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The Development of the Biblical Hebrew vowels

Including a Concise Historical Morphology

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Benjamin Suchard

The development of the Biblical Hebrew Vowels investigates the sound changes affecting the Proto-Northwest-Semitic vocalic phonemes and their reflexes in Tiberian Biblical Hebrew. Contrary to many previous approaches, Benjamin Suchard shows that these developments can all be described as phonetically regular sound laws. This confirms that despite its unique transmission history, Hebrew behaves like other languages in this regard. Many Hebrew sound changes have traditionally been explained as reflecting non-phonetic conditioning. These include the Canaanite Shift of *ā to *ō, tonic and pre-tonic lengthening, diphthong contraction, Philippi’s Law, the Law of Attenuation, and the apocope of short, unstressed vowels. By reconsidering reconstructions and re-evaluating phonetic conditions, this work shows how the Biblical Hebrew forms regularly derive from their Proto-Northwest-Semitic precursors.

Handbook of Jewish Languages

Revised and Updated Edition

Edited by Lily Kahn and Aaron D. Rubin

This Handbook of Jewish Languages is an introduction to the many languages used by Jews throughout history, including Yiddish, Judezmo (Ladino) , and Jewish varieties of Amharic, Arabic, Aramaic, Berber, English, French, Georgian, Greek, Hungarian, Iranian, Italian, Latin American Spanish, Malayalam, Occitan (Provençal), Portuguese, Russian, Swedish, Syriac, Turkic (Karaim and Krymchak), Turkish, and more. Chapters include historical and linguistic descriptions of each language, an overview of primary and secondary literature, and comprehensive bibliographies to aid further research. Many chapters also contain sample texts and images. This book is an unparalleled resource for anyone interested in Jewish languages, and will also be very useful for historical linguists, dialectologists, and scholars and students of minority or endangered languages. This paperback edition has been updated to include dozens of additional bibliographic references.

Series:

Edited by Lily Kahn and Aaron D. Rubin

This Handbook of Jewish Languages is an introduction to the many languages used by Jews throughout history, including Yiddish, Judezmo (Ladino) , and Jewish varieties of Amharic, Arabic, Aramaic, Berber, English, French, Georgian, Greek, Hungarian, Iranian, Italian, Latin American Spanish, Malayalam, Occitan (Provençal), Portuguese, Russian, Swedish, Syriac, Turkic (Karaim and Krymchak), Turkish, and more. Chapters include historical and linguistic descriptions of each language, an overview of primary and secondary literature, and comprehensive bibliographies to aid further research. Many chapters also contain sample texts and images. This book is an unparalleled resource for anyone interested in Jewish languages, and will also be very useful for historical linguists, dialectologists, and scholars and students of minority or endangered languages.

This book is also available as paperback version.

The Verbal System of the Dead Sea Scrolls

Tense, Aspect, and Modality in Qumran Hebrew Texts

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Ken M. Penner

In The Verbal System of the Dead Sea Scrolls Ken M. Penner determines whether Qumran Hebrew finite verbs are primarily temporal, aspectual, or modal.
Standard grammars claim Hebrew was aspect-prominent in the Bible, and tense-prominent in the Mishnah. But the semantic value of the verb forms in the intervening period in which the Dead Sea Scrolls were written has remained controversial.
Penner answers the question of Qumran Hebrew verb form semantics using an empirical method: a database calculating the correlation between each form and each function, establishing that the ancient author’s selection of verb form is determined not by aspect, but by tense or modality. Penner then applies these findings to controversial interpretations of three Qumran texts.

Edited by Outi Bat-El

The joint enterprise between research in theoretical linguistics and the acquisition of phonology and morphology is the focus of this volume, which provides fresh data from Hebrew, evaluates old issues and addresses new ones. The volume includes articles on segmental phonology (vowel harmony and consonant harmony), prosodic phonology (the prosodic word, onsets and codas), and phonological errors in spelling. It attempts to bridge the gap between phonology and morphology with articles on the development of filler syllables and the effect of phonology on the development of verb inflection. It also addresses morphology, as well as the development of morphological specification and the assignment of gender in L2 Hebrew. The data are drawn from typically and atypically developing children, using longitudinal and cross-sectional experimental methods.

