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Another Way

Decentralization, Democratization and the Global Politics of Community-Based Schooling

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Edited by Rebecca Clothey and Kai Heidemann

Drawing on a variety of methodological and theoretical perspectives, the case studies compiled in Another Way: Decentralization, Democratization and the Global Politics of Community-Based Schooling offer a comparative look at how global processes of educational decentralization have both helped and hindered the development of community-based schools in local-level settings across Europe, Africa, Asia and the Americas. On the one hand, the book shows how increased decentralization is often perceived as essential to assuring robust levels of democratization, community participation and social justice in education. On the other hand, it is also shown how processes of educational decentralization are often experienced in local communities as a mechanism of increased austerity, privatization and segregation.

Identity and Internationalization in Catholic Universities

Exploring Institutional Pathways in Context

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Edited by Hans de Wit, Andrés Bernasconi, Visnja Car, Fiona Hunter, Michael James and Daniela Véliz

Identity and Internationalization in Catholic Universities explores the relationship between Catholic identity, mission, and internationalization in Catholic universities of different types and located in different contexts. Internationalization is a key concern for universities working to achieve their goals in different regions of the world but without neglecting their identity. There are many universities that consider themselves related to the Roman Catholic faith and many other universities with Christian affiliations. It is well known that Catholic universities have unique missions, such as the formation of individuals inspired by a religious conviction to serve society and the church. That is why it is imperative to have empirical knowledge to help develop practical and effective policies on central themes such as internationalization, a fundamental part of many universities’ developmental strategies, while paying special attention to each university’s specific context. This book includes sixteen case studies from Latin America, the United States, the Asia Pacific, and Europe, and also includes chapters on regional perspectives on Catholic higher education as well as more specifically Jesuit higher education, the global network of La Salle universities, and internationalization in the United States, Latin America, the Asia Pacific region, and Europe.

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Edited by Keiichi Ogawa and Mikiko Nishimura

Achieving Universal Primary Education (UPE) has received considerable attention since the early 1950s. The concept of universal education is, however, not well defined and is used to mean many different things to different people. This book contains a five-year research work conducted by a group of African and Japanese researchers who have developed an equal partnership and network to review the expansion of primary education, some policies prompting the free primary education intervention, and the challenges of implementation based on the case study of two districts in four countries, namely, Ghana, Kenya, Malawi, and Uganda. The first part discusses issues related to administrative, financial, and perceptive issues related to UPE policies in each country case, followed by the second part that focuses on quality of education and UPE policies. The book contains various lessons learnt and implications for future education policies in developing countries.

Educational Internationalisation

Academic Voices and Public Policy

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Edited by Jennifer Olson, Heidi Biseth and Guillermo Ruiz

This book is part of the Sense Publishers series emerging from the 2013 WCCES XV World Congress in Buenos Aires (Series Editors Suzanne Majhanovich and Allan Pitman). The Congress Theme of New Times, New Voices provided the broad frame for the conference and the series of volumes, including this one, which contains research contributions focusing on educational internationalisation. Ever since the early days of international and comparative inquiry in education, the idea that policy and practice might be borrowed or transferred from one location to another has been a continuing theme. Several studies included in this volume focus on the activities of governments, the interactions between supranational organisations and states and the role of private and civil society actors in educational internationalisation.
The chapters in this volume explore how internationalisation is carried out in various educational levels and through new or expanding policies and practices. Moreover, the chapters represent diverse research perspectives and geographical regions. More specifically, they examine issues pertaining to: (1) changes in the academic profession, (2) responses to the European Bologna Process and European perspectives on internationalisation, (3) political and institutional interventions that shape educational policy agendas, (4) children’s rights and teacher education in Latin America, and (5) the voices of Roma interest groups. Taken together, these chapters explore the relationships between academic voices and those of international organisations, as well as how national policy makers interpret contrasting international discourses, and political and social factors that influence educational internationalisation processes.

Education, Language, and Economics

Growing National and Global Dilemmas

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Edited by MacLeans A. Geo-JaJa and Suzanne Majhanovich

There are two contending opinions with regard to the seemingly amorphous phenomenon of globalization. Some believe that globalization has brought rapid prosperity to developing countries while others argue that globalization best serves the needs of countries of the developed world. Bringing globalization under the microscope of education, this book illustrates how globalization is producing unprecedented impacts on education and culture through a series of country case studies elaborating on effects of economic and educational policies in the modern globalized world. New emphasis on the interplay between state and education policy initiatives in developed and developing countries also illuminates the direct and indirect impact of globalization in equity and quality-driven education reforms, with particular focus on the contribution of marketization or privatization to the ongoing commodification of education and curricula, presenting dilemmas to both developed and developing countries to provide quality education for all, protect human rights, and ensure equity in all realms of human endeavor.
This book offers a multiplicity of approaches to education and development, and posits that distributional equity and quality education in a globalized world require a strong state and commitment to social justice to counteract growing disparities evident in educational and economic indices. The authors illustrate how respatialization of the contemporary state is rapidly taking shape in concrete institutions to recast the boundaries of the social, political and economic in fundamental ways. Education, Language, and Economics: Growing National and Global Dilemmas serves as an ideal introduction to key contemporary debates on politics, culture, and the economy.

