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Edited by Claire Clivaz, Paul Dilley and David Hamidović

The volume presents a selection of research projects in Digital Humanities applied to the “Biblical Studies” in the widest sense and context, including Early Jewish and Christian studies, hence the title “Ancient Worlds”. Taken as a whole, the volume explores the emergent Digital Culture at the beginning of the 21st century. It also offers many examples which attest to a change of paradigm in the textual scholarship of “Ancient Worlds”: categories are reshaped; textuality is (re-) investigated according to its relationships with orality and visualization; methods, approaches and practices are no longer a fixed conglomeration but are mobilized according to their contexts and newly available digital tools.

Series:

Edited by Claire Clivaz, Andrew Gregory and David Hamidović

Ancient texts, once written by hand on parchment and papyrus, are now increasingly discoverable online in newly digitized editions, and their readers now work online as well as in traditional libraries. So what does this mean for how scholars may now engage with these texts, and for how the disciplines of biblical, Jewish and Christian studies might develop? These are the questions that contributors to this volume address. Subjects discussed include textual criticism, palaeography, philology, the nature of ancient monotheism, and how new tools and resources such as blogs, wikis, databases and digital publications may transform the ways in which contemporary scholars engage with historical sources. Contributors attest to the emergence of a conscious recognition of something new in the way that we may now study ancient writings, and the possibilities that this new awareness raises.

Reading Academic Hebrew

An Advanced Learner's Handbook

Nitza Krohn

Through straightforward exposition of rules, numerous examples from scholarly texts, and models demonstrating how to use linguistic information in the text as clues to meaning, the book articulates the grammatical and semantic knowledge that native Hebrew readers bring to the task of reading complex academic prose. It is aimed at students and researchers in the field of Jewish Studies who wish to access seminal and recent Hebrew language scholarship in their area of expertise, as well as those preparing for a Hebrew to English translation exam. The book includes exercises with solutions and practice texts for comprehension and translation, and can be used as a course textbook, a self-study manual and/or a reference source for Hebrew teachers.

"It is to help the student navigate the gulf between spoken Hebrew and academic prose that Nitza Krohn has produced a very important and useful volume...The book is a valuable resource for students and teachers alike."
Jonathan Paradise, University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire