Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 13 items for :

  • Theology and World Christianity x
  • Early Modern Philosophy x
Clear All Modify Search
No Access

Series:

Rudolf Schuessler

In The Debate on Probable Opinions in the Scholastic Tradition, Rudolf Schuessler portrays scholastic approaches to a qualified disagreement of opinions. The book outlines how scholastic regulations concerning the use of opinions changed in the early modern era, giving rise to an extensive debate on the moral and epistemological foundations of reasonable disagreements. The debate was fueled by probabilism and anti-probabilism in Catholic moral theology and thus also serves as a gateway to these doctrines. All developments are outlined in historical context, while special attention is paid to the evolution of scholastic notions of probability and their importance for the emergence of modern probability.
No Access

Series:

Edited by Simon J.G. Burton, Joshua Hollmann and Eric M. Parker

List of Illustrations Abbreviations Notes on Contributors Nicholas of Cusa: The Life of a Reformer Simon J.G. Burton, Joshua Hollmann, and Eric M. Parker Introduction: Nicholas of Cusa and Early Modern Reform: towards a Reassessment Simon J.G. Burton, Joshua Hollmann, and Eric M. Parker Part 1 Reformatio Generalis: Ecclesiastical Reform 1 A Difficult Pope: Eugenius IV and the Men around Him Thomas M. Izbicki and Luke Bancroft 2 The Reform of Space for Prayer: Ecclesia primitiva in Nicholas of Cusa and Leon Battista Alberti Il Kim 3 “ Papista Insanissima”: Papacy and Reform in Nicholas of Cusa’s Reformatio Generalis (1459) and the Early Martin Luther (1517–19) Richard J. Serina, Jr. 4 Nicholas of Cusa and Paolo Sarpi: Copernicanism and Conciliarism in Early Modern Venice Alberto Clerici Part 2 Coincidentia Oppositorum: Theological Reform 5 Nicholas of Cusa and Martin Luther on Christ and the Coincidence of Opposites Joshua Hollmann 6 Ignorantia Non Docta: John Calvin and Nicholas of Cusa’s Neglected Trinitarian Legacy Gary W. Jenkins 7 Nicholas of Cusa and Pantheism in Early Modern Catholic Theology Matthew T. Gaetano Part 3 Explicatio Visionis: Reform of Perspective 8 The Notion of Faith in the Works of Nicholas Cusanus and Giordano Bruno Luisa Brotto 9 “The Sacred Circle of All- Being”: Cusanus, Lord Brooke, and Peter Sterry Eric M. Parker 10 Varieties of Spiritual Sense: Cusanus and John Smith Derek Michaud 11 Motion, Space, and Early Modern Re-formations of the Cosmos: Nicholas of Cusa’s Anima Mundi and Henry More’s Spirit of Nature Nathan R. Strunk Part 4 Mathesis Universalis: Reform of Method 12 Cusanus and Boethian Theology in the Early French Reform Richard J. Oosterhoff 13 Nicholas Cusanus and Guillaume Postel on Learning and Docta Ignorantia Roberta Giubilini 14 The Book Metaphor Triadized: the Layman’s Bible and God’s Books in Raymond of Sabunde, Nicholas of Cusa and Jan Amos Comenius Petr Pavlas 15 “Squaring the Circle”: Cusan Metaphysics and the Pansophic Vision of Jan Amos Comenius Simon J.G. Burton 16 Cusanus and Leibniz: Symbolic Explorations of Infinity as a Ladder to God Jan Makovský Epilogue: Ernst Cassirer and Renaissance Cultural Studies: the Figure of Nicholas of Cusa Michael Edward Moore Index
No Access

Series:

Maria-Cristina Pitassi and Daniela Solfaroli Camillocci

English Irena Backus' scholarship has been characterised by profound historical learning and philological acumen, extraordinary mastery of a wide range of languages, and broad-ranging interests. From the history of historiography to the story of Biblical exegesis and the reception of the Church Fathers, her research on the long sixteenth century stands as a point of reference for both historians of ideas and church historians alike. She also explored late medieval theology before turning her attention to the interplay of religion and philosophy in the seventeenth century, the focus of her late research. This volume assembles contributions from 35 international specialists that reflect the breadth of her interests and both illustrate and extend her path-breaking legacy as a scholar, teacher and colleague.

