Nature Conservation in Southern Africa

Morality and Marginality: Towards Sentient Conservation?

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Edited by Jan-Bart Gewald, Marja Spierenburg and Harry Wels

Nature conservation in southern Africa has always been characterised by an interplay between Capital, specific understandings of Morality, and forms of Militarism, that are all dependent upon the shared subservience and marginalization of animals and certain groups of people in society. Although the subjectivity of people has been rendered visible in earlier publications on histories of conservation in southern Africa, the subjectivity of animals is hardly ever seriously considered or explicitly dealt with. In this edited volume the subjectivity and sentience of animals is explicitly included. The contributors argue that the shared human and animal marginalisation and agency in nature conservation in southern Africa (and beyond) could and should be further explored under the label of ‘sentient conservation’.

Contributors are Malcolm Draper, Vupenyu Dzingirai, Jan-Bart Gewald, Michael Glover, Paul Hebinck, Tariro Kamuti, Lindiwe Mangwanya, Albert Manhamo, Dhoya Snijders, Marja Spierenburg, Sandra Swart, Harry Wels.

The Narrative of Mathematics Teachers

Elementary School Mathematics Teachers’ Features of Education, Knowledge, Teaching and Personality

Edited by Dorit Patkin and Avikam Gazit

The issue of mathematics teaching and its impact on learners' attainments in this subject has continuously been on the public agenda. The anthology of chapters in this book consists of varied up-to-date studies of some of the best mathematics education researchers and mathematics teaching experts, exploring the varied aspects of this essential. The book depicts the elementary school mathematics teachers' world while relating to three aspects which comprise the professional environment of mathematics teachers: Teachers' education and teachers' knowledge, Teaching and Teachers' personality. The chapters are written on a level which addresses and might interest a wide readership: researchers, in-service teachers, pre-service teachers, parents and learners.

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Carmen Cusack

Fish, Justice, and Society is an in-depth look into the fishing industry, fish, and aquatic environments. This book delves past the façade of what may be known by the average fisherman, bringing to the surface new information about numerous species and aquatic habitats. It is the most comprehensive book on the subject of fish, law, and human behavior. It is a standalone work, but complements Cusack’s Fish in the Bible (2017). It is a treatise on the subject of animal law while also serving the common fisherman information on compliance issues.

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John McNutt, Chao Guo, Lauri Goldkind and Seongho An

Information and communication technologies (ICT) are major forces shaping our current age. ICT affects many areas of human existence and influences the both human wellbeing and human evil. The nonprofit sector is already heavily involved in technology both as a way to pursue its mission and as an influential factor in the evolution of the sector. This article examines how technology affects the sector and how the sector uses technology in its work.
The article begins with a discussion of how the emerging information society will change the nonprofit sector. The sector that we know is grounded on our experience in the agrarian and industrial periods in the United States and Europe. We then explore how technology evolved in the sector. This is followed by an examination of technology and nonprofit organizational behavior. Technology changes the organizations that make use of its capacities. Next is a discussion of the types of technology that nonprofit organizations use. The final three sections deal with technology and social change, technology in nonprofit settings, and issues and trends. This article provides the reader with a current appreciation of the scholarly and professional literature on ICT in the nonprofit sector.

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Edited by Charles Fransen

This volume is dedicated to the memory of the eminent carcinologist Michael Türkay, of the Research Institute and Natural History Museum Senckenberg, Frankfurt am Main, Germany. It is a tribute to his outstanding international contribution to the study of decapod crustaceans. An extensive account of Michael’s life and achievements is presented, along with thirty-one scientific papers by 62 of his friends and colleagues from around the world. The book’s focus is almost entirely on decapod crustaceans, and covers a variety of topics, including taxonomy, systematics, zoogeography, morphology, palaeontology, genetics, general biology and ecology. Numerous new taxa are described from a number of marine and freshwater groups, including one new genus and 13 new species named in honour of Michael himself.

The contents of this volume were originally published in 2017 in Crustaceana volume 90, issue 7-10.

Art and Science in Word and Image

Exploration and Discovery

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Edited by Keith Williams, Sophie Aymes, Jan Baetens and Chris Murray

Art and Science in Word and Image investigates the theme of ‘riddles of form’, exploring how discovery and innovation have functioned inter-dependently between art, literature and the sciences.