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Edited by Giovanni Pampanini, Faten Adly and Diane Brook Napier

In no part of the world today is the concept of intercultural exchange a novelty, and in many parts of the world it has even been a long tradition. Nevertheless, recent globalization forces have combined to accelerate many aspects of migration and intercultural confrontation. As a result, we see an emerging world society in which intercultural mixing and conflict are salient characteristics, rather than being exceptional situations or embryonic phases of societal development. The need for intercultural education and for intercultural dialogue in various forms has become universal. All people have an obligation to participate in- and take responsibility for- world peace, balanced sustainable development, and democratic dialogue to create “the capacity to live together.” Persistent and increasingly complex patterns of population movement, with all of the societal ramifications that accompany them, demand consideration of ways in which different societies respond to issues of intercultural education and dialogue, both historically and currently.
Interculturalism, Society and Education contains contributions that explore comparative and international case studies ranging from accounts of educational problems impacting specific immigrant groups in Europe, socio-educational programs and projects in Africa and Asia, comparative analyses of “citizenship education” issues in selected countries, and a global overview of different patterns of the interculturalism-society-education nexus. This volume offers a sampling of the multiplicity of intercultural forms around the world, useful for policy-makers and educators across the spectrum of institutions and organizations that strive to open paths for positive intercultural exchange through education.

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Edited by Birgit Brock-Utne, Z. Desai, Martha A.S. Qorro and Allan Pitman

This book is based on chapters in a series of four books from the first five years (2002-2006) of the Language of Instruction in Tanzania and South Africa (LOITASA) project. LOITASA is a NUFU-funded (Norwegian University Fund) project which began in January 2002 and will continue through to the end of 2011. The chapters reflect the state of the research at the end of the first five years of LOITASA in 2006 and were selected by reviewers independent of the project.

The selection of chapters brought together bring to the forefront the dilemmas facing developing countries as they seek to position themselves in an increasingly interconnected global system, while at the same time maintaining a sense of national and regional identity. The chapters in this collection reflect both positive outcomes when the medium of instruction is a widely-known language as well as the challenges of mother tongue instruction in countries where historically a powerful language like English has dominated.

The four LOITASA books in this series from which the chapters in this book are drawn are:

Language of instruction in Tanzania and South Africa (LOITASA) published by E & D Ltd, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
Researching the language of instruction in Tanzania and South Africa published by African Minds, Cape Town South Africa
LOITASA Research in Progress published by KAD Associates, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.
Focus on fresh data on the language of instruction debate in Tanzania and South Africa published by African Minds, Cape Town, South Africa.

All four books are edited by Birgit Brock-Utne, the Norwegian project leader of the LOITASA project; Zubeida Desai, the South African project leader and Martha Qorro, who is on the project steering committee in Tanzania.

New Thinking in Comparative Education

Honouring Robert Cowen

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Edited by Marianne A. Larsen

This book is a cutting-edge collection of articles inspired by the writings of Robert Cowen about comparative education. Authors take up Cowen’s central concerns: re-theorising the field of comparative education, rethinking the interpretive concepts that are used by comparative education researchers, and the relationships between them. The authors take us beyond old ideas to provide some new and fresh thinking on and about educational phenomena and the field of comparative education. Writers engage in critical thinking about the intellectual agenda of comparative education, the role of theory in their work, the contexts that are shaping the field, and epistemic consequences of these broader changes for comparative education.
The volume contains voices from a variety of geographical regions, theoretical positions, newer and more well-established scholars in the field. The book also includes shorter reflections from individuals in the field who know Robert Cowen personally. More well-established themes in the field are discussed such as borrowing and transfer, as well as newer concepts and ideas from Cowen’s work including shape-shifting, and transitologies. New Thinking in Comparative Education will be of interest to those who are studying and doing research in the field of comparative and international education, both at the under-graduate and graduate levels of education.

Reforming Teaching and Learning

Comparative Perspectives in a Global Era

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Edited by Maria Teresa Tatto and Monica Mincu

This volume addresses the larger question of the effects of (global) educational reform on teaching and learning as they relate to the context, the policies and politics where reform occurs.
Maria Teresa Tatto and Monica Mincu bring together a group of leading scholars in the field representing a variety of national contexts and geographical areas. The chapters in the book raise crucial questions such as: What is the impact of globalization on local education systems and traditions? What roles do international agencies play? What is the role of the state? What is the role of policy networks? How do we understand the functions of quality assurance mechanisms, standards, competencies, and the “new” accountability? In doing so the chapters discuss the institutions and organization of education and how these shape what teachers learn and, eventually, teach to diverse populations.
The book uses a number of analytical frameworks and theoretical perspectives, from critical discourse analysis, regime theory, empirical exploration of teachers’ thinking and actions within school contexts, analysis of reform diffusion and global trends. Using analysis of the literature and relevant documents, case studies and diverse forms of survey research, this work offers a glimpse of the complexities that exist in the fields of teaching and learning.
This collection is also an occasion to observe the profile of knowledge production in these cultural contexts, the interplay between local and national research agendas and traveling policies around the world.

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Edited by Hans de Wit, Pawan Agarwal, Mohsen Elmahdy Said, Molatlhegi T. Sehoole and Muhammad Sirozi

Student mobility is the most important factor in the internationalization of higher education. In this book, existing assumptions will be questioned: that mobility is primarily South-North and North-North, and that South-South flows are rather marginal; that the economic rationale has become so dominant that there are nearly no other motives to be found anymore; and that the growing presence of national and international providers of higher education, and opportunities for distance education, reduce the need for international student mobility. The dynamics of international student circulation will be analyzed on the basis of four countries (Egypt, India, Indonesia and South Africa), which are perceived to be primarily on the sending side of student mobility, and Europe and the USA, which are perceived to be primarily but not exclusively on the receiving side. These case studies will be placed in the context of broader developments in the internationalization of higher education, and related to definitions, methodological issues and global data, as used by UNESCO, OECD and others. This study has been undertaken by five scholars from different parts of the world in the context of the 2005-2006 New Century Scholars Programme 'Higher Education in the Twenty- First Century', of the Fulbright Programme. The book will be of relevance for both researchers and practitioners on globalization and the internationalization of higher education.