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Judaism and Islam One God One Music

The History of Jewish Paraliturgical Song in the Context of Arabo-Islamic Culture as Revealed in Its Jewish Babylonian Sources

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Merav Rosenfeld-Hadad

In Judaism and Islam One God One Music, Merav Rosenfeld-Hadad offers the first substantial study of the history and nature of the Jewish Paraliturgical Song, which developed in the Arabo-Islamic civilization between the tenth and the twentieth centuries.

Commonly portrayed as clashing cultures, Judaism and Islam appear here as complementary and enriching religio-cultural sources for the Paraliturgical Song’s texts and music, poets and musicians, as well as the worshippers.

Relying chiefly on the Babylonian-Jewish written sources of the genre, Rosenfeld-Hadad gives a fascinating historical account of one thousand years of the rich and vibrant cultural and religious life of Middle Eastern Judaism that endured in Arabo-Islamic settings. She convincingly proves that the Jewish Paraliturgical Song, like its people, reflects a harmonious hybridization of Jewish and Arabo-Islamic aesthetics and ideas.

Arab-Jewish Literature

The Birth and Demise of the Arabic Short Story

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Reuven Snir

In Arab-Jewish Literature: The Birth and Demise of the Arabic Short Story, Reuven Snir offers an account of the emergence of the art of the Arabic short story among the Arabized Jews during the 1920s, especially in Iraq and Egypt, its development in the next two decades, until the emigration to Israel after 1948, and the efforts to continue the literary writing in Israeli society, the shift to Hebrew, and its current demise. The stories discussed in the book reflect the various stages of the development of Arab-Jewish identity during the twentieth century and are studied in the relevant updated theoretical and literary contexts. An anthology of sixteen translated stories is also included as an appendix to the book.

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Edited by Sjef Houppermans, Manet van Montfrans, Annelies Schulte Nordholt, Sabine van Wesemael and Nell de Hullu-van Doeselaar

Ce volume comporte un dossier sur la thématique de l’argent dans A la recherche du temps perdu. Chez Proust, l’argent est beaucoup plus que l’argent, il devient véhicule de passion, de pulsion, d’excès. Loin de se limiter à la dimension sociologique du roman, il joue un rôle à d’autres niveaux : esthétique, imaginaire mais surtout affectif, dans le motif récurrent du don. Dans une série de huit études, le dossier éclaire les diverses facettes de cet imaginaire de l’argent, qui s’infiltre dans les relations humaines ainsi que dans l’art.
Dans la section mélanges, on trouvera des études sur le Paris proustien, sur les objets et les arts décoratifs dans la Recherche et sur l’amitié de Proust avec Robert de Flers.

The greater part of this issue is devoted to the topic of money in the Recherche. In Proust’s work, money is so much more, it is the vehicle of passions, impulses and excess. Apart from its sociological references, money plays a role at other levels of the novel: the aesthetic, the imaginary and above all the affective dimension, with the recurrent motive of gift. With a series of eight studies, the present issue throws a light on this imaginary of money, which infuses human relations and art.
The Miscellanea section includes studies about Proust’s Paris, about art objects and decorative arts in the Recherche and on Proust’s friendship with Robert de Flers.

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Edited by Malena Chinski and Alan Astro

Splendor, Decline, and Rediscovery of Yiddish in Latin America presents Yiddish culture as it developed in an area seldom associated with the language. Yet several countries—Argentina, Brazil, Cuba, Mexico and Uruguay—became centers for Yiddish literature, journalism, political activism, theater, and music. Chapters by historians, linguists, and literary critics explore the flourishing of Yiddish there in the early 20th century, its retraction in the 1960’s, and contemporary endeavors to rescue this marginalized legacy.



Topics discussed in the volume include the literary figures of the “Jewish gaucho” and the peddler; the regional Yiddish press; the communal struggle against trafficking in women; cultural responses to the Holocaust; intra-Jewish conflict during the Cold War; debates on assimilation versus tradition; and emergent postvernacular Yiddish.