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Edited by Celia Popovic

In Learning from Academic Conferences, the editor combines research findings and practical advice aimed at ensuring organizers, attendees and administrators get the most from academic conferences. Contributors from the UK and Canada have pooled their experience and research findings to produce a guide in three parts. Starting with a focus on participants, moving onto presenters and finally addressing organizers, the authors provide comprehensive advice. Conferences are expensive in terms of time and resources; this book will ensure that investment is put to best effect.

Dilemmas and Decisions

A Critical Addition to the Curriculum

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Patrick F. Miller

In Dilemmas and Decisions the author argues that dilemmas, medical, political and personal are clearly universal, requiring decisions with a painful choice. Nevertheless, we are witnessing an increasing tendency amongst opinion leaders, from management consultants to religious fundamentalists, to inform us that dilemmas either do not really exist or are merely problems awaiting the “right” solution (which they happen to possess).

Such moral certainty is dangerously mistaken, breeding extremism and undermining democratic values. Education can become a kind of preparation for Multiple Choice Question-type exams or TV quizzes, with facts recalled under pressure of time and problems needing fast solutions.

Problems, however, are different from dilemmas; they have solutions and disappear as soon as these are found. Dilemmas leave you with an aftertaste and a sense of regret about the rejected alternative.

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Len Cairns and John Stephenson

Capable Workplace Learning is about Capable people, Capable Organisations and an underlying belief in the applicability of the concept of Capability to Work, Place and Learning.
In this book, Cairns and Stephenson present a case for the development of human Capability, in life, in work, and in the lifespace. They trace the development of the Capability concept arguing that it embraces and goes beyond competence. They draw on over 35 years of experience of direct involvement in enhancing adult Capability through education at all levels.
Capability, they also argue, applies as much to organisations and working practices as it does to the individuals involved and call for synergy between organisational and personal capability. Further, the book presents a case that learning through work, whereby people utilise their work experiences and activities as the opportunity, process, place and content of what they are learning whilst they are “working” has, they suggest, established itself as a creditable way of looking at the knowledge development we all encounter and engage with whilst working.
The authors explore a range of examples of Capable practice in business and higher education and present a number of portraits of individuals whose lifework, personifies the Capability at work concept. In addition, they suggest, governments should go beyond the rather narrow aspiration of raising skills levels, to encouraging more people to experience formulating and solving the problem of their own development.

Educational Accountability

Professional Voices From the Field

Edited by Kenneth D. Gariepy, Brenda L. Spencer and J-C Couture

In an age when responses to accountability regimes in education range from hysteria to cynicism, this volume reframes accountability in narratives of collective, participatory responsibility that leave one feeling inspired and ready to act. The authors, all scholar-practitioners speaking from contexts spanning leadership, policy, literacy, indigenous education, and diversity, explore ways to navigate accountability discourses with wisdom, courage and hope.—Tara Fenwick, PhD, Head, Dept. of Educational Studies, University of British Columbia.
In this collection, the preoccupation of educational institutions with accountability is critically examined by writers who work in the field. They consider the impact of accountability regimes on professional practice and the learning agenda, challenge current policies and call for a rethinking of accountability. The skills and knowledge associated with this work is what we should hold schools accountable to. It is, as you see from reading these contributions, time for change.—Stephen Murgatroyd, PhD, Chief Scout, The Innovation Expedition Inc.
About the Book
From their diverse perspectives, nine educational practitioners discuss current educational accountability policies and how these affect students, educators, learning and teaching in a variety of settings, from K-12 schools to post-secondary institutions and government agencies. The authors combine theory, research and their day-to-day experiences to reflect on the challenges posed by realities such as outcomes-based curricula, high-stakes testing, standardized reporting and management by objectives. By examining current accountability initiatives and their effects in relation to core values of public education such as equity, diversity, democracy and opportunity, this book offers educators a range of insights for thinking about and doing education differently.

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Edited by Jarmo Houtsonen and Gun-Britt Wärvik

The book examines nurses’ professional work and life in the context of the ongoing institutional restructuring of health care systems in seven European counties, England, Finland, Greece, Ireland, Portugal, Spain and Sweden. The main idea has been to discuss professional experience and expertise from below, i.e. from the perspective of the nurses and focuses on how they deal with restructuring measures caused by changes in policy and administration. This is not, however, a book about policy implementation and new managerial ideas. Its goal is to examine the complexities and ambiguities in nurses’ work from different theoretical viewpoints. The book also describes both the unique situations and larger societal patterns in which these complexities and ambiguities are embedded. It is intended to contribute to the discussion of and research on nurses as European welfare state professionals.

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Edited by Susan Edwards and Joce Nuttal

Attention has increasingly turned to the preparation and ongoing education of early childhood educators as governments have become increasingly aware of the importance of early childhood education as a key part of educational provision. This collection of case studies in continuing professional learning, drawn from Australia, New Zealand, and the United Kingdom, raises important questions about the nature and purpose of continuing professional learning in ECE by drawing on theories broadly described as 'post-developmental', including postmodernism, cultural-historical theory, sociocultural theory, narrativity, and critical theory. This book will provide a valuable addition to the libraries of teacher educators, professional developers, researchers, practitioners, and students of early childhood education. Taken as a whole, the chapters provide key insights into the complexities of how adults learn in, and about, early childhood settings, and examines the possibilites offered by reaching beyond traditional developmental views of teaching in ECE.

