Author: Rana Habibi
In Modern Middle-Class Housing in Tehran – Reproduction of an Archetype, Rana Habibi offers an engaging analysis of the modern urban history of Tehran during the Cold War period: 1945–1979. The book, while arguing about the institutionalism of modernity in the form of modern middle-class housing in Tehran, shows how vernacular archetypes found their way into the construction of new neighborhoods. The trajectory of ideal modernism towards popular modernism, the introduction of modern taste to traditional society through architects, while tracing the path of transnational models in local projects, are all subjects extensively expounded by Rana Habibi through engaging graphical analyses and appealing theoretical interpretations involving five modern Tehran neighborhoods.
Picturing Death: 1200-1600 explores the visual culture of mortality over the course of four centuries that witnessed a remarkable flourishing of imagery focused on the themes of death, dying, and the afterlife. In doing so, this volume sheds light on issues that unite two periods—the Middle Ages and the Renaissance—that are often understood as diametrically opposed. The studies collected here cover a broad visual terrain, from tomb sculpture to painted altarpieces, from manuscripts to printed books, and from minute carved objects to large-scale architecture. Taken together, they present a picture of the ways that images have helped humans understand their own mortality, and have incorporated the deceased into the communities of the living.

Jessica Barker, Katherine Boivin, Peter Bovenmyer, Xavier Dectot, Maja Dujakovic, Brigit Ferguson, Alison C. Fleming, Fredrika Jacobs, Henrike C. Lange, Robert Marcoux, Walter S. Melion, Stephen Perkinson, Johanna Scheel, Mary Silcox, Judith Steinhoff, Noa Turel
Author: Ghazwan Yaghi
Mamluk Palaces and Houses in Cairo studies the types of extant residential buildings in Cairo from the Mamluk era (1250-1517 C.E.) and the factors affecting their design, architectural and decorative elements, and building materials. It provides an archaeological, architectural, historical, and documentary study of all the surviving palaces and houses, focussing on the structural and architectural status of its various parts. The author also sheds light on its present-day restoration and rehabilitation projects.
In this book, Ghazwan Yaghi presents a variety of empirical material that sheds more light on the social and economic history of the Mamluk era, as well as a glossary of archaeological and documentary terminology that could serve as a tool for further research in Islamic architecture.

القصور والبيوت المملوكية في القاهرة يدرس أنواع المباني السكنية الموجودة في القاهرة من العصر المملوكي (1250-1517 م) والعوامل المؤثرة في تصميمها، وعناصرها المعمارية والزخرفية، ومواد بناءها، إضافة لتقديم دراسة أثرية ومعمارية وتاريخية ووثائقية لكل القصور والبيوت الباقية، مع التركيز على الحالة الإنشائية والمعمارية لكافة أجزاءها، وملقية الضوء على مشاريع ترميمها وإعادة تأهيلها حتى الوقت الحالي.
في هذا الكتاب، يقدم غزوان ياغي مادة ثرية تساهم في زيادة فهمنا للتاريخ الاجتماعي والاقتصادي للعصر المملوكي، كما يوفر مسرد المصطلحات الأثرية والوثائقية مادة علمية تزيد من فهمنا للعمارة السكنية الإسلامية التي يأتي المنتج المعماري فيها معبراً بصورة دقيقة عن أصحابه سواء منهم من أمر به أو من قام بتنفيذه.
An Essay on Themes, Differences, and Similarities
Author: Thomas Barrie
In Architecture of the World’s Major Religions: An Essay on Themes, Differences, and Similarities, Thomas Barrie presents and explains religious architecture in ways that challenge predominant presumptions regarding its aesthetic, formal, spatial, and scenographic elements. Two positions frame its narrative: religious architecture is an amalgam of aesthetic, social, political, cultural, economic, and doctrinal elements; and these elements are materialized in often very different ways in the world’s principal religions. Central to the work’s theoretical approaches is the communicative and discursive agency of religious architecture, and the multisensory and ritual spaces it provides to create and deliver content. Subsequently, mythical and scriptural foundations, and symbols of ecclesiastical and political power are of equal interest to formal organizations of thresholds, paths, courts, and centers, and celestial and geometric alignments. Moreover, it is equally concerned with the aesthetic, visual and material cultures and the transcendent realms they were designed to evoke, as it is with the kinesthetic, the dynamic and multisensory experience of place and the tangible experiences of the body’s interactions with architecture.
Byzantium in Eastern European Visual Culture in the Late Middle Ages, edited by Maria Alessia Rossi and Alice Isabella Sullivan, engages with issues of cultural contact and patronage, as well as the transformation and appropriation of Byzantine artistic, theological, and political models, alongside local traditions, across Eastern Europe. The regions of the Balkan Peninsula, the Carpathian Mountains, and early modern Russia have been treated in scholarship within limited frameworks or excluded altogether from art historical conversations. This volume encourages different readings of the artistic landscapes of Eastern Europe during the late medieval period, highlighting the cultural and artistic productions of individual centers. These ought to be considered individually and as part of larger networks, thus revealing their shared heritage and indebtedness to artistic and cultural models adopted from elsewhere, and especially from Byzantium.
Author: Kersti Markus
Focusing on visual sources and the cultural landscape, Kersti Markus offers a fresh perspective on the Baltic crusades in Visual Culture and Politics in the Baltic Sea Region, 1100-1250. The book examines how visual propaganda was used by the Danish rulers as an instrument in establishing supremacy in the Baltic Sea region.

