Reel Big Bullies

Teaching to the Problem

Series:

Brian C. Johnson and James E. Vines

Talk with students about bullying in their schools/communities and three themes are likely to emerge: a) there’s nothing anyone can do about it, b) bullying is necessary as it builds character, and c) there needs to be more educational programming in the schools designed to curb bullying behavior.

Contrast those sentiments with the helplessness teachers and administrators feel. Many will tell you that current state and federal guidelines tie their hands until after an incident occurs. In other words, a student must get hurt before the school is able to do anything. Reel Big Bullies is designed for regular anti-bullying campaigns and will not cost struggling districts thousands of dollars to implement as it provides teachers with educational resources to complement regular instruction in classrooms.

Using clips from Hollywood blockbusters like Knocked Up, The Emperor’s New Groove, The Benchwarmers and others, Reel Big Bullies is designed to help students, administrators, teachers and counselors create a safer school environment for all students. It is also intended to help all students understand the terrible toll bullying can take on its targets, and to encourage students to stand up for their classmates who are being bullied.

The book’s framework follows the three themes above and discusses the pertinent legal and policy decisions affecting educational intervention. With the already busy (overwhelmed) teacher in mind, we describe nearly 200 film clips teachers can show in class to promote and spark discussions with students in middle and high schools.

Disrupting Shameful Legacies

Girls and Young Women Speaking Back through the Arts to Address Sexual Violence

Series:

Edited by Claudia Mitchell and Relebohile Moletsane

Much has been written in Canada and South Africa about sexual violence in the context of colonial legacies, particularly for Indigenous girls and young women. While both countries have attempted to deal with the past through Truth and Reconciliation Commissions and Canada has embarked upon its National Inquiry on Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls, there remains a great deal left to do. Across the two countries, history, legislation and the lived experiences of young people, and especially girls and young women point to a deeply rooted situation of marginalization. Violence on girls’ and women’s bodies also reflects violence on the land and especially issues of dispossession. What approaches and methods would make it possible for girls and young women, as knowers and actors, especially those who are the most marginalized, to influence social policy and social change in the context of sexual violence?

Taken as a whole, the chapters in Disrupting Shameful Legacies: Girls and Young Women Speaking Back through the Arts to Address Sexual Violence which come out of a transnational study on sexual violence suggest a new legacy, one that is based on methodologies that seek to disrupt colonial legacies, by privileging speaking up and speaking back through the arts and visual practice to challenge the situation of sexual violence. At the same time, the fact that so many of the authors of the various chapters are themselves Indigenous young people from either Canada or South Africa also suggests a new legacy of leadership for change.

Expanding Waistlines

An Educator's Guide to Childhood Obesity

Series:

David Campos

Many health experts agree that childhood obesity is an epidemic in the modern world. In the United States alone, government data suggest that the number of overweight or obese children is nearly triple the number of 1980, and there are no signs that this incidence is decreasing. Information like this cannot be ignored or trivialized because excess weight can prove damaging to general wellness. Indeed, overweight or obese children and youth risk a wide range of medical complications. Extra pounds can also negatively impact their well-being, which can cause long-term mental health problems. In short, if the childhood obesity crisis is left forsaken, an unprecedented generation of youth will have a diminished quality of life.
Expanding Waistlines is ideal for child advocates and youth-serving professionals who seek to learn more about childhood obesity. A prominent feature of Expanding Waistlines is that each chapter poses a series of questions relevant to school personnel, such as:
• What can I do at my school and in my classroom?
• How should I approach my students who are overweight or obese?
• What are some key elements I should look for when evaluating a potential program?
Specifically, the book explores the factors that contribute to obesity in society and the associated risks of excess weight on children and youth. Subsequent chapters discuss how to promote healthy eating practices and regular physical activity at school and home. The final chapters report on specific resources. Expanding Waistlines also features the latest demographic data, BMI calculations and classifications, recommended guidelines for health, Wellness Policy requirements, and food label information.

Girls in a Goldfish Bowl

Moral Regulation, Ritual and the Use of Power amongst Inner City Girls

Series:

Rosalyn George

What are the processes of exclusion and inclusion amongst girls’ friendship groups? Can friendship and bullying coexist? Is the leader in the class always the most popular member of the class? What is the role of the teacher in consolidating group friendships? How are culturally diverse friendships negotiated? What impact does the process of transition from primary to secondary school have on existing friendship networks? Through an exploration of the emotional and social dynamics of young girls’ friendship groups, this book addresses these and other questions, which are important in their lives. The girls that feature in this book are inner city preadolescent girls as they transfer from their inner city primary school to their secondary schools. The schools are all located within an urban context and represent the state and public sector of education. The girls encompass the diversity of ethnicities that are found within large urban communities and how they negotiate and manage their friendships across ethnic divisions is a key aspect of this book. By focussing on the constitution of the friendship groups, questions of ‘leadership’ and ‘popularity’, ‘race’ and ethnicity and ‘bullying’ are interrogated and their resonance for the ‘exclusionary’ and ‘inclusionary’ practices which often characterise friendship groups are examined.
This book highlights the emotional investment girls make in their friendships and will support teachers, youth workers and others working within educational contexts, in making visible this previously unattended aspect of young girls’ lives.