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Edited by Nadia Vidro, Irene E. Zwiep and Judith Olszowy-Schlanger

A Universal Art. Hebrew Grammar Across Disciplines and Faiths reflects on medieval and early modern Hebrew linguistics as a discipline that crossed geographic and religious borders and linked up with a plethora of scholarly activities, from Judaeo-Arabic Bible translations to the Renaissance search for the holiest alphabet. This collection of articles presents a cross-section of new research avenues on Hebraism, Karaite, Rabbanite and Christian, with an emphasis on the transmission of linguistic ideas through time and space among different communities, cultures and religious currents. The resulting picture is one of intrinsic variation and dynamic growth as opposed to the linear paradigm of development, culmination and stagnation current in the historiography of Hebrew linguistics.

Edited by Geoffrey Khan, Shmuel Bolozky, Steven E. Fassberg, Gary A. Rendsburg, Aaron D. Rubin, Ora R. Schwarzwald and Tamar Zewi

The Hebrew language has one of the longest attested histories of any of the world’s languages, with records of its use from antiquity until modern times. Although it ceased to be a spoken language by the 2nd century C.E., Hebrew continued to be used and to develop in the form of a literary and liturgical language until its revival as a vernacular in the 20th century.
In a four volume set, complete with index, the Encyclopedia of Hebrew Language and Linguistics offers a systematic and comprehensive treatment of all aspects of the history and study of the Hebrew language from its earliest attested form to the present day. The encyclopedia contains overview articles that provide a readable synopsis of current knowledge of the major periods and varieties of the Hebrew language as well as thematically-organized entries which provide further information on individual topics, such as the Hebrew of various sources (texts, manuscripts, inscriptions, reading traditions), major grammatical features (phonology, morphology, and syntax), lexicon, script and paleography, theoretical linguistic approaches, and so forth. With over 950 entries and approximately 400 contributing scholars, the Encyclopedia of Hebrew Language and Linguistics is the authoritative reference work for students and researchers in the fields of Hebrew linguistics, general linguistics, Biblical studies, Hebrew and Jewish literature, and related fields.

The online version of the EHLL can be found here.

Grammatica van het Bijbels Hebreeuws and Leerboek van het Bijbels Hebreeuws (2 vols)

Twaalfde, herziene editie door M.F.J. Baasten en W.Th. van Peursen

J.P. Lettinga, Martin Baasten and Wido Th. van Peursen

Deze Grammatica biedt een overzicht van de beginselen van het Bijbels Hebreeuws. Het werk is in eerste instantie geschreven voor de beginnende student, maar is eveneens nuttig voor gevorderden. Het boek heeft ruime aandacht voor de historische ontwikkeling van het Bijbels Hebreeuws en bevat een uitvoerige behandeling van de syntaxis. De Grammatica is ook bedoeld als naslagwerk naast het bijbehorende Leerboek van het Bijbels Hebreeuws, waarin de stof in zorgvuldig opgebouwde lessen didactisch verantwoord wordt aangeboden.

Deze twaalfde editie is geheel herzien en in overeenstemming gebracht met recente inzichten in de hebraïstiek en de taalkunde; zij bevat een aanzienlijk aantal aanvullingen en verbeteringen ten opzichte van de elfde editie (2000).

Bij bestelling van meer dan 8 sets tegelijk ontvangt u 15% korting.

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This Grammar offers an overview of Biblical Hebrew. It is mainly aimed at beginning students, but contains much of value for advanced study. Ample attention is paid to the historical development of the language and an an extensive, up-to-date description of Hebrew syntax is offered. This Grammar is meant to be used alongside the accompanying Textbook of Biblical Hebrew, which contains carefully graded lessons, exercises, Biblical texts, as well as an annotated inscription. In addition, it offers a glossary, verbal paradigms and an elaborate list of grammatical terms, with examples taken from Dutch and English.

The twelfth edition has been thoroughly revised on many points and contains numerous additions and corrections to the eleventh edition (2000).

You will receive 15% discount on orders of more than 8 sets.

Reading Academic Hebrew

An Advanced Learner's Handbook

Nitza Krohn

Through straightforward exposition of rules, numerous examples from scholarly texts, and models demonstrating how to use linguistic information in the text as clues to meaning, the book articulates the grammatical and semantic knowledge that native Hebrew readers bring to the task of reading complex academic prose. It is aimed at students and researchers in the field of Jewish Studies who wish to access seminal and recent Hebrew language scholarship in their area of expertise, as well as those preparing for a Hebrew to English translation exam. The book includes exercises with solutions and practice texts for comprehension and translation, and can be used as a course textbook, a self-study manual and/or a reference source for Hebrew teachers.

"It is to help the student navigate the gulf between spoken Hebrew and academic prose that Nitza Krohn has produced a very important and useful volume...The book is a valuable resource for students and teachers alike."
Jonathan Paradise, University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire