Series:

Edited by Peter Duffy, Christine Hatton and Richard Sallis

At a time when universities demand immediate and quantifiable impacts of scholarship, the voices of research participants become secondary to impact factors and the volume of research produced. Moreover, what counts as research within the academy constrains practices and methods that may more authentically articulate the phenomena being studied. When external forces limit methodological practices, research innovation slows and homogenizes.

This book aims to address the methodological, interpretive, ethical/procedural challenges and tensions within theatre-based research with a goal of elevating our field’s research practice and inquiry. Each chapter embraces various methodologies, positionalities and examples of mediation by inviting two or more leading researchers to interrogated each other’s work and, in so doing, highlighted current debates and practices in theatre-based research. Topics include: ethics, method, audience, purpose, mediation, form, aesthetics, voice, data generation, and research participants. Each chapter frames a critical dialogue between researchers that take multiple forms (dialogic interlude, research conversation, dramatic narrative, duologue, poetic exchange, etc.).

They’re Called the “Throwaways”

Children in Special Education Using Artmaking for Social Change

Edited by Christa Boske

School communities identified these children as the “throwaways”-children who often experienced bullying, abuse, foster care, juvenile detention, and special education services. In this book, children with learning differences engage in artmaking as sensemaking to deepen their understanding of what it means to live on the margins in U.S. public K-12 schools. Their artmaking calls upon educators, school leaders, and policymakers to actively engage in addressing the injustices many of the children faced in school. This book is revolutionary. For the first time, children with learning differences, teachers, staff, and school leaders come together and share how they understand the role artmaking as sensemaking plays in empowering disenfranchised populations. Together, they encourage school community members to examine pedagogical practices, eliminate exclusive policies, and promote social justice-oriented work in schools. Their artmaking inspires new ways of knowing and responding to the lived experiences of children with learning differences. They hope their work encourages school communities to make authentic connections to improve their learning, capacity to love others, and of most importantly, to value oneself. Authors’ first-tellings capture the human experience of navigating through oppressive educational systems. Authors urge us to consider what it means to be empathic and to engage in the lives of those we serve. Their truths remind us to that standing still should never be an option.

The Negotiated Self

Employing Reflexive Inquiry to Explore Teacher Identity

Edited by Ellyn Lyle

Teacher identity resides in the foundational beliefs and assumptions educators have about teaching and learning. These beliefs and assumptions develop both inside and outside of the classroom, blurring the lines between the professional and the personal. Examining the development of teacher identity at this intersection requires a unique reflexive capacity.

Reflexive inquiry is both established and continually emerging. At its most basic, reflexivity refers to researchers’ consciousness of their role in and effect on both the act of doing research and arriving at research findings. In making central the role of the researcher in the research process, reflexive inquiry interrogates agency while examining philosophical notions about the nature of knowledge.

While advancements have been made in investigating the relationship between teacher knowledge and teacher practice, the research often fails to connect this meaning with self-knowledge and issues of identity. Through a consideration of these tenets, the authors in this collection embrace critical, qualitative, creative, and arts-integrated approaches to examine ways that reflexive inquiry supports studies in teacher identity. Moving between theory and lived experience, the authors individually and collectively lay bare teacher identity as negotiated while evidencing the epistemological merits of reflexive inquiry.

Disrupting Shameful Legacies

Girls and Young Women Speaking Back through the Arts to Address Sexual Violence

Series:

Edited by Claudia Mitchell and Relebohile Moletsane

Much has been written in Canada and South Africa about sexual violence in the context of colonial legacies, particularly for Indigenous girls and young women. While both countries have attempted to deal with the past through Truth and Reconciliation Commissions and Canada has embarked upon its National Inquiry on Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls, there remains a great deal left to do. Across the two countries, history, legislation and the lived experiences of young people, and especially girls and young women point to a deeply rooted situation of marginalization. Violence on girls’ and women’s bodies also reflects violence on the land and especially issues of dispossession. What approaches and methods would make it possible for girls and young women, as knowers and actors, especially those who are the most marginalized, to influence social policy and social change in the context of sexual violence?

Taken as a whole, the chapters in Disrupting Shameful Legacies: Girls and Young Women Speaking Back through the Arts to Address Sexual Violence which come out of a transnational study on sexual violence suggest a new legacy, one that is based on methodologies that seek to disrupt colonial legacies, by privileging speaking up and speaking back through the arts and visual practice to challenge the situation of sexual violence. At the same time, the fact that so many of the authors of the various chapters are themselves Indigenous young people from either Canada or South Africa also suggests a new legacy of leadership for change.

