining philosophical notions about the nature of knowledge.

While advancements have been made in investigating the relationship between teacher knowledge and teacher practice, the research often fails to connect this meaning with self-knowledge and issues of identity. Through a consideration of these tenets, the authors in this collection embrace critical, qualitative, creative, and arts-integrated approaches to examine ways that reflexive inquiry supports studies in teacher identity. Moving between theory and lived experience, the authors individually and collectively lay bare teacher identity as negotiated while evidencing the epistemological merits of reflexive inquiry.

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Edited by Jill Blackmore, Marie Brennan and Lew Zipin

This book examines changing ways that academic work is governed—from outside and inside universities—in the shifting social, cultural and political contexts of new times. Chapters trace developments in institutions, national sectors, and internationally—all applying a global scope to identify significant shifts in the broader conditions of university operation. Attention is given to governance processes across all key domains of academic work: teaching, research, leadership, management and institutional organisation. Key trends are analysed, including risk management, audit culture, league tables, techniques of accountability, and more. These investigations bring forth re-conceptions of university ‘governance’ as involving increasingly distributed and networked arrays of mechanisms, affecting academic work practices, relations, values, emotional labours and identities. Ambiguities, tensions and complexities of academic work are explored; and questions are raised as to whether prevailing managerial modes of governance can address these features of university engagement with globalising contexts.

Unaccomplished Utopia

Neoconservative Dismantling of Public Higher Education in the European Union

Edited by João M. Paraskeva

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Edited by Gaële Goastellec

Which inequalities characterise today higher education’systems, which one do they produce and which one do they fight? This book answers this three sides question by developing a comprehensive approach to depict and frame inequalities in and by higher education. By doing so, it provides researchers and policies makers with a tool to think and fight inequalities.
Drawing on a multilevel and international perspective, this book analyses the inequalities issue at three levels (Access to higher education, Success in higher education and Access to academic careers as an illustration of inequalities in access to the marketplace) by using complementary disciplines and approaches. Besides national histories of higher education and their path dependencies, societal specificities and their understanding of what diversity means and how it can be measured, international pressures to admit common norms, inequalities are today thought in an always more multidimensional, qualitative way. Relying on cases studies, this book takes the reader through the contemporary complexity of higher education inequalities to finally provide him with a conceptual scheme of reading the dimensions weighting on inequalities and think the potential tools to address them.

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Edited by Tina (A.C.) Besley

Tina Besley has edited this collection which examines and critiques the ways that different countries, particularly Commonwealth and European states, assess the quality of educational research in publicly funded higher education institutions. Such assessment often ranks universities, departments and even individual academics, and plays an important role in determining the allocation of funding to support university research. Yet research is only one aspect of academic performance alongside teaching and service or administration components. The book focuses on the theoretical and practical issues that accompany the development of national and international systems of research assessment, particularly in the field of education. In our interconnected, globalised world, some of the ideas of assessment that have evolved in one country have almost inevitably travelled elsewhere especially the UK model. Consequently the book comprises an introduction, eighteen chapters that discuss the situation in ten countries, followed by a postscript. It gathers together an outstanding group of twenty-five prominent international scholars with expertise in the field of educational research and includes many with hands-on experience in the peer review process. The book is designed to appeal to a wide group of people involved as knowledge workers and knowledge managers—academics, students and policy makers - in higher education and interested in assessment and accountability mechanisms and processes.

Buying your Way into Heaven

Education and Corruption in International Perspective

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Edited by Stephen P. Heyneman

Education is commonly thought to be a haven for the young. No matter how unstable the polity, no matter how dismal the prospects for the economy, education investments are often treated as sacrosanct. This is one reason for the popularity of education as part of foreign aid. Who could object to providing more opportunity for young people to study? Recently however, it has been discovered that education systems can be as corrupt as other parts of government and the economy; and that values of fairness and impartiality, once thought to be universal characteristics of education systems, can be supplanted by the interests of specific individuals, families and ethnic groups. Education corruption has now been found in all regions of the world, but it manifests itself in different ways. How do these differ from one region to another? What should be done to minimize education corruption? And what should be done to protect universities and employers in areas situated where there is little corruption from the products of those parts of the world where education corruption is the norm. This book will explain the meaning of education corruption and how it works; it will provide illustrations from Asia, Africa, Southeastern Europe and the former Soviet Union, and it will propose actions and policies on the part of regional and international agencies to counter-act what is now likely to become a new and unexpected global crisis.

