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Karl Rahner and the Contemporary Exploration for Meaning
In Theology, Empowerment, and Prison Ministry Meins G.S. Coetsier offers a new scholarly account of Karl Rahner’s theological anthropology and the prison pastorate with a contemporary expansion for meaning, seeking an antidote to the suffering and isolation of those incarcerated with a “theology of empowerment.” Drawing on prison ministry theorists and practitioners, and on the experiences of Viktor Frankl, Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn and Etty Hillesum, the book argues that Rahner’s views on prison ministry are significant and encouraging but limited regarding the needs and demands of 21st-century prison ministry. In a convincing, perceptive, and groundbreaking study, Coetsier goes beyond Rahner with ecumenical and interreligious perspectives, reminding us all of our human dignity, of meaning and transformation, of our liberation, creativity, hope and community.
This volume explores issues and themes related to violence against women. It is distinctive in two ways. First, the editors have convened an international cohort of contributing scholars, whose assessment of the pervasiveness and urgency of the problems and their proposals for solutions derives from their pneumatology: their theology of the Holy Spirit. Second, this book represents quite simply the first sustained effort to bring together in one volume Pentecostal voices from a variety of academic disciplines, ecclesial traditions, and cultural situations to address the urgent issues associated with violence toward women.
Author: Sam Mickey
New Materialism and Theology reflects on questions of human embodiment, nonhuman agency, technological innovation, and what really matters now and in possible futures. Bringing theological inquiry together with the philosophical movement of new materialism, Sam Mickey points toward a variety of ways for thinking about matter and everything that materializes in human and more-than-human worlds. Mickey provides introductory definitions and historical context for understanding the relationship between various theological and materialist ideas and practices. He examines the self-declared novelty and materiality of new materialism, noting the limitations of those labels while articulating the very new and quite material challenges that new materialism does indeed pose, challenges of urgent existential importance that demand theological responses. New Materialism and Theology faces the theological implications and material possibilities facing humanity while ecological and technological realities seem to be pointing toward posthuman or transhuman futures or perhaps something else entirely.
Editor-in-Chief: Zhi CHEN
This is a peer-reviewed, inclusive, non-Eurocentric, multi-disciplinary book series devoted to the interdisciplinary study of ancient civilizations from all continents.
- ALAC is fully-funded by the Research Centre For History and Culture (RCHC). All volumes are published under a CC BY-NC-ND license.
- Proposals must present original work and must have been submitted exclusively to ALAC. Both monographs and edited volumes are welcome.
- Submissions may regard any civilizations from any continents, developed between prehistory and the 15th century AD, that is, the fall of the Eastern Roman Empire.
- Submissions may regard any aspects of Antiquity: history, archaeology, art and architecture, philology, linguistics, literature, philosophy, religion studies, sociology, anthropology, etc.
- ALAC also considers studies of oral literature, such as proverbs and folklore, as well as field work on endangered languages, which represent the legacy of ancient traditions verbally transmitted from generation to generation.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and full manuscripts by email to the Series Editors: Professor CHEN Zhi , Professor Carlotta Viti , and Dr WANG Xiang (Shawn Wang) .
The History, Theology, and Liturgy of the Eucharist in the Anglican Church of Australia
Author: Brian Douglas
In The Anglican Eucharist in Australia, Brian Douglas explores the History, Theology, and Liturgy of the Eucharist in the Anglican Church of Australia. The story begins with the first white settlement in 1788 and continues to the present day. The three eucharistic liturgies used in the ACA, and the debates that led to them, are examined in depth: The Book of Common Prayer (1662); An Australian Prayer Book (1978); and A Prayer Book for Australia (1995). The deep sacramentality of the Aboriginal people is acknowledged and modern issues such as liturgical development, lay presidency and virtual Eucharists are also explored. The book concludes with some suggestions for the further development of eucharistic liturgies within the ACA.
Associate Editors: Connie Au, Jörg Haustein, and Todd M. Johnson
The rise of Pentecostalism is one of the most important changes in Christianity in the past century. Growing rapidly, it has expanded throughout the world.
How many Pentecostals are there in the world? How did Pentecostalism grow so fast? What do Pentecostals believe? What role did revivals play like the Azusa Street Revival in the USA or the Mukti Mission Revival in India? What do Pentecostals experience when they speak in tongues, pray for healing, and seek prosperity?
Brill's Encyclopedia of Global Pentecostalism answers such questions, drawing upon disciplines such as anthropology, biblical studies, economics, gender studies, history, theology, and other areas of related interest.

The online version of the Encyclopedia is already available. See here.

• 42 important themes & topics in Pentecostalism
• Biographies of 138 historical figures
• 60 Pentecostal Movements & Organizations
• Development of Pentecostalism in 81 countries
• 5 Regional articles: Africa, Asia, Europe, Oceania, Latin-America
A Socio-Economic Analysis of a Religious Community in Eighteenth-Century Saxony
Based on hundreds of archival documents, Christina Petterson offers an in-depth analysis of the community building process and individual and collective subjectification practices of the Moravian Brethren in eighteenth-century Herrnhut, Eastern Germany between 1740 and 1760.
The Moravian Brethren are a Protestant group, but Petterson demonstrates the relevance of their social experiments and practices for early modernity by drawing out the socio-economic layers of the archival material. In doing so, she provides a non-religious reading of categories that become central to liberal ideology as the Moravians negotiate the transition from feudal society to early capitalism. As such The Moravian Brethren in a Time of Transition combines archival analysis with socio-economic change.
In Transatlantic Charismatic Renewal, c.1950-2000, Andrew Atherstone, Mark Hutchinson and John Maiden bring together leading researchers to examine one of the globally most important religious movements of the twentieth century. Variously referred to as the charismatic ‘renewal’ or ‘revival’, it was a key Christian response to globalization, modernity and secularization. Unlike other accounts (which focus either on denominational pentecostalism or charismatic phenomena outside the West), this volume describes transatlantic Christianity drawing deeply on its pneumatic roots to bring about renewal. New research in archives and overlooked journals illuminate key figures from David du Plessis to John Wimber, providing insights which challenge the standard interpretations of the charismatic movement’s origins and influence.
Co-edited by Shun-hing Chan and Jonathan Johnson, Citizens of Two Kingdoms examines the complex relationships of civil society, Christian organizations, and individual Christians in mainland China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, and Macau. Different authors investigate to what extent Christian organizations or individual Christians demonstrate the quality of civic virtues or virtual citizenship in the four regions, and reflect on the promises and difficulties of applying civil society theories to Chinese societies. Some authors focus their studies on the relationships in mainland China under the regime of Xi Jinping. Contributors include Richard Madsen, Zhidong Hao, Teresa Wright, Fredrik Fällman, Lauren F. Pfister, Lida V. Nedilsky, Mary Mee-Yin Yuen, Shun-hing Chan, Wen-ben Kuo, Yik-fai Tam, and Gerda Wielander.
An Anglican Practical Theology of Interreligious Marriage
In Intimate Diversity Paul Smith explores theological implications of interreligious marriage. Taking a practical theology approach which begins with lived experience and works through a pastoral cycle involving interpretation, normative discussion and a pragmatic outcome, the book challenges the Church of England (or other denominations) fulfil three tasks: theological, pastoral and missional.

Paul Smith accepts the reality of marriage that involves couples from different religious traditions and proposes ways of justifying such marriage based on normative Christian traditions. He takes a broadly missional approach, advocating the positive role that the Church of England can play in fostering good interreligious relations in society whilst offering sympathetic pastoral support of couples who marry across religious divides.