Creativities in Arts Education, Research and Practice

International Perspectives for the Future of Learning and Teaching

Series:

Edited by Leon R. de Bruin, Pamela Burnard and Susan Davis

In Creativities in Arts Education, Research and Practice: International Perspectives for the Future of Learning and Teaching, Leon de Bruin, Pamela Burnard and Susan Davis provide new thinking, ideas and practices concerned with philosophically, pedagogically and actively developing arts learning and teaching. Interrogating successes and challenges for creativity education locally/globally/glocally, and using illustrative cases and examples drawn from education, practice and research, they explore unique local practices, agendas, glocalised perspectives and ways arts learning develops diverse creativities in order to produce new approaches and creative ecologies through inter- and cross-disciplinary teaching practices interconnecting beyond arts domains. This book highlights innovative approaches and perspectives to activating and promoting diverse creativities as new forms of authorship and analytic approaches within arts practice and education, along with the production of adaptable, sustainable pedagogies that promote and produce diverse creativities differently. This book will help educators, artists, and researchers understand and fully utilise ways they can transform their thinking and practice and keep their learning and teaching on the move.



Contributors are: Christine Bottrell, Pamela Burnard, Peter Cook. Susan Davis, Elizabeth Dobson, Leon R. de Bruin, Tatjana Dragovic, Martin Fautley, Robyn Heckenberg, Susanne Jasilek, Fiona King, Sharon Lierse, Shari Lindblom, Megan McPherson, Sarah Jane Moore, Amy Mortimer, Alison O'Grady, Mark Selkrig, Susan Wright.

Paul Dash

This book deals with the issue of African Caribbean pupil invisibility in the art and design classroom. As such it addresses African Caribbean pupil invisibility in almost any teaching and learning context. The book argues that the slave trade, which ruptured their continuities with an African past, continues to impact on the learning of such pupils relative to others. In seeking to explicate this matter, the book places African Caribbean pupils in the wider context of African, Caribbean and Western cultural identities. Just where do they belong? To address this matter, it calls on the theorising of thinkers with an interest in identity construction, learning and belonging particularly with reference to the Caribbean. The book is organised in three sections, the first presents the rationale for the enquiry; the second outlines the outcome from a small research project with a focus on African Caribbean learners in the art and design classroom, and the third reflects on key issues that emerged from the research in relation to the rationale. The book ends by offering possibilities for developing African Caribbean teaching and learning in art and design.

African Caribbean Pupils in Art Education is very erudite and the centre of a world of reference and allusion - Dash relates its arguments and insights to many different writers and contexts. These will lead readers to many other writers and their arguments in related fields of study personalised research - interviews with teachers and students, adds realism and close-to-the-bone insight to the points Dash makes. These interviews are not 'academised' and made tedious or uninteresting, but real life and real classroom and curriculum issues come out clearly and undisguisedly in the subjects’ words. Many of their points are full of meaning and lucidity and add more power to Dash’s arguments.

Thus the book will be of real value to prospective teachers and teacher educators too, as a tool of learning and a stimulus for discussion. The book goes a long way beyond only being a text for Art Education students. It’s arguments have salience for all Educationalists and trainee teachers, as well as for staffrooms in Britain and North America (Canada and the U. S., for example). It deals with vital questions, both for African-Caribbean students and their white and Asian classmates, canvassing issues of intellectual and cultural confidence for African-Caribbean students and historical and contemporary truth for others.

Chris Searle, Director of the Ahmed Iqbal Ullah Race Relations Resource Centre at the University of Manchester.

Edited by Tracie Constantino and Boyd White

Essays on Aesthetic Education for the 21st Century, co-edited by Tracie Costantino and Boyd White, brings together an international collection of authors representing diverse viewpoints to engage in dialogue about the ongoing critical relevance of aesthetics for contemporary art education. Inspired by a conference symposium in which the four authors in the first section of the text, titled Initiating a Dialogue, explore a range of concepts including aesthetic experience, beauty, wonder, and aisthetics, this book enlarges the dialogue with eight additional chapters by authors from North America and Europe. In addition to chapters that address issues of social awareness, curriculum theory and research, and applications to practice with pre-service teachers, there are several chapters that acknowledge historical influences on current notions of aesthetics as a basis on which to open the gate into the twenty-first century. This book will be a valuable resource for graduate students in art education and curriculum studies, as well as practicing art educators, pre-service teachers, and anyone interested in the significance of aesthetics, not only in contemporary art education but the wider field of general education as well.

