Series:

Kimberly Dark

The Daddies is a love letter to masculinity, a kaleidoscope of its pleasures and horrors. The question “Who’s your Daddy?” started showing up in mainstream cultural references during the 1990s. Those words can be spoken as a question, or a challenge, as a flirtation, a joke, or a threat. It’s all about inflection, intention, and who’s asking. Apparently, we have so much shared cultural meaning about “Daddy” the speakers and listeners can simply intuit meaning and proceed to laugh at the joke, or experience the shame, as appropriate. But who is Daddy in American culture? The Daddies aims to find out more than who – but how the process of knowing Daddy can prompt readers to know themselves and their society. This allegory about patriarchy unfolds as a kinky lesbian Daddy/girl love story. Daddy-ness is situated in all people, after all, and we each share responsibility for creating a fairer world. The Daddies can be used as a springboard for discussion in courses in sociology, gender and women's studies, cultural studies, sexuality studies and communication. As a work of fiction, The Daddies can also be enjoyed by general audiences.

The Negotiated Self

Employing Reflexive Inquiry to Explore Teacher Identity

Edited by Ellyn Lyle

Teacher identity resides in the foundational beliefs and assumptions educators have about teaching and learning. These beliefs and assumptions develop both inside and outside of the classroom, blurring the lines between the professional and the personal. Examining the development of teacher identity at this intersection requires a unique reflexive capacity.

Reflexive inquiry is both established and continually emerging. At its most basic, reflexivity refers to researchers’ consciousness of their role in and effect on both the act of doing research and arriving at research findings. In making central the role of the researcher in the research process, reflexive inquiry interrogates agency while examining philosophical notions about the nature of knowledge.

While advancements have been made in investigating the relationship between teacher knowledge and teacher practice, the research often fails to connect this meaning with self-knowledge and issues of identity. Through a consideration of these tenets, the authors in this collection embrace critical, qualitative, creative, and arts-integrated approaches to examine ways that reflexive inquiry supports studies in teacher identity. Moving between theory and lived experience, the authors individually and collectively lay bare teacher identity as negotiated while evidencing the epistemological merits of reflexive inquiry.

Lauren Stephenson, Barbara Harold and Rashida Badri

In a world of constant change, the ongoing education and empowerment of women is a transformation of profound significance. In the UAE, and in Dubai in particular, the emergence of women into positions of leadership has accelerated over the past thirty years and continues to gather pace, reflecting a worldwide trend. Emirati women's entry into leadership positions in all fields has resulted in social and economic benefits across education, health, commerce and community services – all of which have strengthened the role of women at the grassroots level. As the world grows smaller, the global circle of opportunity for women grows wider. Throughout the UAE and all across the globe women are assuming their rightful place as leaders in education and in society.


The authors conducted a ten-year collaborative narrative research project culminating in a book of jointly constructed stories of five exceptional female Emirati educational leaders. The five women from Dubai are Raja Al Gurg, Raya Rashid, Fatima Al Marri, Rafia Abbas, and Rashida Badri. Through stories of lived experience, this book recognizes the expertise and contributions of these women to the fields of education and leadership; provides exemplars for educators; demonstrates to younger generations what successes and challenges this generation of women faced in order to achieve recognition as successful women and members of the local, regional, and global community; and makes their leadership perspectives and experiences accessible and engaging for all types of audiences.

Lee Baldwin

In Research Concepts for the Practitioner of Educational Leadership, the author acquaints the reader with principles of educational research that are most applicable to today’s educational leaders. Educational leaders are facing increasing demands to analyze data and use research to make instructional decisions. School-based educational leaders are facing these demands as well as those in educational leadership at other levels such as school districts and foundations. Instructional leaders are finding it increasingly difficult to lead without having a firm grasp of using data to make informed instructional decisions. This book helps to bridge the gap between the complex world of data analysis with the ever-changing dynamics of education leadership.

Lauren Stephenson, Barbara Harold and Rashida Badri

In a world of constant change, the ongoing education and empowerment of women is a transformation of profound significance. In the UAE, and in Dubai in particular, the emergence of women into positions of leadership has accelerated over the past thirty years and continues to gather pace, reflecting a worldwide trend. Emirati women's entry into leadership positions in all fields has resulted in social and economic benefits across education, health, commerce and community services – all of which have strengthened the role of women at the grassroots level. As the world grows smaller, the global circle of opportunity for women grows wider. Throughout the UAE and all across the globe women are assuming their rightful place as leaders in education and in society.


The authors conducted a ten-year collaborative narrative research project culminating in a book of jointly constructed stories of five exceptional female Emirati educational leaders. The five women from Dubai are Raja Al Gurg, Raya Rashid, Fatima Al Marri, Rafia Abbas, and Rashida Badri. Through stories of lived experience, this book recognizes the expertise and contributions of these women to the fields of education and leadership; provides exemplars for educators; demonstrates to younger generations what successes and challenges this generation of women faced in order to achieve recognition as successful women and members of the local, regional, and global community; and makes their leadership perspectives and experiences accessible and engaging for all types of audiences.