Français La recherche d’Irena Backus témoigne d’une culture historique et philologique étendue, de son impeccable maîtrise des instruments linguistiques et de la multiplicité de ses centres d’intérêt. Ses études sont aujourd’hui une référence essentielle pour les spécialistes de l’histoire intellectuelle, de l’histoire de l’exégèse biblique et de la réception des Pères de l’Eglise pendant le long XVIe siècle. Seiziémiste de formation, elle s’est également aventurée dans d’autres chronologies, en s’intéressant à l’Église de la fin du moyen âge et à la philosophie de ce XVIIe siècle qui l’a de plus en plus passionnée et qui constitue aujourd’hui son centre d’intérêt majeur. Ce recueil célèbre son long et original enseignement et ses grandes qualités de chercheuses et de collègue.
No Access

Series:

Edited by William Poole

John Wilkins (1614-72): New Essays presents ten fresh essays on the life and work of the influential English natural philosopher and theologian, John Wilkins. Wilkins, one of the most prominent figures in the scientific revolution in England, and a founder of the Royal Society of London, published widely on astronomy, mechanics, language, and theology, and was also an important churchman and politician. These ten essays review Wilkins’s writings and influence, while also addressing the wider contexts of his activities, including his service as head of house at two successive colleges in Oxford and Cambridge, and his political work. This new collection thus covers all aspects of Wilkins’s career, and functions as a complete reappraisal of this seminal early modern figure.

Contributors are: C. S. L. Davies, Mordechai Feingold, Felicity Henderson, Natalie Kaoukji, Rhodri Lewis, Scott Mandelbrote, Jon Parkin, William Poole, Anna Marie Roos, and Richard Serjeantson.

No Access

Kant on Conscience

A Unified Approach to Moral Self-Consciousness

Series:

Emre Kazim

In Kant on Conscience Emre Kazim offers the first systematic treatment of Kant’s theory of conscience. Contrary to the scholarly consensus, Kazim argues that Kant’s various discussions of conscience - as practical reason, as a feeling, as a power, as a court, as judgement, as the voice of God, etc. - are philosophically coherent aspects of the same unified thing (‘Unity Thesis’). Through conceptual reconstruction and historical contextualisation of the primary texts, Kazim both presents Kant’s notion of conscience as it relates to his critical thought and philosophically evaluates the coherence of his various claims. In light of this, Kazim shows the central role that conscience plays in the understanding of Kantian ethics as a whole.
No Access

Series:

Pierre Bayle

Edited by Michael W. Hickson

Dialogues of Maximus and Themistius is the first English translation of Pierre Bayle’s last book, Entretiens de Maxime et de Thémiste, published posthumously in 1707. The two parts of the Dialogues offer Bayle’s final responses to Jean Le Clerc and Isaac Jaquelot, who had accused Bayle of supporting atheism through his writings on the problem of evil. The Dialogues defends Bayle’s thesis that the problem of evil cannot be solved by reason alone, but serves only to demonstrate the necessity of faith. In his Introduction to the Dialogues, Michael W. Hickson provides detailed historical and philosophical background to the problem of evil in early modern philosophy, as well as summary and analysis of Bayle’s debates with Le Clerc and Jaquelot.
No Access

Hermann Samuel Reimarus (1694-1768)

Classicist, Hebraist, Enlightenment Radical in Disguise

Series:

Ulrich Groetsch

Over the course of thirty years, Hermann Samuel Reimarus (1694-1768) secretly drafted what would become the most thorough attack on revelation to date, ushering the quest for the historical Jesus and foreshadowing the religious criticism of the new atheism of the twentieth century. Peeling away the layers of Reimarus’s radical work by looking at hitherto unpublished manuscript evidence, Ulrich Groetsch shows that the Radical Enlightenment was more than just an international philosophical movement. By demonstrating the importance philology, antiquarianism, and Semitic languages played in Reimarus’s upbringing, scholarship, and teaching, this new study provides a vivid portrayal of an Enlightenment radical at the cusp of the secular age, whose debt to earlier traditions of scholarship remains undisputed.
No Access

Johann Amos Comenius und die pädagogischen Hoffnungen der Gegenwart

Grundzüge einer mentalitätsgeschichtlichen Neuinterpretation seines Werkes

Series:

