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Obstinate Star is a history of Puerto Rico’s independence struggle against Spanish and U.S. colonialism. From the time of the Napoleonic Wars, it traces the movement’s currents, within and beyond the island, linking them to ongoing social conflicts and international trends and conjunctures. Beginning with the radical democratic fight against Spanish control, it moves on to the early reactions to U.S. rule, the role of Nationalism, Communism and New Deal currents during the Great Depression and the Second World War, the rise of new forces in the wake of the Cuban revolution and recent struggles in the epoch of capitalist globalisation.
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One of the great challenges of our time is related to the circulation of technology. We argue that while circulation leads to global technicisation, it also allows for the emergence of a zone of decolonial translation. Since this zone will always be contested, it needs to be constantly recreated and maintained. The main aim of this volume, with its six case studies, is to stimulate debate and many more curious praxiographic studies on this endeavour.

Contributors are Sarah Biecker, Marc Boeckler, Jude Kagoro, Jochen Monstadt, Sung-Joon Park, Eva Riedke, Richard Rottenburg, Klaus Schlichte, Jannik Schritt, Alena Thiel, Christiane Tristl, Jonas van der Straeten.
The analysis of geopolitics and energy security policies in the Caspian region is a challenging research task. This is because of the specific development of international relations in this region and the evolution of its importance in the context of the functioning of the global energy market. Due to its special geopolitical location in central Eurasia and at the junction at the world’s largest trading routes, the region is gaining in importance, both politically and economically in contemporary international relations, and becoming a place where actors involved satisfy the need for energy security.
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Since the advent of the reign of Mohammed VI in 1999, Morocco has deployed a new continental foreign policy. The Kingdom aspires to be recognized as an emerging African power in its identity as well as in its space of projection. In order to meet these ambitions, the diplomatic apparatus is developing and modernizing, while a singular role identity is emerging around the notion of the "golden mean". This study presents, on an empirical level, the conditions of the elaboration and conduct of this Africa policy, and analyzes, on a theoretical level, the evolution of the Moroccan role identity in the international system.
Geopolitical Logics of Chinese, American, and Russian Assistance
What motivates states to assist other countries in need? Focusing on Chinese, Russian, and American decisions about COVID-19 aid, this book illuminates the role of historically contingent ideas in donors’ decisions. Drawing on the theoretical insights of the critical geopolitics tradition, it advances and tests explanations for aid-related decisions on a novel global dataset of COVID-19 aid. Rigorously theorized, meticulously researched, and accessibly written, this book illuminates the ways in which China and Russia seek to reshape the humanitarian field consistent with their geopolitical visions. Their competition with the US over approaches to aid has weakened the integrity of humanitarian system.
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Where is Marxism in International Relations? The answer lies in this collective work by Brazilian authors who have looked to Marxist theory for an alternative perspective, and therefore outside the dominant ideas in the field, to analyse International Relations. Specifically, the answer is divided into themes: key ideas by Marx and Engels for IR, Marxist thinkers as IR theorists, Marxist theories on imperialism, and the Latin-American theory on dependency. With the end result, this book adds to the international intellectual efforts to criticize and overcome capitalism.
Alternatives and Sustainable Futures
The frontiers of extraction are expanding rapidly, driven by a growing demand for minerals and metals that is often motivated by sustainability considerations. Two volumes of International Development Policy are dedicated to the paradoxes and futures of green extractivism, with analyses of experiences from five continents. In this, the second of the two volumes, the 22 authors, using different conceptual approaches and in different empirical contexts, demonstrate the alarming obduracy of the logic of extractivism, even - and perhaps especially - in the growing support for the so-called green transition. The authors highlight the complex and enduring legacies of resource extraction and the urgent need to move beyond extractive models of development towards alternative pathways that prioritise social justice, environmental sustainability, democratic governance and the well-being of both humans and non-humans. They also caution us against the assumption that anti-extraction is anti-extractivist, that post-extraction is post-extractivism, and they critically attune us to the systemic nature of extractivism in ways that both connect and transcend any particular site or scale.

This volume accompanies IDP 15, The Lives of Extraction: Identities, Communities, and the Politics of Place.
Uncover the fascinating story of Greece's unwavering quest for European belonging. This thought-provoking book explores the intersection of geopolitics and political myth, tracing Greece's enduring determination to align with Europe and the West. From the early days of European integration to the challenges of the Eurocrisis, Greece's commitment remains steadfast. By analyzing the geopolitical myths that shape its identity, the book illuminates the multifaceted factors driving Greece's pro-European strategy and foreign policy. By introducing and using Analytical Geopolitics as a pioneering approach, the book provides a historical-structural framework and expands the role of myth in understanding international relations.