The Science of Religion: A Defence

Essays by Donald Wiebe

Series:

Donald Wiebe

Edited by Anthony Palma

Donald Wiebe, Professor of Philosophy of Religion at Trinity College, University of Toronto, has spent much of his academic career arguing for a clear demarcation between Theology and Religious Studies. The Science of Religion: A Defence offers a brilliant overview of Professor Wiebe's contributions on methodology in the academic study of religion, of the development of his thinking over time, and of his intellectual commitment to 'a science of religion'.

The work is divided into three parts. The first part identifies pertinent connections between 'religion', 'religious studies', and 'science' and why 'reductionism' in the academic study of religion, when properly applied, can bridge the explanatory gap between the sceptic and the devotee. The second part treats conceptual debates in the academic study of religion, with particular reference to the place of 'belief', 'understanding', and 'meaning' in the modern study of religion. The third part addresses the theological resistance to the scientific study of religion and how that resistance can be overcome. Finally, two new essays are included: a critique on ‘The Preconceptions of a Science of Religion’ by Anthony J. Palma, and an accompanying reply by Donald Wiebe.

The Science of Religion: A Defence is an essential resource for both scholarly and non-scholarly audiences alike, and will be of particular interest to both defenders and critics of a scientific study of religion.

Religions and Education in Antiquity

Studies in Honour of Michel Desjardins

Series:

Edited by Alex Damm

Religions and Education in Antiquity gathers ten essays on teaching and learning in the contexts of ancient Western religions, including Judaism, early Christianity and Gnostic Christian traditions. Beginning with an overview of religious education in the ancient Near Eastern and Mediterranean worlds, editor Alex Damm and the contributors together demonstrate the mutual influence of religion and education on each other; the relevance of educational traditions in addressing (for instance) historical or exegetical issues; and the thoroughgoing importance of education to religious life across time and space in antiquity. Highly useful to scholars of religion, theology, classics and education, this volume affords a state of the art study on pedagogy and learning in ancient religious contexts.

Editor-in-Chief Stephen G. Parker

Religion and education is a dynamic and increasingly important area of work, intersecting the fields of theology and religious studies, and drawing upon the foundation disciplines and methodologies of philosophy, sociology, psychology and history of education. It is particularly focused upon religious education as variously conceived in different domestic, religious, educational, social and national contexts. Brill Research Perspectives in Religion and Education provides researchers with the opportunity to give an account of the most recent scholarship and to define and direct the agenda for future research. Written as single or co-authored monographs with an accompanying bibliography, each specially commissioned issue contains a 50 to 100-page article on a given theme, offering a critical and up-to-date summary of research, commentary and analysis. As ‘religion and education’ grows in importance, this series will contribute to making knowledge accessible and debate internationally informed.

Forthcoming 2019
Volume 1, Issue 1: Religion and Education: Critically Mapping the Field, by Stephen G. Parker, Jenny Berglund, David Lewin, and Deirdre Raftery
Volume 1, Issue 2: Psychology and Religious Education, by Leslie J. Francis