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In Verbal Aspect in Old Church Slavonic Jaap Kamphuis demonstrates that the aspect system of Old Church Slavonic can best be described if one divides the verbs into three main categories: perfective, imperfective and anaspectual. This differs from the traditional division into perfective and imperfective verbs only. To support the categorization, the study contains a corpus-based quantitative and qualitative analysis of the available Old Church Slavonic data. This analysis contributes to a better understanding of the development of aspect in Slavic. Kamphuis shows that aspect in Old Church Slavonic functions more like verbal aspect in the Western groups of Slavic languages (e.g. Czech) than like that in the Eastern group (e.g. Russian).
Belgrade, August 20-27, 2018.
Every five years, on the occasion of the International Congress of Slavists, a volume appears that presents a comprehensive overview of current Slavic linguistic research in the Netherlands. Like its predecessors, the present collection covers a variety of topics: Bulgarian and Polish aspectology (Barentsen, Genis), Slavic historical linguistics (Kortlandt, Vermeer), pragmatics of tense usage in Old Russian (Dekker), dialect description (Houtzagers), L2 acquisition (Tribushinina & Mak), Russian foreigners’ speech imitation (Peeters & Arkema), corpus-based semantics (Fortuin & Davids) and theoretical work on negation (Keijsper, Van Helden). As can be seen from this list, the majority of the contributions in this peer-reviewed volume displays the data-oriented tradition of Dutch Slavic linguistics, but studies of a more theoretical nature are also represented.
This study is devoted to a corpus of Old Russian letters, written on pieces of birchbark. These unique texts from Novgorod and surroundings give us an exceptional impression of everyday life in medieval Russian society. In this study, the birchbark letters are addressed from a pragmatic angle. Linguistic parameters are identified that shed light on the degree to which literacy had gained ground in communicative processes. It is demonstrated that the birchbark letters occupy an intermediate position between orality and literacy. On the one hand, oral habits of communication persisted, as reflected in how the birchbark letters are phrased; on the other hand, literate modes of expression emerged, as seen in the development of normative conventions and literate formulae.
The Prehistory of the Balto-Slavic Accent has been written to fill a gap. The interested non-specialist can easily learn about the complex accent systems of the individual Baltic and Slavic languages and how they relate to each other. But the reader interested in the Proto-Balto-Slavic parent system, and how it evolved from the very different system of Proto-Indo-European, has few reliable places to turn. The goal of this book is to provide an accentological interface between Indo-European and Balto-Slavic—to identify and explain the accent shifts and other early changes that give the earliest stages of Baltic and Slavic their distinctive prosodic cast.
Editors: Sijmen Tol and René Genis
Within international linguistics, the study of Slavic languages enjoys considerable interest. The extensive coverage of Slavic languages in the Linguistic Bibliography is evidence of this. The Bibliography of Slavic Linguistics, 2000-2014 brings together the details of over 67,000 unique publications, carefully selected, classified, cross-referenced and indexed by professional bibliographers: it gives a complete overview of the field of studies since the beginning of this century. All contributing bibliographers are specialized Slavists themselves, guaranteeing the quality of the descriptions and annotations. The selection includes over thirty publication languages including publications in Finnish, Estonian, Greek, Albanian, Dutch, English, German, Japanese, Hebrew as well as other languages. Marc L. Greenberg’s Introduction gives an overview of the state of scholarship in Slavic linguistics and the directions in which the field is headed. The 3 volumes are thematically and geographically ordered in the sections General, Slavic, South Slavic, West Slavic and East Slavic. All references are classified according to a sophisticated classification scheme (over 100 subject classes), refined with an extensive language and subject keyword index.

Key features:
• Over 67,000 records;
• Covering all Slavic languages including minor and even extinct ones e.g. Bosnian, Pomeranian, Rusyn, High and Low Sorbian as well as Church Slavonic;
• Titles are given in their original languages, with translations provided whenever relevant;
• Titles in Cyrillic script are uniformly transcribed in Latin script according to current scientific standards.
mit der kommentierten Belegsammlung der Aoristformen und Formen des präteritalen passiven Partizipiums im Altkirchenslavischen
Die Vorgeschichte des slavischen Aoristsystems proposes a new look on the paradigmatic organization of the finite verb in Proto-Slavic. It rests on the study of the diachronic and synchronic conditioning of paradigmatic preferences of Proto-Slavic primary verbs and is shown to account for the complementary distribution of partially syncretistic aorist stem formations into six classes (bases of the systematic description adopted here). Major development trends reveal clear parallels with other Indo-European branches. Along with the discussion of paradigmatic constellations, diachronic background, etymology and grammar, the work comprises a nearly complete attestation of aorists and past participles of primary verbs including prefixal compounds in canonic OCS and those outside the canon, and is designed as an extensive reference book both for Indo-Europeanists and Slavists.

Die Vorgeschichte des slavischen Aoristsystems bietet eine neue systematische Beschreibung des älteren gemeinslavischen Verbalsystems aus synchroner und diachroner Perspektive. Im Zentrum steht die nahezu vollständige Erfassung und Bewertung der Aoristformen des Altkirchenslavischen. Sie erscheinen hier in neuer paradigmatischer Klassifikation (in sechs Klassen), mit ausführlicher Dokumentation ihrer Beleglage und ihrer synchronischen Oppositionen (: Präsens- und Infinitivstämmen, Partizipien). Die systematische und historische Konditionierung der paradigmatischen Präferenzen primärer Verbalstammbildungen wird neu beleuchtet.
Ihre sprachgeschichtliche Verankerung wird im Vergleich mit inner- und außerslavischen Entsprechungen nach dem aktuellen Stand – unter Einschluss der Prosodie – dargestellt. Das Buch eignet sich als Referenzorgan zum slavischen Verbum für Slavisten, Indoeuropäisten und allgemeine Sprachwissenschaftler.
This dictionary in the Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series systematically and exhaustively deals with the Slavic inherited lexicon. It is unique in combining recent insights from the field of comparative Indo-European linguistics with modern Balto-Slavic accentology. In addition, the author makes an explicit attempt at reconstructing part of the Balto-Slavic lexicon.
The entries of the dictionary are alphabetically arranged Proto-Slavic etyma. Each lemma consists of a number of fields which contain the evidence, reconstructions and notes. The introduction explains the contents and the significance of the individual fields. Here the reader can also find information on the various sources of the material. The volume concludes with an extensive bibliography of sources and secondary literature, and a word index.
Cliticization and Related Phenomena
The theoretical domain of investigation of this volume is the nature of the syntax-phonology interface. The empirical domain of investigation is cliticization in South Slavic. The volume also examines several phenomena that raise theoretical issues related to those involved in South Slavic cliticization, namely, multiple wh-fronting in Slavic and Romanian, Germanic V-2, object shift and stylistic fronting in Scandinavian, and negation in Romance. The central theoretical questions considered in the volume are how syntax and phonology interact with each other and whether PF can affect word order. It is argued that PF does affect word order, but not through actual PF movement. The volume makes new proposals concerning the structural representation of clitics and the nature of clitic clustering. It also provides an account of the second position effect and teases apart the role of syntax and phonology in cliticization and the second position phenomenon.
Studies in Slavic and General Linguistics is mainly devoted to the field of descriptive linguistics. Although the series is primarily intended to be a means of publication for linguists from the Low Countries, the editors are pleased to accept contributions by linguists from abroad.
Studies in Slavic and General Linguistics appears at irregular intervals, but the Editors aim at bringing out an average one volume a year.