Using the impact of evolutionary biologist D’Arcy Thompson’s On Growth and Form on Modernist practices as springboard into the theme, contributors consider engagements with mysteries of natural form in painting, photography, fiction, etc., as well as theories about cosmic forces, and other fields of knowledge and enquiry. Hence the collection also deals with topics including cultural inscriptions of gardens and landscapes, deconstructions of received history through word and image artworks and texts, experiments in poetic materiality, graphic re-mediations of classic fiction, and textual transactions with animation and photography.

Contributors are: Dina Aleshina, Márcia Arbex, Donna T. Canada Smith, Calum Colvin, Francis Edeline, Philippe Enrico, Étienne Février, Madeline B. Gangnes, Eric T. Haskell, Christina Ionescu, Tim Isherwood, Matthew Jarron, Philippe Kaenel, Judy Kendall, Catherine Lanone, Kristen Nassif, Solange Ribeiro de Oliveira, Eric Robertson, Frances Robertson, Cathy Roche-Liger, David Skilton, Melanie Stengele, Barry Sullivan, Alice Tarbuck, Frederik Van Dam.

Archostemata-Myxophaga-Adephaga

Revised and Updated Edition

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Edited by Ivan Löbl and Daniel Löbl

This new edition of the Catalogue of Palaearctic Coleoptera gives a taxonomic overview of the most diverse group of all organisms living in the world-largest biogeographical area. The present volume is an updated edition of the first issue in 2003 but restricted to data published before the year 2000. It contains information about 33,914 taxa (together with synonyms), and increases the number of included species and other taxa by almost 5,000. In addition, thousands of species have their distributional data completed, and their ranks, systematic positions and nomenclature corrected. Almost two hundred new acts fix systematics and nomenclature, and numerous problems are discussed. Even such well known genera as Calosoma and Carabus, or tribes as Bembidiini and Panagaeini, are completely reorganized compared to the previously published catalogues. Thus, the work is a scaffold for biotic surveys, ecological studies, and nature conservation. It responds to the urgent need of an assessment of the still remaining forms of life, threatened by the on-going destruction of habitats. Taxonomy provides the basic building blocks of our understanding of the diversity of life. It stems from innate human curiosity: confronted with an unknown species we ask first “what is it”? Taxonomists recognize species and other systematic entities (taxa), define them and place them within the framework of known organisms, providing means for their subsequent identification.

Contributors are: Antonio Tomás Tomas Andújar, Carmelo Fernández Andújar, Michael Balkenohl, Igor Belousov, Yves Bousquet, Boleslav Březina, Achille Casale, Hans Fery, Jan Farkač, Pier Mauro Giachino, Henri Goulet, Martin Häckel, Jiří Hájek, Oldřich Hovorka, Fritz Hieke, Jan Hrdlička, Charles Huber, Bernd Jaeger, Ilya Kabak, Boris M. Kataev, Erich Kirschenhofer, Tomáš Kopecký, Ivan Löbl, Werner Marggi, Andrey Matalin, Wendy Moore, Peter Nagel, Paolo Neri, Sergio Pérez González, Alexandr Putchkov, James A. Robertson, Joachim Schmidt, José Serrano, Luca Toledano, Uldis Valainis, Bernhard J. van Vondel, David W. Wrase, Juan M. Pérez Zaballos, Alexandr S. Zamotajlov.

Art and Adaptability

Consciousness and Cognitive Culture

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Gregory F. Tague

Art and Adaptability argues for a co-evolution of theory of mind and material/art culture. The book covers relevant areas from great ape intelligence, hominin evolution, Stone Age tools, Paleolithic culture and art forms, to neurobiology. We use material and art objects, whether painting or sculpture, to modify our own and other people’s thoughts so as to affect behavior. We don’t just make judgments about mental states; we create objects about which we make judgments in which mental states are inherent. Moreover, we make judgments about these objects to facilitate how we explore the minds and feelings of others. The argument is that it’s not so much art because of theory of mind but art as theory of mind.

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Xueming Chen

Edited by Lihuan Wu and Baixiang Liu

The worsening environmental crisis has become a serious threat to mankind. The search for a solution to this crisis must begin by understanding its causes. Taking an eco-socialist perspective, The Ecological Crisis and the Logic of Capital explores the logic of capitalism as a fundamental cause of today’s environmental crisis, in particular the thirst for profit and the capitalist mode of production. By demonstrating the inherent antagonism between capital and ecology, this book argues that proposals to resolve the crisis within the capitalist system are utopian, that proposed remedies relying on scientific progress, alternative energies, low-carbon technologies or the introduction of ecological ethics and new attitudes toward Nature into market mechanisms are doomed to failure without a radical overhaul of the principles that govern capitalism.