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Aramaic Incantation Bowls in Museum Collections

Volume One: The Frau Professor Hilprecht Collection of Babylonian Antiquities, Jena

Series:

James Nathan Ford and Matthew Morgenstern

The Frau Professor Hilprecht Collection of Babylonian Antiquities at Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena houses one of the major European collections of incantation bowls. Forty bowls bear texts written in the Jewish, Manichaean Syriac or Mandaic scripts, and most of the rest (some twenty-five objects) in the Pahlavi script or in various pseudoscripts. The present volume comprises new editions of the Aramaic (and Hebrew) bowl texts based on high-resolution photographs taken by the authors, together with brief descriptions and photographs of the remaining material. New readings are often supported with close-up photographs. The volume is intended to serve as a basis for further study of magic in late Antiquity and of the Late Eastern Aramaic dialects in which the texts were composed.

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Nathaniel Berman

Nathaniel Berman’s Divine and Demonic in the Poetic Mythology of the Zohar: The “Other Side” of Kabbalah offers a new approach to the central work of Jewish mysticism, the Sefer Ha-Zohar (“Book of Radiance”). Berman explicates the literary techniques through which the Zohar constructs a mythology of intricately related divine and demonic personae. Drawing on classical and modern rhetorical paradigms, as well as psychoanalytical theories of the formation of subjectivity, Berman reinterprets the meaning of the Zohar’s divine and demonic personae, exploring their shared origins and their ongoing antagonisms and intimacies. Finally, he shows how the Zoharic portrayal of the demonic, the “Other Side,” contributes to reflecting on alterity of all kinds.

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Adam Afterman

In “And They Shall Be One Flesh”: On the Language of Mystical Union in Judaism, Adam Afterman offers an extensive study of mystical union and embodiment in Judaism. Afterman argues that Philo was the first to articulate the notion of unio mystica in Judaism and is the source of the henōsis mysticism in the later Neoplatonic tradition. The study provides a detailed analysis of the Jewish medieval trends that developed different forms of mystical union and mystical embodiment through the divine name and spirit. The book argues that the development of unitive mysticism in Judaism is the fruit of the creative synthesis of rabbinic Judaism and Hellenistic and Arab philosophy, and a natural outcome of the theological articulation of the idea of monotheism itself.

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Jonatan Meir

This book endeavors to fill a lacuna in the literature on early twentieth-century kabbalah, namely the lack of a comprehensive account of the traditional kabbalah seminaries (Yeshivot) in Jerusalem from 1896 to 1948 as well as the various manifestations of kabbalah within traditional Jewish society. The foundations that were laid in the early twentieth century also paved the way for the contemporary blossoming of kabbalah in many and manifold circles. In this sense, retracing the pertinent developments in Palestine at the outset of the twentieth century is imperative not only for repairing the distorted picture of the past, but for understanding the ongoing surge in kabbalah study.

Jerónimo Nadal (1507-1580) und der „verschriftlichte“ Ignatius

Die Konstruktion einer individuellen und kollektiven Identität

Series:

Ignacio Ramos Riera

Deutsch
Niemand ist mehr verantwortlich für die Entstehung jenes Denksystems, das auf Ignatius von Loyola (1491-1556) und seinen Exerzitien basiert, als Jerónimo Nadal. Ignacio Ramos legt in seiner Studie Jerónimo Nadal (1507-1580) und der „verschriftlichte“ Ignatius: Die Konstruktion einer individuellen und kollektiven Identität die ursprünglichen Konturen der sogenannten „ignatianischen“ Spiritualität dar. Es wird deutlich, wieviel Einfluss Nadal auf die Herausbildung des „Ignatianischen“ hatte.

Anhand Nadals lange verkannten Selbstzeugnisses (Chronicon Natalis) wird hermeneutisch herausgearbeitet, wie der gequälte Reifeprozess von Nadal originales Denken erzeugte – insbesondere in Bezug auf Ignatius.

An diese europäische Schlüsselgestalt des jungen Jesuitenordens heranzutreten, gewährt einen existentiell vermittelten Einblick in manche der gesellschaftlichen und philosophischen Spannungen (converso-Frage, Rolle der Vermittlungen...) z. Zt. des Humanismus und der großen Reformen.

English
Jerónimo Nadal plays a key role in the creation of the tradition of thought based on the person of Ignatius of Loyola (1491-1556) and his Spiritual Exercises. Ignacio Ramos’ book Jerónimo Nadal (1507-1580) und der „verschriftlichte“ Ignatius unveils the large percentage of too often overlooked “Nadalian” moments in the origins of “Ignatian” Spirituality.

