Critical Mathematics Education

Can Democratic Mathematics Education Survive under Neoliberal Regime?

Bülent Avci

Drawing on rich ethnographic data, Critical Mathematics Education: Can Democratic Mathematics Education Survive under Neoliberal Regime? responds to ongoing discussions on the standardization in curriculum and reconceptualizes Critical Mathematics Education (CME) by arguing that despite obstructive implications of market-driven changes in education, a practice of critical mathematics education to promote critical citizenship could be implemented through open-ended projects that resonate with an inquiry-based collaborative learning and dialogic pedagogy. In doing so, neoliberal hegemony in education can be countered. The book also identifies certain limitations of critical mathematical education and suggests pedagogic and curricular strategies for critical educators to cope with these obstacles.

The Narrative of Mathematics Teachers

Elementary School Mathematics Teachers’ Features of Education, Knowledge, Teaching and Personality

Edited by Dorit Patkin and Avikam Gazit

The issue of mathematics teaching and its impact on learners' attainments in this subject has continuously been on the public agenda. The anthology of chapters in this book consists of varied up-to-date studies of some of the best mathematics education researchers and mathematics teaching experts, exploring the varied aspects of this essential. The book depicts the elementary school mathematics teachers' world while relating to three aspects which comprise the professional environment of mathematics teachers: Teachers' education and teachers' knowledge, Teaching and Teachers' personality. The chapters are written on a level which addresses and might interest a wide readership: researchers, in-service teachers, pre-service teachers, parents and learners.

Edited by Helle Alrø, Ole Ravn and Paulo Valero

Critical mathematics education brings together a series of concerns related to mathematics and its role in society, the practices of teaching and learning of mathematics in educational settings, and the practices of researching mathematics education. The work of Ole Skovsmose has provided a seminal contribution to the shaping of those concerns in the international community of mathematics educators and mathematics education researchers. This book gathers contributions of researchers from five continents, for whom critical mathematics education has been an inspiration to think about many different topics such as the dialogical and political dimensions of teacher education, mathematical modeling, the philosophy of mathematics from social and political perspectives, teaching practices in classrooms, the connection between mathematics and society, the scope and limits of critical thinking in relation to mathematics and mathematics education, and the political dimension of researching mathematics education.
The book is not only a tribute to Ole Skovsmose’s long academic career; it is also a way of providing an overview of the roots of the critical mathematics education concerns, their current developments in different parts of the world, and their future directions. With a diversity of styles and forms of texts, this book is addressed to all those teachers and researchers who would like to be introduced or would like to go deeper into the types of insights that critical mathematics education offers.

Series:

Edited by Yoshinori Shimizu, Berinderjeet Kaur, Rongjin Huang and David Clarke

Mathematical tasks have long been recognized as crucial mediators ?between mathematical content and the mathematics learner. For many people, the mathematics classroom is defined by the type of tasks one finds there - and this is appropriate. Mathematical tasks are the embodiment of the curricular pretext that brings each particular set of individuals together in every mathematics classroom. In other contexts, individuals come together to engage in musical performances or dramatic performances. The performances of the mathematics classroom are largely the performance of mathematical tasks and if we are to understand and facilitate the learning that is the purpose of such settings then we must understand the nature of the performances that we find there.
The classroom performance of a task is ultimately a unique synthesis of task, teacher, students and situation. Of particular interest are differences in the function of mathematically similar tasks when employed by different teachers, in different classrooms, for different instructional purposes, with different students. By making comparison possible between the classroom use of mathematical tasks in different classrooms around the world, the analyses reported in this book reveal the profound differences in how each teacher utilises mathematical tasks, in partnership with their students, to create a distinctive form of mathematical activity.
The Learner’s Perspective Study aims to juxtapose the observable practices of the classroom and the meanings attributed to those practices by classroom participants. The LPS research design documents sequences of at least ten lessons, using three video cameras, supplemented by the reconstructive accounts of classroom participants obtained in post-lesson video-stimulated interviews, and by test and questionnaire data, and copies of student written material. In each participating country, data generation focuses on the classrooms of three teachers, identified by the local mathematics education community as competent, and situated in demographically different school communities within the one major city. The large body of complex data supports both the characterisation of practice in the classrooms of competent teachers and the development of theory.

Marcelo C. Borba, Ana Paula dos Santos Malheiros and Rúbia Barcelos Amaral Zulatto

This book will address the discussion on online distance education, teacher education, and how the mathematics is transformed with the Internet, based on examples that illustrate the possibilities of different course models and on the theoretical construct humans-with-media. We will attempt to give the reader the sensation of experiencing one of the various distance courses in which we have participated, or a virtual community that does not have the structure of a course. And if the reader has not yet participated in any of these possibilities, we believe that the book may help, but not substitute, the experience of participating in a discussion list, a course, or a virtual community constituted by a specific interest.
This book is part of a collection of books called Trends in Mathematics Education, originally published in Brazil. This collection began being published in 2001 and currently has 21 titles published by more than 30 different authors. It is designed to present research to a broader audience that extends beyond academia. The books have been widely used in graduate courses, research groups and in some undergraduate classes. About 60, 000 copies of the Portuguese edition have been sold. Some titles have been translated into Spanish and English.