Roza Leikin, Abraham Berman and Boris Koichu

This book breaks through in the field of mathematical creativity and giftedness. It suggests directions for closing the gap between research in the field of mathematics education and research in the field of creativity and giftedness. It also outlines a research agenda for further research and development in the field.
The book consists of a balanced set of chapters by mathematicians, mathematics educators, educational psychologists and educational researchers. The authors of different chapters accept dynamic conception of creativity and giftedness.
The book provides analysis of cognitive, affective and social factors associated with the development of creativity in all students and with the realisation of mathematical talent in gifted students. It contains theoretical essays, research reports, historical overviews, recommendations for curricular design, and insights about promotion of mathematical creativity and giftedness at different levels.
The readers will find many examples of challenging mathematical problems intended at developing or examining mathematical creativity and giftedness as well as ideas for direct implementation in school and tertiary mathematics courses. They will also find theoretical models that can be used in researching students’ creativity and giftedness. Research reports enlighten relationships between excellence in mathematics and creativity and examine different aspects of inquiry-based environment as a powerful way for developing mathematical creativity in school students. The readers can also learn about characteristics of creativity of research mathematicians.

Poetic Inquiry

Vibrant Voices in the Social Sciences

Edited by Monica Prendergast, Carl Leggo and Pauline Sameshima

Poetic Inquiry: Vibrant Voices in the Social Sciences, co-edited by Monica Prendergast, Carl Leggo and Pauline Sameshima, features many of the foremost scholars working worldwide in aesthetic ways through poetry.
The contributors (from five countries) are all committed to the use of poetry as a way to collect data, analyze findings and represent understandings in multidisciplinary social science qualitative research investigations. The creativity and high aesthetic quality of the contributions found in the collection speak for themselves; they are truly, as the title indicates, "vibrant voices".
This groundbreaking collection will mark new territories in qualitative research and interpretive inquiry practices at an international level. Poetic Inquiry will contribute to many ongoing and energetic debates in arts-based research regarding issues of evaluation, aesthetics, ethics, activism, self-study, and practice-based research, while also spelling out some innovative ways of opening up these debates in creative and productive ways. Instructors and students will find the book a clear and comprehensive introduction to poetic inquiry as a research method.

The Quest for Meaning

Narratives of Teaching, Learning and the Arts

Edited by Mary Beattie

The Quest for Meaning: Teaching, Learning and the Arts presents a narrative, arts-based approach to pedagogy and research in higher education. Through narratives of experience, the book offers revealing, poignant examples of the transformative power of the arts and of narrative inquiry in learners’ lives, and of the centrality of story in their ongoing quest for meaning.
The Quest for Meaning will be valuable in a wide range of graduate and undergraduate settings. It provides a framework for the development of new pedagogies which integrate the theory and practice of narrative, arts-based approaches to education. The work makes a contribution to the fields of narrative and arts-based inquiry and pedagogy, qualitative research methods, holistic and integrated studies, and self-directed inquiry. It will appeal to a range of audiences who are interested in this creative, integrative approach to education, and who want to gain insights into how students learn, from their own unique perspectives.
Grounded in Dr. Beattie’s interconnected approach to research and pedagogy, the book begins with her own story of teaching, learning, research and the arts. This provides the backdrop to an account of a collaborative pedagogy designed to enable students to conduct in-depth narrative inquiries into their lives, and to learn how to do narrative, arts-based research with others. The author provides insights into the practices and processes of solitary and collaborative inquiry, and the interaction and integration that take place within the three kinds of dialogue she proposes; the dialogue with the self, the dialogue with others, and the dialogue between the dialogues.
The book’s other twelve narratives show from learners’ unique perspectives, how the creation and re-creation of their ways of ways of knowing and being is a distinctively individual process involving all aspects of their humanity. Individually, these narratives provide valuable glimpses into the challenges, the joys, the frustrations and emotionality, and the important personal satisfactions involved in the processes of learning, unlearning and re-learning. In their own voices, these learners tell of the diverse ways in which they became more responsive to their own inner lives, to the perspectives and understandings of others, and to the creation of more meaningful narratives for their current and future lives.
Collectively, the narratives highlight the importance of recognizing personal experience in settings of higher education. They also present compelling evidence for acknowledging the significance of inquiry, creativity, imagination, dialogue, interaction, and integration in enabling learners to bring the whole of their being to the learning process, to the exploration of the stories by which they live, and to the creation of new narratives for their future lives.