Zum Verhältnis von Ästhetik und Religion in der Moderne
Ästhetische Formen sind Kristallisationspunkte kultureller, religiöser und politischer Konflikte. Dies gilt, sofern sie religiös determinierten und legitimierten Bedeutungssystemen angehören. Sie stehen im Horizont bestimmter Klassifikationsschemata, epistemischer Unterscheidungen, unterschiedlicher Konzeptionen von Sprache und sozialer Normativität.
Der Band fragt nach der Rolle und Funktion »autonomer« Kunst im Säkularisierungsprozess. Dieser ist nicht zuletzt durch die insistierende Präsenz christlicher Referenzen in der modernen europäischen Kunst gekennzeichnet. In Frage steht damit aber, dass die Kunst der Moderne sich in einem a-religiösen oder post-religiösen Raum bewegt. Umgekehrt liegt die Vermutung nahe, dass die säkulare Signatur der modernen Kunst erst vor dem Hintergrund des Christentums verständlich wird.
Eine Untersuchung anhand der Rechtsprechung der Römischen Rota
Das kirchliche Prozessrecht manifestiert sich in einem detailreichen Normenkomplex, der nur selten in den Blick wissenschaftlicher Untersuchung gerät. Grund genug, einigen Detailfragen Raum zu geben, die gleichzeitig paradigmatische Problemanzeigen für den gegenwärtigen Zustand kirchlicher Rechtskultur darstellen.Neben der eigentlichen Hauptsache können im kanonischen Prozess auch so genannte akzessorische Fragen auftreten, die von der Hauptsache abhängig sind, aber eine eigene richterliche Entscheidung verlangen. Die auf derartige Fragen fokussierte Untersuchung der Rechtsprechung der Römischen Rota offenbart einen höchst bedenklichen Zustand des geltenden Prozessrechts. Ist der Untergang des kanonischen Prozesses längst besiegelt?
Brill’s Encyclopedia of Global Pentecostalism Online (BEGP) provides a comprehensive overview of worldwide Pentecostalism from a range of disciplinary perspectives. It offers analysis at the level of specific countries and regions, historical figures, movements and organizations, and particular topics and themes. The online version of the Encyclopedia is already available. See here.
Pentecostal Studies draws upon areas of research such as anthropology, biblical studies, economics, gender studies, global studies, history, political science, sociology, theological studies, and other areas of related interest. The BEGP emphasizes this multi-disciplinary approach and includes scholarship from a range of disciplines, methods, and theoretical perspectives. Moreover, the BEGP is cross-cultural and transnational, including contributors from around the world to represent key insights on Pentecostalism from a range of countries and regions.
Providing summaries of the key literature, the BEGP will be the standard reference for Pentecostal Studies. All articles are organized alphabetically with bibliographic information on scholarly work and directions for further reading.
Anglicanism in the Age of Enlightenment and Romanticism
In his The Life and Theology of Alexander Knox, David McCready highlights one of the most important figures in the history of Anglicanism. A disciple of John Wesley, Knox presents his mentor as a representative of the Neo-Platonic tradition within Anglicanism, a tradition that Knox himself also exemplifies. Knox also significantly impacted John Henry Newman and the Tractarians. But Alexander Knox is an important theologian in his own right, one who engaged substantially with the main intellectual currents of his day, namely those stemming from the Enlightenment and Romanticism. Meshing Knox’s theological teaching on various topics with details of his life, this book offers a fascinating portrait of a man who, in the words of Samuel Taylor Coleridge ‘changed the minds, and, with them, the acts of thousands.’
A Prolegomenon to the Study of Paul examines foundational assumptions that ground all interpretations of the apostle Paul. This examination touches on several topics, invoking issues pertaining to truth, hermeneutics, canonicity, historiography, pseudonymity, literary genres, and authority. Underlying all of this is a guiding thesis, namely, that every encounter with Paul involves “Pauline Archimedean points,” or fixed points of reference that establish the measure for constructing any interpretation of Paul whatsoever. Building on this, the author interrogates various issues that inform the formation of these Pauline Archimedean points, in pursuit of an important but modest goal: to urge Pauline readers to engage in a modicum of self-reflection over the various considerations that precondition all of our efforts to comprehend Paul.
