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Geopolitics and International Relations is a new and unique platform where a debate is possible between and within different schools of thought in geopolitics and international relations. It is conceived deliberately as a zone in which geopolitics and international relations can connect with each other rather than closing themselves off into existing publications in their respective fields. It also points to the increasing relevance of territorially embedded factors in the analysis of today’s international relations. In addition, the series is open to contributions from scholars working in other fields, such as historians, geographers, economists, political scientists, psychologists, specialists in international law, etc.

Today, more and more analysts are using the concept "geopolitics", but they do not always clearly define it (sometimes using it merely as a synonym for "power politics"). Geopolitics and International Relations presents a clear opportunity to connect, and it offers opportunities to academics, students, and practitioners to learn from each other, as well as more comprehensive analyses on the geopolitical challenges that affect many dimensions of the politics of today and tomorrow (security, economy, energy, environment, technology, and diplomacy & foreign policy).

Manuscripts should meet a minimum length requirement of 80,000 words.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts by email to the publisher Jason Prevost. Please direct all other correspondence to Associate Editor Athina Dimitriou.

Authors will find general proposal guidelines at the Brill Author Gateway.
If you want to better understand not only international but also social diplomacy, then this book is for you. If you are a practitioner in traditional diplomacy or a person who want to apply diplomatic ideas and methods in social life, you can find many useful insights in this original work. A scholar and experienced diplomat, the author argues that international and social diplomacy can learn from each other. He explores genuine diplomacy as a goodwill mission, constructive engagement, and dialogical interaction that can help states, non-state organizations, companies, groups, individuals, and their aggregations to create public goods and make positive social changes.
Editor:
The Impact of Innovation on Globalization is the eighth volume of the series China in the World. Like other volumes in the series, this volume includes views of leading Chinese scholars on China’s relations with other countries and regions in the world. In view of the theme of “globalization” in this volume, the contributors in this volume pay attention to how the Covid-19 pandemic impacts and challenges globalization, especially how it affects China, the United States, and their mutual relations.
However, this is not to say that some issues surrounding globalization—the orientation and interrelationship of political and economic decision-making in China and the United States—have emerged only after the outbreak of the pandemic. The volume focuses on some long-term trends and innovations, from the past to the future. Chapter 2, “Globalization, Convergence, and China’s Economic Development,” describes the patterns of globalization. Chapter 3, “The Rejuvenation of the Chinese Nation is Unstoppable,” talks about views on current economic and financial issues. Chapter 4, “Reconstructing Global Industrial Chains under the Pandemic, and China’s Response,” discusses China’s pivotal position in global supply chains. Besides answering these basic questions, the book investigates other important issues, such as Global Value Chains, Changes in the International Order, Changes in the International Economic Landscape, WTO Reform, China’s Foreign Economic and Trade Strategies, Towards a Climate Resilience Society, Identity Politics, and the AI “Revolution”.
Author:
Author:
One of the most dominant security issues of the twenty-first century has been the US led battle against transnational terrorism – the aptly named Long War. Over the past fifteen years the Long War has been examined using multiple perspectives. However, one central mechanism is missing in current Long War analyses: defence diplomacy. Defence diplomacy enhances the diplomatic and security capacity of a state, providing the only link between executive office and the ministries of foreign affairs and defence, two vital institutions in the Long War. Using a case study of US defence diplomacy in Afghanistan from 2001 to 2014, the paper argues simply that the practice of defence diplomacy far outweighs current theories on what it is, how it works and why it matters. The paper aims to generate a more nuanced understanding of defence diplomacy, as well as identify it as a key component of the US CT/COIN strategy to achieve their Long War policy objectives.
FORTHCOMING in 2023

In 2023, individuals will become eligible for a limited promotional period of free access to Contemporary Arab Affairs. Please be sure to revisit this page to take advantage of this offer.

The journal was established in 2008, was published by University of California Press through 2022, and is published by Brill starting in 2023.

Contemporary Arab Affairs is the international quarterly journal of the Centre for Arab Unity Studies (CAUS) in Beirut, Lebanon. It is a multidisciplinary peer-reviewed journal that publishes high-quality and original research from and on the Arab region. Contemporary Arab Affairs publishes work by specialists, policy experts, and scholars from the Arab world or those who have academic interest in the region. Drawing on the expertise of CAUS, a well-established publisher of research in Arabic, Contemporary Arab Affairs publishes both original English-language research and studies and works originally produced in Arabic by Arab researchers and intellectuals for a global international audience with the aim of promoting constructive dialogue on Arab political, socio-economic, and cultural affairs.