Proof in Mathematics Education

Research, Learning and Teaching

David A. Reid and Christine Knipping

Research on teaching and learning proof and proving has expanded in recent decades. This reflects the growth of mathematics education research in general, but also an increased emphasis on proof in mathematics education. This development is a welcome one for those interested in the topic, but also poses a challenge, especially to teachers and new scholars. It has become more and more difficult to get an overview of the field and to identify the key concepts used in research on proof and proving.

Reforms and Issues in School Mathematics in East Asia

Sharing and Understanding Mathematics Education Policies and Practices

Series:

Edited by Frederick Koon Shing Leung and Yeping Li

Worldwide efforts to improve students’ learning of mathematics have turned educational researchers’ attention to some high-achieving education systems, especially those in East Asia including Chinese Mainland, Hong Kong, Japan, Singapore, South Korea and Taiwan. However, there is much less sharing and learning of educational policy and practices that goes beyond one or two such high-achieving education systems. At this time when educational changes and reforms for improving students’ learning of mathematics are also underway within these high-achieving education systems in East Asia, it becomes timely and important for the world to learn why and how relevant changes take place across these selected education systems. This book has put together a set of papers that individually presents issues on the changing mathematics curriculum and teacher education in the six high-achieving education systems in East Asia. Collectively, the book extends beyond what we can learn about exemplary practices in individual education systems in East Asia. It helps us develop a better understanding of the interplay between various measures for the pursuit of excellence in mathematics curriculum and teacher education on the one hand, and the different system contexts on the other. The intended readers of the book include education policy makers, curriculum developers, researchers, teachers, teacher educators, and anyone else interested in school mathematics curriculum and teacher education.

Science in the Making at the Margin

A Multisited Ethnography of Learning and Becoming in an Afterschool Program, a Garden, and a Math and Science Upward Bound Program

Series:

Jrène Rahm

We know little about diverse youths’ engagement in science outside of school, the form such engagement takes and its impact on science literacy development and identity as a potential insider to science. We need to know more about why, how, and for whom out-of-school settings make a difference. Science in the Making at the Margin offers some answers through an in-depth and theoretically well-grounded multisited ethnography of three very different out-of-school settings: an afterschool program for girls only, a youth garden program, and a Math and Science Upward Bound Program. Grounded in sociocultural-historical theory, this book explores, youths’ meaning making of science and co-constructions of new levels of understandings of science, as well as how they come to position themselves in relation to science through participation in science practices at the margin. The author highlights the multiplicity of learning, becoming and hybridity that constitute the learning of science in the three sites studied. Her analysis suggests that most youth position themselves as science users, as youth who are creating with and learning through science with others in textually rich environments and situations, and in ways that are meaningful to them. Their identity as users of science is grounded in the forms of engagement supported by the three science practices. The challenge is then to leverage such literacy beyond the practices themselves.

Jürgen Maasz and Wolfgang Schlöglmann

During the last fifteen years, research on affect has been of considerable interest to the mathematics education community. Researchers with an interest in mathematics and gender had a look at aspects of affect in their research studies right from the beginning. Similarly many studies of mathematical problem solving had a growing interest in affect. The main focus of research are now student beliefs and teacher beliefs which are identified as important factors for those influencing learning and teaching.
The thirteen chapters of this book involve many aspect of research on affect like theoretical problems of defining beliefs, the complex relationship between content knowledge and affect, espoused beliefs and teaching practice, domain-specific beliefs as well as the relationship between special learning conditions and affective reactions.

Roza Leikin, Abraham Berman and Boris Koichu

This book breaks through in the field of mathematical creativity and giftedness. It suggests directions for closing the gap between research in the field of mathematics education and research in the field of creativity and giftedness. It also outlines a research agenda for further research and development in the field.
The book consists of a balanced set of chapters by mathematicians, mathematics educators, educational psychologists and educational researchers. The authors of different chapters accept dynamic conception of creativity and giftedness.
The book provides analysis of cognitive, affective and social factors associated with the development of creativity in all students and with the realisation of mathematical talent in gifted students. It contains theoretical essays, research reports, historical overviews, recommendations for curricular design, and insights about promotion of mathematical creativity and giftedness at different levels.
The readers will find many examples of challenging mathematical problems intended at developing or examining mathematical creativity and giftedness as well as ideas for direct implementation in school and tertiary mathematics courses. They will also find theoretical models that can be used in researching students’ creativity and giftedness. Research reports enlighten relationships between excellence in mathematics and creativity and examine different aspects of inquiry-based environment as a powerful way for developing mathematical creativity in school students. The readers can also learn about characteristics of creativity of research mathematicians.