From the Early British Apostolics to a Pentecostal Trinitarian Ecclesiology
In The Theosis of the Body of Christ: From the early British Apostolics to a Pentecostal Trinitarian Ecclesiology Jonathan Black builds on the ecclesiology of one of the UK’s original Pentecostal movements, the Apostolic Church, demonstrating the connection between ecclesiology and the Pentecostal distinctive of the baptism in the Holy Spirit. These early British Pentecostals were not naïve fundamentalists with the addition of a few Pentecostal distinctives, but rather engaged in significant theological reflexion, rooted in Trinitarian theology, resulting in a theology of theosis which resonates in many ways with the Great Tradition, yet is held together with a forensic/Reformation approach to justification. This approach then opens new possibilities in understanding the theological nature of the Pentecostal baptism in the Spirit.
The Textual History of the Bible (THB) brings together for the first time all available information regarding the manuscripts, textual history and character of each book of the Hebrew Bible and its translations as well as the deuterocanonical scriptures. In addition, THB covers the history of research, the editorial history of the Hebrew Bible, as well as other aspects of text-critical research and its subsidiary fields, such as papyrology, codicology, and the related discipline of linguistics. The THB will consist of 4 volumes.

Volume 2: Deuterocanonical Scriptures. Editors Matthias Henze and Frank Feder
Vol. 2A: overview articles
Vol. 2B: to Ezra
Vol. 2C: Jubilees to 16 Appendix
A Dialogue on the Shape of Waiting
Ephraim Radner, Hosean Wilderness, and the Church in the Post-Christendom West offers the first monograph-length treatment of the compelling and perplexing contemporary Anglican theologian Ephraim Radner. While unravelling his distinctive approach to biblical hermeneutics and ecclesiology, it queries the state of today's secularized church through a theological interpretation of an equally enigmatic writer: the prophet Hosea. It concludes that an eschatological posture of waiting and a heuristic of poesis should dictate the church's shape for an era in which God is stripping the church of its foregoing institutional forms.
The Metaphysics of Ibn al-ʿArabī in the Muqaddimat al-Qayṣarī
Editor: Mukhtar H. Ali
The Horizons of Being explores the teachings of Ibn al-ʿArabī by examining Dāwūd al-Qayṣarī’s (d. 1350) Prolegomena ( muqaddima) to his commentary, Maṭlaʿ khuṣūṣ al-kilam fī maʿānī Fuṣūṣ al-ḥikam (A Preamble of Select Discourse on the Meanings of the Fuṣūṣ al-ḥikam), referred to simply as Muqaddimat al-Qayṣarī. While his commentary represents the third in a direct line going back to Ibn al-ʿArabī through Kāshānī, Jandī and Qūnawī, it remains one of the most popular due to its thorough and accessible treatment of the Fuṣūṣ that frequently synthesizes the ideas of his predecessors.
The Muqaddima stands on its own as an independent work and has been the subject of careful study. If the al-Futūḥāt al-makkiyya contains the entirety of Ibn al-ʿArabī’s metaphysics which is distilled in the Fuṣūṣ, then Qayṣarī’s Muqaddima can be read not just as a precis of the Fuṣūṣ but a summary of Ibn al-ʿArabī’s doctrine.
Codices Sabaiticus 232 & Holy Cross 104, Jerusalem
New text of Origen’s come to light
Origen’s Commentary on Matthew is perhaps his latest work, and reference to this was never made by his detractors. Instead, like modern scholars, they always pointed the finger at a garbled, untrustworthy, and heavily interpolated edition of his De Principiis, in order to cheerfully show how much of a ‘heretic’ Origen was. While Erich Klostermann, in 1941, compiled a series of fragments after having consulted twenty-four codices, he missed Sabaiticus 232. Which, though it is the most important of all, because it contains not only ‘passages’ ,but also unique flowing text from that commentary, (as the author demonstrates) is pretty later than the Contra Celsum. Professor Panayiotis Tzamalikos demonstrates that unless the correlations of Origen’s work to both Greek philosophy and subsequent Patristic literature are perused, it is impossible to recognise the real Origen. Considering the widespread and multi-faced miscomprehension (ancient and modern alike) of Origen’s thought, Professor Tzamalikos, by means of his commentary on this Greek text, demonstrates that this is a terra still calling for informed and unbiased exploration.