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Series:

Edited by Annie Guerin and Trish McMenamin

In Belonging: Rethinking Inclusive Practices to Support Well-Being and Identity, issues related to inclusive education and belonging across a range of education contexts from early childhood to tertiary education are examined and matters related to participation, policy and theory, and identity and well-being are explored. Individual chapters, which are drawn from papers presented at The Inclusive Education Summit held at the University of Canterbury, 2016, canvass a variety of topics including pedagogy, sexuality, theory, policy and practice. These topics are explored from the authors’ varying perspectives as practitioners, academics and lay-persons and also from varying international perspectives including New Zealand, South Africa and Australia.

Contributors are: Keith Ballard, Henrietta Bollinger, Hera Cook, Michael Gafffney, Annie Guerin, Fiona Henderson, Leechin Heng, Kate McAnelly, Trish McMenamin, Be Pannell, Christine Rietveld, Marie Turner, Ben Whitburn, Julie White, and Melanie Wong.

School Space and its Occupation

Conceptualising and Evaluating Innovative Learning Environments

Series:

Edited by Scott Alterator and Craig Deed

School Space and its Occupation addresses the ongoing and pressing need for justification of education and environmental innovation. Further, the increasingly important work of evaluating the new learning spaces brings attention to the need for conceptual and methodological clarity.

The editors have assembled a collection of leading authors to explore the links between education and design, progression of ideas in education and architecture, as well as making sense of pedagogical trends and spatial and design relevance. Post-occupancy evaluation is capable of informing both educational and architectural questions to generate sustainable adaptations for educators and designers. Part 2 focuses on the occupancy phase and examines the lived experience of schools to draw conclusions and make recommendations focused impacts and methodological progression.

Contributors: Renae Acton, Scott Alterator, Benjamin Cleveland, Craig Deed, Matthew Dwyer, Debra Edwards, Neil Gislason, Wesley Imms, Peter Lippman, Elizabeth Matthews, Marcus Morse, Vaughan Prain, Matthew Riddle, Warren Sellers, Rebecca Townsend, and Adam Wood.

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Conrad Hughes

Educating for the Twenty-First Century is an engaging account of some of the most critical challenges for humanity, seen through the unique perspective of a school principal.

A virtuoso performance of great imaginative force, the book takes the reader through philosophical reflections, humorous anecdotes, syntheses of cutting-edge research and examples of best practice, to answer fundamental questions about education and learning in the 21st century.

Provocative, touching, accessible, but always profound, the book is a must-read for policy-makers, school and university leaders, parents and anyone passionate about education and the future of the planet.

"A significant book, which makes it required reading for educators, public policy experts, indeed every thoughtful citizen of our time."
AC Grayling
Philosopher and Master of the New College of the Humanities

"An essential book for all those who are interested in the future of their children, in other words, the very future of humanity."
Luc Ferry
Philosopher and former Minister of Education, France

Edited by Taina Brown and Alejandro Mieses Castellanos

Shaping visual literacy has been at the forefront of contemporary discourse, as images have increasingly surpassed words in becoming the primary vehicles to persuade our emotions. Visually encoded domains of symbols and signs inform the educational, public and entertainment industries increasingly as an undifferentiated whole, aided by globalizing media forces in various forms. Whether top-down, peer-peer, one-to-may, or many-to-many, this volume attempts to derive sets of rules used to visually decode patterns present in certain media formats – press, cinema, television and maps, among others – and the place of the spectator in their respective dynamics. The topics discussed transition through various approaches to deconstruct mass media influences to engage critical thinking skills, and ending with a collection of chapters dedicated to exploring their effects upon children, and the capacity to be implemented to foster collaboration-based creative learning environments.

Beyond Observations

Narratives and Young Children

Susanne Garvis, Elin Eriksen Ødegaard and Narelle Lemon

This book provides important insights into narratives and young children. It is structured to help others learn more about the importance of narrative approaches and early childhood education. The first section of the book explores the concept of narrative across the current research field. The second section explores a range of different narrative methods related to young children.
Readers will discover how narrative methods empower children to be heard and respected by adults. They will also discover the importance of narrative methods in allowing a sharing of understanding, knowledge and trust in contemporary times.
Overall, the book aims to encourage readers to critically reflect on new ways of thinking about contemporary research and young children.

Elena Xeni

Ways to understand creativity better, as well as investigate, enhance, introduce and implement creativity more effectively, are some of the issues tackled in this collection of papers. This is an essential, inspiring and uplifting book, which covers trends, methods and practices that are evolving within the field of creativity and creativity in education.

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Keith Edmonds

The book outlines the eradication of democratic freedoms and the emptiness that pervades postmodern existence, combining psychodynamic theories of human behaviour with the politics of consumption. The stark contrast between a representative democracy and our current form of governance is highlighted throughout the book, as corporations have become remarkably adept at creating needs - perceived needs - by convincing consumers that self-fulfilment resides in the purchase of the latest Lexus, IPod, Blackberry, antidepressant, or diet plan. The reader will gain an appreciable understanding of the forces that shape our behaviour and the inadequacy of a democratic institution based on the promotion of special interests and the empty promises of political talking heads.

(Anti) Narcissisms and (Anti) Capitalisms

Human Nature and Education in the Works of Mahatma Gandhi, Malcolm X, Nelson Mandela and Jurgen Habermas

Mark Malisa

What if Mahatma Gandhi, Malcolm X, Nelson Mandela and Jurgen Habermas had a conversation on what it means to be a human being? This book synthesizes the depiction of human nature in relation to (anti)capitalisms and (anti)narcissisms in the work of Mahatma Gandhi (Moksha), Malcolm X (Islam), Nelson Mandela (Ubuntu), and Jurgen Habermas (Communicative Action/Critical Theory). Understandings of what it means to be a human being and the purpose of life vary from one philosophy to another, and yet have a bearing on contemporary issues. The reader is invited to assess the philosophies with regard to conceptually and life affirming philosophies of human nature when placed in the context of (anti)narcissisms and (anti)capitalisms. Also examined are the theories of education in the works Mahatma Gandhi, Malcolm X, Nelson Mandela, and Jurgen Habermas. To teach toward a fuller and meaningful humanity requires an analysis and understanding of the many traditions that contribute to humankind, including the non-western. The classroom offers unheralded opportunities for students and educators to be knowledgeable about different cultures, peoples, and ways of being. (Anti)Narcissisms and (Anti)Capitalisms will be of interest to researchers, educators, students, peace activists, philosophers of education, and those working in the humanities. Mark Malisa Formerly of Northeastern University, Boston: Massachusetts, United States of America