The journal welcomes the following types of submissions:
- Research articles (7,000-10,000 words; majority of submissions)
- Commentaries (maximum 3,000 words; exceptions can be made)
- Interviews (maximum 2,000 words)
- Book reviews (maximum 3,000 words)
- Proceedings of select conferences organized by CAUS (maximum 7,000 words)
- Synopses of recent Arab-language publications (maximum 3,500 words)

For editorial and book review queries and proposals, please contact the CAA/CAUS Editorial Office.

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A Journal of Diplomacy and Society
Editors-in-Chief: and
Open the "Media" section below under the "About" tab for multimedia related to Diplomatica.

Diplomatica: A Journal of Diplomacy and Society addresses the broad range of work being done across the social sciences and the humanities that takes diplomacy as its focus of investigation. The journal explores and investigates diplomacy as an extension of social interests, forces, and environments. It is multidisciplinary, providing a space to unite perspectives from diplomatic history (humanities) and diplomatic studies (social sciences) in particular. It is interdisciplinary, expanding beyond its disciplinary foundation of history to enrich historical perspectives with innovative analyses from other disciplines. It seeks to broaden the study of diplomacy temporally, contributing to a re-appraisal of diplomacy across the modern and early modern eras and beyond, in this way bridging temporal divides and introducing debate between scholars of different periodizations. It is determinedly global in orientation, providing a space for inter-regional comparisons. The journal is published in cooperation with the New Diplomatic History (NDH) Network.

Diplomatica seeks to merge diplomatic history and diplomatic studies through three main approaches:
1. Habitat: Exploring the multiple identities, behaviors, rituals, and belief systems of diplomats and how they change according to time, place, and space;
2. Actors: Challenging the centrality of the nation-state as the principal actor framing an understanding of what diplomacy is by focusing equally on the role of non-state actors;
3. Disciplines: Introducing appropriate methodologies from the social sciences, such as prosopography, network analysis, gender studies, economics, geography, and communications, in order to broaden the analytical study of diplomatic habitats, actors, and interactions through time.

Broadly speaking, Diplomatica covers the study of diplomatic process more than the study of diplomatic product. It questions, investigates, and explores all aspects of the diplomatic world, from interactions between the professionally diplomatic and the non-diplomatic to the arrangement of summits and banquets, the architecture of ministries and residences, and the identities, roles, practices, and networks of envoys, policy entrepreneurs, salonnières, and all other private and quasi-private individuals who affect the course of diplomacy.

The journal welcomes submissions dealing with any period and locale from across the humanities and social sciences. Submissions should be standard article length (approximately 8,000 words including footnotes) and written for a general, scholarly audience.

For editorial queries and proposals, please contact the Diplomatica Editorial Office.

For book review queries, please contact the book review editor, Haakon Ikonomou.

The Mattingly Award
Brill, the editorial board of Diplomatica, and the New Diplomatic History Network are pleased to provide an annual award of €500 for excellence and originality in an essay on diplomatic society or culture, broadly defined. The Mattingly Award is named for the American historian, Garrett Mattingly (1900-62), an esteemed writer, scholar, and professor at Columbia University. Best known for his history of the Spanish Armada (1959), which won the Pulitzer Prize, and his biography of Catherine of Aragon (1941), Mattingly pioneered the study of diplomatic institutions, practices, norms, and personalities, notably in his classic history of early modern Europe, Renaissance Diplomacy (1955).

2021 Winner: Philip G. Post, Leiden University


2020 Winners: Birgit Tremml-Werner, Linnaeus University and Lisa Hellman, University of Bonn.

2019 Winner: Sam de Schutter, Institute for History, Leiden University.
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Individuals are eligible for free access to the International Journal of Parliamentary Studies until 31 December 2022, using access token PARL4U. Click here for more information.

The International Journal of Parliamentary Studies is a peer-reviewed international journal that provides a forum for academic research connected to legislative, procedural, political, comparative, and other matters related to parliaments at all governmental levels from all countries, including supranational (EU) matters. The journal analyses legislatures’ actors and activities, including their internal and external relations, from a theoretical, procedural, or practical point of view. The editors cultivate a strongly international author base and encourage contributions from the various fields of the legal and social sciences, thus seeking to offer a remedy to the specialization within and estrangement between these disciplines as well as to the distance between legislative theory and parliamentary practice.

Until recently, legislative issues, parliamentary procedure, and practice were exclusively the purview of national legislation and jurisdiction and were, therefore, issues for primarily domestic scholarship. However, a kind of parliamentary “ius gentium” or “ius commune” is evolving: Parliamentary activities are increasingly observed by international actors and repeatedly reviewed by international forums. Parliamentary issues are no longer matters of one institution or nation. There are points of contact between institutions and nations, and learning from one another is possible (e.g., regarding constitution and state building). Supranational parliaments (including the European Parliament) are gradually becoming important actors in world politics and policies.