Andreas Lischewski

Insofern Erziehung auf die Zukunft gerichtet ist, bedarf sie der Hoffnung. Und wer nicht hofft, kann auch nicht erziehen. Doch die nicht selten euphorisch zu nennende Erwartung, dass man von einer wissenschaftlich begründeten Erziehung auch eine entscheidende Weltverbesserung erhoffen könne, dürfte wesentlich eine Erfindung der anhebenden Neuzeit gewesen sein.
Die übliche pädagogische Ideengeschichte sieht in Comenius zumeist einen vormodernen Gegenpol zum technisch-zivilisatorischen Denken der Neuzeit – und übersah damit notwendig wesentliche Kontinuitäten. Denn es war Comenius, der mit seiner pansophischen Systematik zuerst die Hoffnung verband, eine solcherart durchkonstruierte Erziehungsmaschine begründet zu haben, dass eine wahrhaft pansophisch ausgerichtete Erziehung auch einen unfehlbaren Erziehungserfolg verbürgen müsse.
Ein mentalitätsgeschichtlicher Zugang vermag dabei zu zeigen, wie sich die pädagogischen Hoffnungen des Comenius entwickelt und zeitgleich mit der pansophischen Systematik ausgeprägt haben. Je durchdachter die Systematik wurde, desto unfehlbarer sollte auch die Erziehung werden. Mit einer vollkommen realisierten pansophischen Erziehung würden sich also alle Hoffnungen auf eine Weltverbesserung erfüllen; alles, was bis dahin zukunftsgerichtete Hoffnung war, würde also mit der Pampaedia zur erfüllten Gegenwart werden. Von der menschlichen resignation der Frühschriften über die gott-menschliche cooperatio der pansophischen Programmschriften führt solcherart der Weg zur intendierten omnipotentia des Menschen, an welcher schließlich auch die Erziehung teilhaben soll.
Unter der Rücksicht der longue durée ist Comenius damit nicht nur ein, sondern letztlich der Begründer der pädagogischen Moderne. Seit Comenius produziert wissenschaftlich-systematisches Denken immer neue Erziehungshoffnungen, die sich sodann durch gesellschaftliche Erwartungshaltungen selbstlaufend re-produzieren und die Nachfrage nach pädagogischer Wissenschaftlichkeit wiederum steigern. Doch die Welt hat sich bis heute bekanntlich nicht verbessern lassen – trotz einer über 350 Jahre alten Tradition wissenschaftlich begründeter Pädagogik.
No Access

Theologie im Transzensus

Die Wissenschaftslehre als Grundlagentheorie einer transzendentalen Fundamentaltheologie in Johann Gottlieb Fichtes Principien der Gottes- Sitten- und Rechtslehre von 1805

Series:

Mathias Müller

Der Philosoph Johann Gottlieb Fichte (1762–1814) gilt mit seiner sogenannten ›Wissenschaftslehre‹ als einer der bedeutendsten Vertreter einer transzendentalen Theorie über – modern gesprochen – Wissenschaftstheorie. Könnten so seine Entdeckungen nicht auch für die Theologie systematische Bedeutung haben, insbesondere in der Frage, ob diese selber eine Wissenschaft sein kann?
Mathias Müller versucht anhand einer systematischen Konstruktionsanalyse von Fichtes Schrift »Die Principien der Gottes- Sitten- u. Rechtslehre. Februar und März 1805« zu zeigen, dass und wie in der Wissenschaftslehre diese selber eine Grundlegung bildet, die als eine Grundlagentheorie der Theologie eingesehen werden kann.
Mittels des Modells des ›Transzensus‹ wird versucht, einen für das transzendentale Ich gangbaren Weg nachzuzeichnen und anzubieten, um so – performativ erlebbar – die Wissenschaftlichkeit einer Theologie als transzendentale Fundamentaltheologie zu erschliessen.
No Access

Rousseau and l’Infâme

Religion, Toleration, and Fanaticism in the Age of Enlightenment

Series:

Edited by Ourida Mostefai

Ecrasez l’infâme! Voltaire’s rallying cry against fanaticism resonates with new force today. Nothing suggests the complex legacy of the Enlightenment more than the struggle of superstition, prejudice, and intolerance advocated by most of the Enlightenment philosophers, regardless of their ideological differences. The aim of this book is to undertake a reconsideration of the controversies surrounding the questions of religion, toleration, and fanaticism in the eighteenth century through an examination of Rousseau’s dialogue with Voltaire. What come to light from this confrontation are two leading and at times competing world views and conceptions of the place of the engaged writer in society.