In recent decades, Danish historians have highlighted the central role of the Valdemar dynasty and the bishops supporting them in the Baltic crusades, but visual sources show how the entire society was mentally prepared for a journey with redemption waiting at the end. A New Jerusalem was being built in Scandinavia, and the crusade to Livonia was conducted under the banner of Christ.
‘All history is world history’ – but the history of architecture and urbanism is not. It has been written from numerous biased perspectives: the history of the former colonies from that of Europe, the history of twentieth century architecture from that of modernism, the history of Central and Eastern Europe from that of the ‘West’ – and we could expand this list indefinitely. Supporting a historical approach with a historiographical angle, Brill Studies in Architectural and Urban History welcomes books that respect and restore the global dimension of architecture and urbanism, critically re-evaluate existing bodies of knowledge, and are the result of thorough research that are largely based on primary sources. The series has no geographical or temporal limitations – we’re happy to accommodate books on renaissance Italy as well as studies on South-African shanty towns, the main focus of the series being its international and critical approach.

The peer reviewed series accommodates English language scholarly monographs, collections of essays, conference proceedings, and works of reference.
New Directions and Paradigms for the Study of Greek Architecture comprises 20 chapters by nearly three dozen scholars who describe recent discoveries, new theoretical frameworks, and applications of cutting-edge techniques in their architectural research. The contributions are united by several broad themes that represent the current directions of study in the field, i.e.: the organization and techniques used by ancient Greek builders and designers; the use and life history of Greek monuments over time; the communication of ancient monuments with their intended audiences together with their reception by later viewers; the mining of large sets of architectural data for socio-economic inference; and the recreation and simulation of audio-visual experiences of ancient monuments and sites by means of digital technologies.
The Armenian Contribution to Military Architecture in the Middle Ages
In Medieval Fortifications in Cilicia Dweezil Vandekerckhove offers an account of the origins, development and spatial distribution of fortified sites in the Armenian Kingdom (1198-1375). Despite the abundance of archaeological remains, the Armenian heritage had previously not been closely studied. However, through the examination of known and newly identified castles, this work has now increased the number of sites and features associated with the Armenian Kingdom.
By the construction of numerous powerful castles, the Armenians succeeded in establishing an independent kingdom, which lasted until the Mamluk conquest in 1375. Dweezil Vandekerckhove convincingly proves that the medieval castles in Cilicia are of outstanding architectural interest, with a significant place in the history of military architecture.
From Biblical Israel to Modern Judaism
Editor: Steven Fine
Jewish Religious Architecture explores ways that Jews have expressed their tradition in brick and mortar and wood, in stone and word and spirit. This volume stretches from the biblical Tabernacle to Roman Jerusalem, synagogues spanning two millenia and on to contemporary Judaism. Social historians, cultural historians, art historians and philologists have come together here to present this extraordinary architectural tradition. The multidisciplinary approach employed in Jewish Religious Architecture reveals deep continuities over time, together with the distinctly local— sometimes in surprising ways.