The International Journal of Parliamentary Studies invites scholars of all levels of seniority and types of experience, from PhD students to professors and practitioners in parliamentary administrations, to submit papers on parliamentary issues, such as parliamentary functions, procedures, practice, the universal concepts of parliament (e.g., ministerial accountability, scrutiny, public engagement, separation of powers), democratic representation and elections, legislation, and constitutions. The journal welcomes the following types of submissions:

- Full-length article (5,000-10,000 words)
- Report: short presentations of data (e.g., on parliamentary sessions or elections) accompanied by analysis/evaluation (3,500-6,500 words)
- Case study: contributions from parliamentary organizations, presentations of court cases, internal parliamentary decisions related to parliamentary law (maximum of 5,000 words)
- Book review & conference review (maximum of 2,000 words)
- Forum article: academic reflections and debate on previous articles or reports (maximum of 5,000 words)

For editorial queries and proposals, please contact the International Journal of Parliamentary Studies Editorial Office.

For book review queries, please contact the book review editor, Attila Horváth.

The International Journal of Parliamentary Studies is published in cooperation with the National University of Public Service, Budapest.
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Editors-in-Chief: , , and
Political Anthropological Research on International Social Sciences (PARISS) encourages transversal social inquiries. The journal seeks to transcend disciplinary, linguistic and cultural fragmentations characteristic of scholarship in the 20th century. It aspires to reinvigorate scholarly engagements untroubled by canonic approaches and to provide a space for outstanding scholarship, marginalized elsewhere due to academic conventions. PARISS seeks to promote a plurality of ways of thinking, researching and writing and to give access to contemporary authors in the social sciences coming from non-English-speaking countries. The editors encourage contributions that write across disciplines, academic cultures and writing styles. Innovative and collective research is particularly welcome.

PARISS is published in cooperation with the Centre d’étude sur les Conflits — Liberté et Sécurité (CCLS).

The editors welcome individually authored or co-authored articles (up to 3 authors; approximately 7,000-11,000 words including footnotes) and collectively authored articles (3+ authors; 10,000-25,000 words including footnotes), as well as book reviews, interviews, commentaries, and shorter articles focused on research methodologies (all up to 5,000 words).

For editorial queries and proposals, please contact the PARISS Editorial Office.
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Digital Archives of the Roosevelt Institute for American Studies
The Roosevelt Institute for American Studies (RIAS) is an archive, public library, research center, and graduate school based in Middelburg, the Netherlands. Established in 1986 as the Roosevelt Study Center and completely renovated in 2017, the RIAS’s mission is to foster the study of American history in Europe, to facilitate research on the history of American politics, culture, and society, and to explore the historical development and trajectories of Dutch-American and, generally, transatlantic relations. The RIAS carries out such a mission under its motto “Pursuing the Rooseveltian Century,” which means that it supports academic research investigating the evolution of American society and its institutional settings, the changing nature of the relationship between the US government and its citizenry, the consolidation of modern political leadership, the evolution of American diplomacy and empire, and the performative roles played domestically and internationally by such ideas as freedom, security, and equality.

The RIAS holds hundreds of thousands of documents that help scholars and students at any level to investigate the complexity of American history. The RIAS collections focus on a variety of issues, such as civil rights, national security, intelligence, propaganda, radicalism, religion, and diplomacy. Collected over more than thirty years, these documents include presidential papers, personal correspondence and oral histories, departmental files, NGO records, diaries, memoires, historical periodicals, and journals.

In order to make its materials available to a larger audience, the RIAS, in cooperation with Brill, has recently started digitizing some of its most prominent holdings. Organized into the expanding online archival family Transatlantic Relations Online: Digital Archives of the Roosevelt Institute for American Studies and comprising, in this initial iteration, more than 200,000 scans, the digital archive currently consists of four different collections:

- Dutch-American Diplomatic Relations Online, 1784-1973
- The Fulbright Archives Online, 1949-2016 (excerpts): Papers of the Dutch-American Fulbright Program
- Dutch-Catholic Immigration to the Americas Online: The Henk van Stekelenburg Collection, 1820-1960
- Dutch-Protestant Immigration to the Americas Online: The Stallinga-Ganzevoort Collection, 1890-1960

Together, these collections provide unique insights into the history of Dutch-American relations, the development of transatlantic cultural programs, and the history of Dutch and European migration to North America. They are of particular interest to scholars working on cultural and public diplomacy, political and economic relations, migration flows, cross-cultural exchanges, the role of religion in foreign policy making, and the attractiveness of and resistance to American political, cultural, and economic hegemony in Europe.