Leaning on Nadal’s autobiographical account ( Chronicon Natalis, fully translated) the author deploys a hermeneutical method to show how Nadal´s stressful maturation process became a source of original thought, especially regarding Ignatius.

The reader will gain an existentially mediated insight into some of the social and philosophical hot spots (converso question, role of mediations...) of Humanism and the reformation era.

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Edited by Hava Tirosh-Samuelson and Aaron W. Hughes

Arthur Green is Rector of the post-denominational Rabbinical School and Irving Brudnick Professor of Jewish Philosophy and Religion at Hebrew College in Newton, Massachusetts. Originally ordained as a Conservative rabbi, Green considers himself a neo-Hasidic Jew, identifying with none of the established Jewish denominations. He combines historical knowledge of the Jewish mystical tradition with an original constructive theology. Recognized as both a rabbi and a scholar, Green has sought to make spiritual pursuit an essential part of committed Jewish life. Through scholarship, educational work, and popular teaching, he has contributed to the growth and vitality of Judaism in America and helped promote neo-Hasidism as Jewish spirituality for the 21st century.

The Value of the Particular: Lessons from Judaism and the Modern Jewish Experience

Festschrift for Steven T. Katz on the Occasion of his Seventieth Birthday

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Edited by Michael Zank and Ingrid Anderson

In this tribute to Steven T. Katz on the occasion of his seventieth birthday, Michael Zank and Ingrid Anderson present sixteen original essays written by senior and junior scholars in comparative religion, philosophy of religion, modern Judaism, and theology after the Holocaust, fields of inquiry where Steven Katz made major contributions over the course of his distinguished scholarly career.

The authors of this volume, specialists in Jewish history, especially the modern experience, and Jewish thought from the Bible to Buber, offer theoretical and practical observations on the value of the particular. Contributions range from Tim Knepper’s reevaluation of the ineffability discourse to the particulars of the Settlement Cookbook, examined by Nora Rubel as an American classic.

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Edited by Hava Tirosh-Samuelson and Aaron W. Hughes

Elliot R. Wolfson is Professor of Religious Studies and the Marsha and Jay Glazer Chair of Jewish Studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara. A scholar of Jewish mysticism and philosophy, he uses the textual sources of Judaism to examine universal philosophical topics such as the function and processes of the imagination, the paradoxes of temporality, and the mystery of poetic language. Working at the intersection of disciplines and refusing to reduce texts to their simple historical contexts, Wolfson puts texts spanning diverse temporal, cultural, and religious periods in creative counterpoint. His sensitivity to language reveals its fragility as it simultaneously points to the uncertainty of meaning. The result is a creative reading of both Judaism and philosophy that informs and is informed by poetic sensibility and philosophical hermeneutics.

Time and Eternity in Jewish Mysticism

That Which is Before and That Which is After

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Edited by Brian Ogren

Time and eternity are concepts that have occupied an important place within Jewish mystical thought. This present volume gives pride of place to these concepts, and is one of the first works to bring together diverse voices on the subject. It offers a multivalent picture of the topic of time and eternity, not only by including contributions from an array of academics who are leaders in their fields, but by proposing six diverse approaches to time and eternity in Jewish mysticism: the theoretical approach to temporality, philosophical definitions, the idea of time and pre-existence, the idea of historical time, the idea of experiential time, and finally, the idea of eternity beyond time. This multivocal treatment of Jewish mysticism and time as based on variant academic approaches is novel, and it should lay the groundwork for further discussion and exploration.

Aramaic Bowl Spells

Jewish Babylonian Aramaic Bowls Volume One

Series:

Shaul Shaked, James Nathan Ford and Siam Bhayro

The corpus of Aramaic incantation bowls from Sasanian Mesopotamia is perhaps the most important source we have for studying the everyday beliefs and practices of the Jewish, Christian, Mandaean, Manichaean, Zoroastrian and Pagan communities on the eve of the Islamic conquests. The bowls are from the Schøyen Collection, which has some 650 texts in different varieties of Aramaic: Jewish Aramaic, Mandaic and Syriac, and forms the largest collection of its kind anywhere in the world. This volume presents editions of sixty-four Jewish Aramaic incantation bowls, with accompanying introductions, translations, philological notes, photographs and indices. The themes covered include the magical divorce and the accounts of the wonder-working sages Ḥanina ben Dosa and Joshua bar Peraḥia. It is the first of a multi-volume project that aims to publish the entire Schøyen Collection of Aramaic incantation bowls.