A Carpenter's Daughter

A Working-Class Woman in Higher Education

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Renny Christopher

A Carpenter’s Daughter is the story of the difficulties and rewards of the educational system for one who was not meant to go through it. The single most reliable predictor of whether someone will earn a BA is whether at least one of their parents has one-yet, today, there are an increasing number of first-generation college students. A Carpenter’s Daughter is both a memoir of the author’s experiences growing up, going to school, and becoming an academic and a thoughtful commentary on the meaning of class in American culture. By connecting her own story with ideas from scholarly works on class and identity, Christopher shows how her individual experiences reflect common struggles that people of working-class background face when their education, profession, income, and lifestyles change. This work reminds us forcefully that "moving up" isn't necessarily good and that changing one’s class isn't as simple as going to class or even becoming the teacher of the class.—Sherry Linkon, author of Teaching Working Class The work is stellar, merging the tangled and complex webs of social mobility through education in ways that leave lots of loose ends dangling just the way it should. No pretty bows adorning carefully wrapped packages here. No straight and narrow trajectory toward a mainstream version of success. Instead, readers will be pulled along by nuanced narratives portraying the warped nature of society’s construction of success and a careful crafting of the book in its entirety as a disjointed text presenting shards of a life that can never be visible in a tidied-up tale.—Stephanie Jones, University of Georgia

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Edited by Hans de Wit, Pawan Agarwal, Mohsen Elmahdy Said, Molatlhegi T. Sehoole and Muhammad Sirozi

Student mobility is the most important factor in the internationalization of higher education. In this book, existing assumptions will be questioned: that mobility is primarily South-North and North-North, and that South-South flows are rather marginal; that the economic rationale has become so dominant that there are nearly no other motives to be found anymore; and that the growing presence of national and international providers of higher education, and opportunities for distance education, reduce the need for international student mobility. The dynamics of international student circulation will be analyzed on the basis of four countries (Egypt, India, Indonesia and South Africa), which are perceived to be primarily on the sending side of student mobility, and Europe and the USA, which are perceived to be primarily but not exclusively on the receiving side. These case studies will be placed in the context of broader developments in the internationalization of higher education, and related to definitions, methodological issues and global data, as used by UNESCO, OECD and others. This study has been undertaken by five scholars from different parts of the world in the context of the 2005-2006 New Century Scholars Programme 'Higher Education in the Twenty- First Century', of the Fulbright Programme. The book will be of relevance for both researchers and practitioners on globalization and the internationalization of higher education.

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Peter Roberts and Michael A. Peters

This book addresses key developments in higher education and research policy over the past decade. The authors pay particular attention to policy changes in New Zealand following the formation of a Labour-Alliance coalition government in 1999. From 1999 to 2008, a version of ‘Third Way’ politics has been applied in the New Zealand context. A key government goal has been to advance New Zealand as a ‘knowledge society and economy’, and education at the tertiary level has been seen as crucial in achieving this. Neoliberalism, Higher Education and Research considers the relationship between neoliberalism and the Third Way, discusses international trends in knowledge capitalism, examines performance-based research funding, critiques the rhetoric of ‘quality’ and ‘relevance’ in recent higher education policy, and assesses possibilities for critical citizenship and intellectual life in the 21st century. Much can be learned from the New Zealand experience in reflecting on policy developments in other countries, and this book will be of interest to all who ponder the future of knowledge and education in a globalised world.

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Edited by Ray Land, Jan H.F. Meyer and Jan Smith

Threshold Concepts within the Disciplines brings together leading writers from various disciplines and national contexts in an important and readable volume for all those concerned with teaching and learning in higher education.
The foundational principle of threshold concepts is that there are, in each discipline, ‘conceptual gateways’ or ‘portals’ that must be negotiated to arrive at important new understandings. In crossing the portal, transformation occurs, both in knowledge and subjectivity. Such transformation involves troublesome knowledge, a key concern for contributors to this book, who identify threshold concepts in their own fields and suggest how to deal with them.
Part One extends and enhances the threshold concept framework, containing chapters that articulate its qualities, its links to other social theories of learning and other traditions in educational research.
Part Two encompasses the disciplinary heart of the book with contributions from a diversity of areas including computing, engineering, biology, design, modern languages, education and economics. In the many empirical case studies educators show how they have used the threshold concept framework to inform and evaluate their teaching contexts. Other chapters emphasise the equally important ‘being and becoming’ dimension of learning.
Part Three suggests pedagogic directions for those at the centre of the education project with contributions focusing on the socialisation of academics and their continuing quest to be effective teachers.
The book will be of interest to disciplinary teachers, educational researchers and educational developers. It also is of relevance to issues in quality assurance and professional accreditation.