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Bundist Legacy after the Second World War

“Real” Place versus “Displaced” Time. Free Ebrei Volume 1

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Edited by Vincenzo Pinto

Bundist Legacy after the Second World War offers an account on post-war Bund, the most important Jewish political party in East Europe before the outbreak of the Second World War. This subject area has attracted more attention in the last few years, when a new generation of scholars is trying to assess the “transformation” of memory and the political, cultural and pedagogical role played by the last members of Bund. This volume aims to create a new “Bund” (union) after the end of historical Bund, and help to answer the question, “What is to be done after the birth of Israel?” The volume is one of the first attempts to answer this crucial existential and political question.
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The Jew in Czech and Slovak Imagination, 1938-89

Antisemitism, the Holocaust, and Zionism

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Hana Kubátová and Jan Láníček

The Jew in Czech and Slovak Imagination,1938-89 is the first critical inquiry into the nature of anti-Jewish prejudices in both main parts of former Czechoslovakia. The authors identify anti-Jewish prejudices over almost fifty years of the twentieth century, focusing primarily on the post-Munich period and the Second World War (1938–45), the post-war reconstruction (1945–48), as well as the Communist rule with both its thaws and returns to hardline rule (1948–89). It is a provocative examination of the construction of the image of ‘the Jew’ in the Czech and Slovak majority societies, the assigning of character and other traits – real or imaginary – to individuals or groups. The book analyses the impact of these constructed images on the attitudes of the majority societies towards the Jews, and on Holocaust memory in the country.
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The New Babylonian Diaspora

The Rise and Fall of the Jewish Community in Iraq, 16th-20th Centuries C.E.

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Zvi Yehuda

The New Babylonian Diaspora: Rise and Fall of Jewish Community in Iraq, 16th–20th Centuries C.E. provides a historical survey of the Iraqi Jewish community's evolution from the apex of its golden age to its disappearance, emergence, rapid growth and annihilation. Making use of Judeo-Arabic newspapers and archives in London, Paris, Washington D.C. and other sources, Zvi Yehuda proves that from 1740 to 1914, Iraq became a lodestone for tens of thousands of Jewish immigrants from Kurdistan, Persia, the Mediterranean Basin, and Eastern and Central Europe. After these Jews had settled in Baghdad and Mesopotamia, they became “Babylonians” and ‘forgot’ their lands of origin, contrary to the social habit of Jews in other communities throughout history.
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Edited by Yosef Kaplan and Dan Michman

In The Religious Cultures of Dutch Jewry an international group of scholars examines aspects of religious belief and practice of pre-emancipation Sephardim and Ashkenazim in Amsterdam, Curaçao and Surinam, ceremonial dimensions, artistic representations of religious life, and religious life after the Shoa. The origins of Dutch Jewry trace back to diverse locations and ancestries: Marranos from Spain and Portugal and Ashkenazi refugees from Germany, Poland and Lithuania. In the new setting and with the passing of time and developments in Dutch society at large, the religious life of Dutch Jews took on new forms. Dutch Jewish society was thus a microcosm of essential changes in Jewish history.
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Israel Celebrates

Jewish Holidays and Civic Culture in Israel

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Hizky Shoham

Israel Celebrates is about the intersection where Israeli inventiveness and Jewish tradition meet: the holidays. It employs the anthropological history of four Jewish holidays as celebrated in Israel in order to track the naturalization of Jewish rituals, myths, and symbols in Israeli culture throughout “the long twentieth century” of Zionism and on to the present, and to demonstrate how a new strand of Judaism developed in Israel from the grassroots. But could this grassroots Israeli culture develop into a shared symbolic space for both Jews and Arabs? By probing the political implications of the minutiae of life, the book argues that this popular culture might come to define Jewish identity in Israel of the 21st century.
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Edited by Raanan Rein, Stefan Rinke and Nadia Zysman

The New Ethnic Studies in Latin America aims at going beyond and against much of Jewish Latin American historiography, situating Jewish-Latin Americans in the larger multi-ethnic context of their countries. Senior and junior scholars from various countries joined together to challenge commonly held assumptions, accepted ideas, and stable categories about ethnicity in Latin America in general and Jewish experiences on this continent in particular.

This volume brings to the discussions on Jewish life in Latin America less heard voices of women, non-affiliated Jews, and intellectuals. Community institutions are not at center stage, conflicts and tensions are brought to the fore, and a multitude of voices pushes aside images of homogeneity. Authors in this tome look at Jews’ multiple homelands: their country of birth, their country of residence, and their imagined homeland of Zion.
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Who Needs Arab-Jewish Identity?

Interpellation, Exclusion, and Inessential Solidarities

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Reuven Snir

In Who Needs Arab-Jewish Identity?: Interpellation, Exclusion, and Inessential Solidarities, Professor Reuven Snir, Dean of Humanities at Haifa University, presents a new approach to the study of Arab-Jewish identity and the subjectivities of Arabized Jews. Against the historical background of Arab-Jewish culture and in light of identity theory, Snir shows how the exclusion that the Arabized Jews had experienced, both in their mother countries and then in Israel, led to the fragmentation of their original identities and encouraged them to find refuge in inessential solidarities. Following double exclusion, intense globalization, and contemporary fluidity of identities, singularity, not identity, has become the major war cry among Arabized Jews during the last decade in our present liquid society.
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Edited by Brian Smollett and Christian Wiese

Reappraisals and New Studies of the Modern Jewish Experience brings together twenty scholars of Modern Jewish history and thought. The essays provide a fresh perspective on several central questions in Jewish intellectual, social, and religious history from the eighteenth century to the present in the contexts of Russia, Western and Central Europe, and the Americas.
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Jewish Youth around the World, 1990-2010 (paperback)

Social Identity and Values in a Comparative Approach

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Erik H. Cohen Z"l

In Jewish Youth around the World 1990-2010: Social Identity and Values, Erik Cohen offers a rich and multi-faceted picture of Jewish adolescents and young adults today. Based on numerous empirical studies conducted by the author over the course of two decades among various populations in Israel and every major Diaspora country, it considers a range of issues, including: demographics and migration patterns, Jewish identity, involvement in the Jewish community, leisure time activities, values, relationship to Israel and to the global Jewish collective. In-depth analysis of the data uncovers similarities and differences of various sub-populations by nationality, level of religiosity, age, gender and more. The book is pioneering in its comparative approach to Jewish youth around the world.

This book is also available in hardcover.

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Edited by Françoise S. Ouzan and Manfred Gerstenfeld

This volume offers insights into the major Jewish migration movements and rebuilding of European Jewish communities in the mid-twentieth century. Its chapters illustrate many facets of the Jews’ often traumatic post-war experiences. People had to find their way when returning to their countries of origin or starting from scratch in a new land. Their experiences and hardships from country to country and from one community of migrants to another are analyzed here. The mass exodus of Jews from Arab and Muslim countries is also addressed to provide a necessary and broader insight into how those challenges were met, as both migrations were a result of persecution, as well as discrimination.

This book is also available in hardcover.