Self-Study Approaches and the Teacher-Inquirer

Instructional situations Case Analysis, Critical Autobiography, and Action Research

Hanna Ezer

This book examines self-study methodologies and their relevance to professional growth among teachers. The book puts forward the following arguments: Self-study as a research approach involves basic research skills, therefore constituting an important step for non-professional inquirers aspiring to more complex research. Self-study is a powerful tool in support of professional growth among teachers. Self-study comprises a set of approaches, among them instructional situations case analysis, critical autobiography, and action research. The book offers some interesting perspectives on the following issues: - The book focuses on the writer’s experience as a teacher educator who has elicited and motivated self-studies among student teachers and teachers. - The book brings together three related self-study methodologies: instructional situations case analysis, critical autobiography, and action research. - The book offers a new perspective on implementing and analyzing instructional situation cases through the "authentic case of teaching" and the "expected case of teaching, " a perspective developed by the writer and implemented in her classes. - The book provides a fresh view of critical autobiography as a powerful tool teachers can use to examine their own practice and professional development. - The book introduces critical discourse analysis as a useful tool for researchers. This tool enables teacher-inquirers to reveal their’sense of professional self' and their professional identity as it emerges in teaching cases they provide. - Teachers and researchers can easily apply the methodologies described in this book to their own teaching and research arenas.

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Edited by Cynthia A. Lassonde and Sally Galman

Study Research Methodologies for Teacher Educators is a comprehensive text that delineates a range of research methodologies. This edited volume, with many chapters written by self-study scholars who are noted in the field for particular methodological and epistemological perspectives, helps fill the gap in the literature on self-study research methods. It provides readers with an opportunity to examine various methodologies which will not only help them deepen their understanding of research but also, will allow them to select one that best suits their needs. Both new and experienced researchers will find this text valuable. We consider Self-Study Research Methodologies for Teacher Educators a valuable contribution to the field of teacher education.

Teachers' Professional Development

Aims, Modules, Evaluation

Edited by Frank Achtenhagen, Fritz K. Oser and Ursula Renold

Within the central topics of the debate on teachers’ professionalism are the problems of research-based and evidence-based initial and lifelong teacher behavior. Although the statements on professional similarities of teacher actions with those of other (academic) professionals are very plausible, there remains a central task for teacher education programs: How to develop towards such expertise—which is equal to evidence convictions—effectively and efficiently. Which role do scientific research and its results play in this context? How can research results be converted into recommendations for teacher actions?
The contributions to this book focus on central problems of the conversion process: In the first part the goal dimension is treated: Maiello & Oser emphasize the relationship of central variables of teacher behaviour as identity, professional satisfaction or self-efficacy to teachers’ professional behaviour; Blömeke, Felbrich & Müller discuss the role of future teachers’ beliefs on the nature of mathematics; Stevenson uses cultural historical activity theory to work out cognitive schemas that can be targeted in vocational teacher education; Gruber tackles the problem of how vocational teachers can be supported to become experts by discussing especially four major possible research strategies.
The second part of this book is dedicated to possible intervention approaches by which the gap of theory and practice shall be bridged. Steiner & Steiner report on critical learning incidents which heavily influence the micro-processes which characterize teachers’ instructional measures; Winther differentiates the trait and state perspective of motivation with regard to their consequences for the learning process; Boekaerts focuses on aspects of collaborative learning; Weber sharpens her deliberations explicitly to a design experiment on the problem of initiating intercultural learning.
The third part of this book is a report of the use and the consequences of Oser’s model of teaching standards. Baer, Dörr, Fraefel, Kocher, Kiester, Larcher, Müller, Sempert & Wyss show results of a large study on the development of teacher competences run in Switzerland and Germany. The study observes the competence development of prospective teachers from the beginning of their teaching training up to the job entry phase. This book is published under the auspices of the Swiss Federal Office for Professional Education and Technology.

Trajectories

The Social and Educational Mobility of Education Scholars From Poor and Working Class Backgrounds

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Edited by Jane A. Van Galen and Van O. Dempsey

Trajectories: The Educational and Social Mobility of Educators from the Poor and Working Class, is a collection of mobility narratives of critical scholars in education from poor and working-class backgrounds.
While Americans have long held deep-seated cultural beliefs in the capacity of schooling to level unequal playing fields, there has been little research on the psycho-social processes of social and educational mobility in the United States. Rising Up employs narrative research methodologies to interrogate the experiences of class border-crossing via success in school.
This volume addresses two discourses within education: First, the experiences of those who have crossed class boundaries contribute to a deeper understanding of how social class functions in the United States. The narratives compiled in this volume explore class within the lives of young people on the margins, as identities, ambition and achievement are constructed and negotiated in school.
More specifically, the volume suggests new directions for policy and practice to counteract classism in schools and in the broader culture. As they write of the constraints that they circumvented to succeed against the odds, these authors complicate notions of opportunity as the inevitable reward for high achievement. As they write of agency and tenacity, they will illuminate cultural strengths that likely were invisible to teachers and peers. As critical scholars of education, the contributors to this volume speak specifically to ways in which teacher education can and should address issues of class.