Series:

Edited by Celia Popovic

In Learning from Academic Conferences, the editor combines research findings and practical advice aimed at ensuring organizers, attendees and administrators get the most from academic conferences. Contributors from the UK and Canada have pooled their experience and research findings to produce a guide in three parts. Starting with a focus on participants, moving onto presenters and finally addressing organizers, the authors provide comprehensive advice. Conferences are expensive in terms of time and resources; this book will ensure that investment is put to best effect.

Creativities in Arts Education, Research and Practice

International Perspectives for the Future of Learning and Teaching

Series:

Edited by Leon R. de Bruin, Pamela Burnard and Susan Davis

In Creativities in Arts Education, Research and Practice: International Perspectives for the Future of Learning and Teaching, Leon de Bruin, Pamela Burnard and Susan Davis provide new thinking, ideas and practices concerned with philosophically, pedagogically and actively developing arts learning and teaching. Interrogating successes and challenges for creativity education locally/globally/glocally, and using illustrative cases and examples drawn from education, practice and research, they explore unique local practices, agendas, glocalised perspectives and ways arts learning develops diverse creativities in order to produce new approaches and creative ecologies through inter- and cross-disciplinary teaching practices interconnecting beyond arts domains. This book highlights innovative approaches and perspectives to activating and promoting diverse creativities as new forms of authorship and analytic approaches within arts practice and education, along with the production of adaptable, sustainable pedagogies that promote and produce diverse creativities differently. This book will help educators, artists, and researchers understand and fully utilise ways they can transform their thinking and practice and keep their learning and teaching on the move.



Contributors are: Christine Bottrell, Pamela Burnard, Peter Cook. Susan Davis, Elizabeth Dobson, Leon R. de Bruin, Tatjana Dragovic, Martin Fautley, Robyn Heckenberg, Susanne Jasilek, Fiona King, Sharon Lierse, Shari Lindblom, Megan McPherson, Sarah Jane Moore, Amy Mortimer, Alison O'Grady, Mark Selkrig, Susan Wright.

Doing Educational Research

A Handbook (Second Edition)

Series:

Edited by Kenneth Tobin and Shirley R. Steinberg

In the second edition of Doing Educational Research, we explore a variety of critical issues and methodologies. Authors include some of the most influential voices selected from across the spectrum of career disciplines. The scholars provide detailed insights into dimensions of the research process that engage both students and experienced researchers with key concepts and recent innovations in the art of doing research.
The contributors adopt a stance that is practical as it introduces beginning scholars to social inquiry, and innovative as it transforms the boundaries of conversations about educational research. Doing Educational Research appears at a critical moment in which educational researchers are pushed to align with a pervasive scientism that embraces tenets of crypto-positivism.
The book addresses logics of inquiry, underpinning cutting-edge approaches to educational research that extend far beyond limited visions that are presented through the lenses of positivism. The chapters explore a variety of methodologies including action research, bricolage, ethnography, hermeneutics, historiography, media-based research, psychoanalysis, and conversation analysis, in a matrix of social theory, authentic inquiry, critical pedagogy, and differences in epistemology, ontology, and axiology. A diverse array of complex topics are presented in accessible forms and will compel both scholars and students.

Edited by Alison Williams, Derek Jones and Judy Robertson

FREELY AVAILABLE ONLINE AS OPEN ACCESS BOOK!

BITE: Recipes for remarkable research is an edited field book capturing the research, learning and experiences of an international network of scholars studying effective and creative research environments. The book encapsulates what it is that enables remarkable research, and offers, as Professor Lizbeth Goodman says, “practical, evidence-based instantiations of ideas and innovations” as well as theoretical knowledge. It is set out as a recipe book, with supporting academic papers and case studies.
The recipes present research and advice from a wide range of subject areas in an instantly recognisable format. Each recipe enables the reader to take practical steps to understand and develop their own research at all levels, from personal solo work and group collaborations, to an institutional and architectural dimension.
Whether you are a PhD student, early career researcher, professor or decision-maker, these recipes, case studies and papers invite you to consider research habits, approaches and environments in interesting and different ways.
Bold Visions in Educational Research was co-founded by Joe L. Kincheloe and Kenneth Tobin for the purposes of publishing cutting edge research that incorporated incisive insights supported by rich theoretical frameworks. The editors stance was that scholars with bold visions would pave the way for the transformation of educational policies and practices. In conjunction with this idea of encouraging theoretically rich research, the editors planned a series of Pioneers—first readers in a given field. Pioneers are written for educators seeking entry into a field of study. Each Pioneer is a “starter”; an introduction to an area of scholarship, providing well-developed, theory-rich, jargon-free texts about current, state-of-the-art research that affords deep understandings of an area and lays the foundation for further studies in the same and related areas. The books are excellent texts for graduate studies, useful resources for professional development programs, and handy reference readers for early career researchers.