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Addressing Zionists in 1923, the British artist C. R. Ashbee spoke of “that preposterous Balfour Declaration whose Arabic tail you people perpetually ignore, but the lash of which you will some day feel.” His warnings received no attention at the time, nor has his radical pro-Arab Palestinian political position been researched since. One hundred years later, this art historical study asks what possibilities individual colonial actors had to influence official colonial policy. In the example of Jerusalem under British rule, Moya Tönnies analyses how three members of the British administration, Ashbee, architect Ernest Tatham Richmond, and governor Ronald Storrs, all three identifying with the International Arts and Crafts Movement, used art as a diplomatic sphere for their British colonial anti-Zionist interventions.
This book's primary task is to test the contemporary value of performance and performativity. Performative Identities in Culture: From Literature to Social Media undertakes this task via a host of articles on a vast spectrum of performativity-related topics such as: literature (British, American, Welsh), film, art, social media, and sports. Within these contexts, the book raises a number of questions relevant today, starting from identity formation and crisis and ending with digital ethics and aesthetics at play.
Spaces for Performance, Patronage and Urban Musical Experience
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Listening to Confraternities offers new perspectives on the contribution of guild and devotional confraternities to the urban phonosphere based on original research and an interdisciplinary approach. Historians of art, architecture, culture, sound, music and the senses consider the ways in which, through their devotional practices, confraternities acted as patrons of music, created their identity through sound and were involved in the everyday musical experience of major cities in early modern Europe. Confraternities have been studied from many different angles, but only rarely as acoustic communities that communicated through sound and whose musical activities delimited the urban spaces in which they were active and were listened to by the inhabitants of the cities in which they often formed interclass social groups.

Contributors include: Nicholas Terpstra, Emanuela Vai, Ana López Suero, Henry Drummond, Ascensión Mazuela-Anguita, Ferrán Escrivà-Llorca, Noel O’Regan, Magnus Williamson, Xavier Torres Sans, Erika Honisch, Alexander Fisher, Konrad Eisenbichler, Daniele Filippi, Dylan Reid, Elisa Lessa, Antonio Ruiz Caballero, Juan Ruiz Jiménez, Sergi González González, and Tess Knighton
This volume presents a broad spectrum of essays that exemplify rich advances in current print scholarship. It aims to reinstate print, often overlooked or marginalised. While the essays reflect the varied production and role of print, central themes explored here include the making of prints and their perceived ‘place’ within a printmaker’s practice or the circulation, reception and use of prints in the hands of diverse publishers and audiences. The varied production, uses and reception of prints addressed in this volume highlights the importance of the medium in Art History.