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The New Economics (Theory and Practice): 1922-1928
Evgeny A. Preobrazhensky was Russia’s foremost economist in the 1920s. This volume editorially reconstructs his theory of socialist industrialisation in an agrarian country and relates it to previous socialist theories and to issues of political struggle, culture and communist morality. The editors create a unique portrait of Preobrazhensky as an economist and social theorist, assess the viability of NEP as a model of economic growth, and identify the fault lines that contributed to the split in the Trotskyist Opposition and its defeat in the struggle against Stalin. The bulk of the work consists of the important An Attempt to Provide a Theoretical Analysis of the Soviet Economy, while the material in Volume III focuses on concrete analysis.
Evgeny A. Preobrazhensky was Russia’s foremost economist in the 1920s. This volume editorially reconstructs his theory of socialist industrialisation in an agrarian country and relates it to previous socialist theories and to issues of political struggle, culture and communist morality. The bulk of the work consists of Preobrazhensky’s Concrete Analysis of the Soviet Economy, which supplements his theoretical inquiry published in Volume II. A number of appendices present Preobrazhensky’s analysis of the NEP and his correspondence with Trotsky alongside extensive contributions by the volume’s editors and translators.
Volume Editors: Walter Pohl and Veronika Wieser
This book compares the ways in which new powers arose in the shadows of the Roman Empire and its Byzantine and Carolingian successors, of Iran, the Caliphate and China in the first millennium CE. These new powers were often established by external military elites who had served the empire. They remained in an uneasy balance with the remaining empire, could eventually replace it, or be drawn into the imperial sphere again. Some relied on dynastic legitimacy, others on ethnic identification, while most of them sought imperial legitimation. Across Eurasia, their dynamic was similar in many respects; why were the outcomes so different?
Contributors are Alexander Beihammer, Maaike van Berkel, Francesco Borri, Andrew Chittick, Michael R. Drompp, Stefan Esders, Ildar Garipzanov, Jürgen Paul, Walter Pohl, Johannes Preiser-Kapeller, Helmut Reimitz, Jonathan Shepard, Q. Edward Wang, Veronika Wieser, and Ian N. Wood.
Volume Editors: Alyssa DeBlasio and Victoria Juharyan
This volume explores the influence of the Socratic legacy in the Russian, East European, and Soviet contexts. For writers, philosophers, and artists, Socrates has served as a potent symbol—of the human capacity for philosophical reflection, as well as the tumultuous (and often dangerous) reality in which Russian-speaking and Soviet intellectuals found themselves. The thirteen chapters include surveys of historical periods and movements (the 18th century, Nietzscheanism, and the “Greek Renaissance” of Russian culture), studies of individual writers and philosophers (Skovoroda, Herzen, Dostoevsky, Rozanov, Bely, Narbut, and many others), and investigations of Socratic subtexts (e.g., in Bulgakov’s Master and Margarita and Nosov’s Neznaika series for children). The volume concludes with a “Socratic Texts” section of new translations. The plurality of these topics demonstrates the continued relevance of the Socratic myth not only for Russian-speaking culture, but for the world.
Leben und Sterben einer polnisch-jüdischen Stadt: Tarnów 1918–1945
Series:  FOKUS, Volume: 5
Dies ist die Geschichte einer Stadt in Polen, Tarnów, in den Jahren 1918–1945, in der die Hälfte der Bevölkerung vor dem Zweiten Weltkrieg jüdisch war. Die große Mehrheit der Juden in Polen lebte in Städten und ihre Geschichte eröffnet eine alternative Sichtweise auf die Geschichte Polens.
Das Buch erzählt über den Alltag des multiethnischen Tarnów, überschreitet aber zeitliche Zäsuren und beschreibt, wie das soziale Gewebe zerriss, als die Deutschen 1939 einmarschierten. Diese Studie zeigt auf, wie sich das Verhältnis der nichtjüdischen Polen zu ihren jüdischen Nachbarn während des Holocaust wandelte und wie letztere um ihr Überleben kämpften. Durch das Prisma einer Stadt werden die wichtigsten Fragen polnisch-jüdischer Beziehungsgeschichte gestellt, u.a. zur Rolle der nichtjüdischen Polen während des Holocaust und zum Antisemitismus im Polen der Nachkriegszeit.
Transylvania has some of the most valuable monuments of medieval architecture in Europe. The oldest church was built in the 10th century, but most others came into being only after 1200. Later changes have considerably modified the appearance of still-standing buildings. Written sources are lacking for answers to questions about the identity of the builders and patrons. Countering the idea that only standing structures can reflect the history of medieval churches in Transylvania, this book uses archaeological sources in order to answer some of those questions and to bring to light the hidden past of many monuments.