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Were mid-Tudor evangelicals roaring lions or meek lambs? Did they struggle with a minority complex, or were they comfortable with their position of political ascendancy under Edward VI? How did their theological blueprint of the ‘True Church’ fit their temporal realities? By relocating the Book of Common Prayer at the centre of the English Reformation, this book gives new significance to two underacknowledged drivers of reform: ecclesiology and liturgy. Edwardian reformers caused a sensation in England by engaging with these questions, which spilled over into Ireland, and continued to cast a shadow over subsequent generations of the English Protestants.
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When Francis of Assisi started to use his family’s resources for religious purposes, his father took him to court. It was there that Francis dispossessed himself of everything and began a new life that soon inspired others to follow.
Within a century, members of this Order of Friars Minor were among the first to dedicate complete treatises to discussions of buying, selling, and the whole of human exchange that is known as economics. The natural question to ask—and the one proposed here—is whether there might be a connection between the two, between Franciscan poverty and Franciscan economic thought?
With the Life and Times of Its Author, George Con
In Mary Queen of Scots: The First Biography, Ronald Santangeli has recovered a long-forgotten document of great historiographical, literary and cultural importance. Written in 1624 in Neo-Latin by George Con, a young expatriate Scot in Rome, it is worthy of study, both for its content and its literary dimension. The fully recensed Latin text, is presented with a meticulous translation into English and a fully-annotated commentary. The image Con creates of the Scottish Queen has prevailed in European cultural representations from poetry and drama to novels, paintings and opera, while Con's own meteoric career highlights the impact on 17th century Catholic Europe by members of the Scottish diaspora. A significant addition to Marian and Scottish Neo-Latin studies.
The sixteenth century saw the world as being mortally threatened by Satan who was encouraged by the widespread popularity of magic and other occult practices. Church and society struck back to defend people from this tidal wave of wickedness. Del Río’s panoramic and detailed treatise provided a powerful weapon in that battle. Far from dry scholarship, however, ‘Investigations’ is an engaging, fascinating, earnest conversation between Del Río and his readers and a major contribution to understanding key aspects of everyday sixteenth century behaviour and the problem of evil.
Der Band bietet 94 Briefe aus der Korrespondenz Bucers von Januar bis Juli 1534. Hier setzt sich die internationale Perspektive fort, die seit Mitte 1533 zu beobachten ist. Die evangelischen Korrespondenten betrachten die europapolitische Bündnispolitik skeptisch: Bucer rechnet im Januar 1534 damit, dass Papst Clemens VI. den englischen König Heinrich VIII. an sich binden wird, während die evangelischen Fürsten im Reich noch versuchen, mit Heinrich ein Bündnis zu schließen. Anfang Februar schätzt Bucer den französischen König milder ein, mit Sorge sieht er jedoch die Bemühungen Philipps von Hessen um Franz I.
Im Blick auf die Schweiz versucht Bucer in Schaffhausen auch 1534 im Abendmahlsstreit der Ortsprediger zu vermitteln. Die Korrespondenz mit den Züricher Kollegen kreist um die innerevangelische Auseinandersetzung um die Sakramentstheologie und in diesem Zusammenhang die Person Luthers. Seit dem achttägigen Besuch Bucers bei den Blarers in Konstanz im April 1533 gewinnt der Plan Gestalt, eine Ausbildungsstätte für den theologischen Nachwuchs in Straßburg zu errichten. Hinsichtlich der Einführung der Reformation in Württemberg skizziert Bucer in einem Schreiben an Philipp von Hessen und Ulrich von Württemberg sein Konzept, in dessen Zentrum die friedliche Koexistenz der evangelischen Positionen steht. Seltene Einblicke gewährt die Korrespondenz in Bucers Familienleben.
The sixteenth century saw the world as being mortally threatened by Satan who was encouraged by the widespread popularity of magic and other occult practices. Church and society struck back to defend people from this tidal wave of wickedness. Del Río’s panoramic and detailed treatise provided a powerful weapon in that battle. Far from dry scholarship, however, ‘Investigations’ is an engaging, fascinating, earnest conversation between Del Río and his readers and a major contribution to understanding key aspects of everyday sixteenth century behaviour and the problem of evil.
Interreligious Dialogue, Agreements, and Toleration in 16th–18th Century Eastern Europe
The Introduction and the chapter Toleration and Religious Polemics are available in Open Access.

Searching for Compromise? is a collection of articles researching the issues of toleration, interreligious peace and models of living together in a religiously diverse Central and Eastern Europe during the Early Modern period.

By studying theologians, legal cases, literature, individuals, and congregations this volume brings forth unique local dynamics in Central and Eastern Europe. Scholars and researchers will find these issues explored from the perspectives of diverse groups of Christians such as Catholics, Hussies, Bohemian Brethren, Old Believers, Eastern Orthodox, Lutherans, Calvinists, Moravians and Unitarians. The volume is a much-needed addition to the scholarly books written on these issues from the Western European perspective.

Contributors are Kazimierz Bem, Wolfgang Breul, Jan Červenka, Sławomir Kościelak, Melchior Jakubowski, Bryan D. Kozik, Uladzimir Padalinski, Maciej Ptaszyński, Luise Schorn-Schütte, Alexander Schunka, Paul Shore, Stephan Steiner, Bogumił Szady, and Christopher Voigt-Goy.
The sixteenth century saw the world as being mortally threatened by Satan who was encouraged by the widespread popularity of magic and other occult practices. Church and society struck back to defend people from this tidal wave of wickedness. Del Río’s panoramic and detailed treatise provided a powerful weapon in that battle. Far from dry scholarship, however, ‘Investigations’ is an engaging, fascinating, earnest conversation between Del Río and his readers and a major contribution to understanding key aspects of everyday sixteenth century behaviour and the problem of evil.
The sixteenth century saw the world as being mortally threatened by Satan who was encouraged by the widespread popularity of magic and other occult practices. Church and society struck back to defend people from this tidal wave of wickedness. Del Río’s panoramic and detailed treatise provided a powerful weapon in that battle. Far from dry scholarship, however, ‘Investigations’ is an engaging, fascinating, earnest conversation between Del Río and his readers and a major contribution to understanding key aspects of everyday sixteenth century behaviour and the problem of evil.