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Traditional narratives hold that the art and architecture of the Iberian Peninsula in the late 15th century were transformed by the arrival of artists, objects, and ideas from northern Europe. The year 1492 has been interpreted as a radical rupture, marking the end of the Islamic presence on the peninsula, the beginning of global encounters, and the intensification of exchange between Iberia and Renaissance Italy.
This volume aims to nuance and challenge this narrative, considering the Spanish and Portuguese worlds in conjunction, and emphasising the multi-directional migrations of both objects and people to and from the peninsula. This long-marginalised region is recast as a ‘diffuse artistic centre’ in close contact with Europe and the wider world. The chapters interweave several media, geographies, and approaches to create a rich tapestry held together by itinerant artworks, artists and ideas.
Contributors are Luís Urbano Afonso, Sylvia Alvares-Correa, Vanessa Henriques Antunes, Piers Baker-Bates, Costanza Beltrami, António Candeias, Ana Cardoso, Maria L. Carvalho, Maria José Francisco, Bart Fransen, Alexandra Lauw, Marta Manso, Eva March, Encarna Montero Tortajada, Elena Paulino, Fernando António Baptista Pereira, Joana Balsa de Pinho, María Sanz Julián, Steven Saverwyns, Marco Silvestri, Maria Vittoria Spissu, Sara Valadas, Céline Ventura Teixeira, Nelleke de Vries, and Armelle Weitz.
This collection of essays explores the role of gardens in early modern academies and, conversely, the place of what might be called 'academic culture' in early modern gardens. While studies of botanical gardens have often focused on their association with a research institution, the intention of this book is deliberately broader, seeking to explore the interactions and intersections between the built environment of the early modern garden and the more or less organised social and intellectual life it supported. As such, the book contributes to the intersection of several fields of research: garden history, literary history, architectural history and socio-political history, and considers the garden as a site of performance that requires an intermedial approach.
A Heretical History of Architecture challenges the conventional understanding of significant developments in Western architecture as a series of alignments among dominant ideologies and artistic programs, arguing instead that the most consequential changes in the evolution of artistic and design practices across Europe between the fifth and seventeenth centuries were motivated by tensions between local religious or cultural traditions and centralized power.

This groundbreaking study richly demonstrates the processes through which heterodox beliefs that persisted within numerous diverse communities resulted in design experimentation so syncretic that it has heretofore eluded scholars employing conventional Euro-centric taxonomies of architectural styles.
Questions about space and the sacred are now central to Byzantine studies. Recent scholarship has addressed issues of embodiment and performance, power and identity, environmental perceptions and territorial imaginations. At the same time, the mobility turn in the humanities prompts new approaches to and understandings of processes of circulation of people, objects and ideas.
Drawing together illuminating contributions from scholars in history, art history, literature, geography, architecture and theology, Sacred Mobilities in Byzantium and Beyond sets the stage for further cross-disciplinary dialogue concerning Orthodox Christian spiritual culture and society in the Byzantine Empire and in the centuries after its fall.
Contributors are Veronica della Dora, Ekaterine Gedevanishvili, Molly Greene, Mark Guscin, Christos Antonios Kakalis, Chrysovalantis Kyriacou, Maria Litina, Andrew Louth, Mihail Mitrea, Bissera Pentcheva, Rehav Rubin, and David Williams.
Volume Editor:
Burial and Memorial explores funerary and commemorative archaeology, A.D. 284-650, across the late antique world, from Catalonia to Cappadocia. The first volume includes an overview of research, and papers exploring bioarchaeology, mortuary rituals, mausolea, and funerary landscapes. It considers the sacralisation of tombs, movements of relics, and the political significance of cemeteries. The fate of statue monuments is explored, as memorials for individuals. Authors also compare the spoliation or preservation of tombs to other buildings, and, finally, how the city itself, with its monuments, served as a place of collective memory, where meanings were long maintained.
The second volume includes papers exploring all aspects of funerary archaeology, from scientific samples in graves, to grave goods and tomb robbing and a bibliographic essay. It brings into focus neglected regions not usually considered by funerary archaeologists in NW Europe, such as the Levant, where burial archaeology is rich in grave good, to Sicily and Sardinia, where post-mortem offerings and burial manipulations are well-attested. We also hear from excavations in Britain, from Canterbury and London, and see astonishing fruits from the application of science to graves recently excavated in Trier.
[Ancient Architecture in Syria: Anderîn - Kerrātîn - Ma ͑râtā]
الأندرين – كراتين – معراتة هو جزء جديد من أجزاء العمارة القديمة في سوريا، تأليف هوارد باتلر وترجمة عائشة موسى. ويأخذنا هذا الجزء في جولة جديدة تطوف بنا بين كوكبةٍ من 42 موقعًا أثريًا لا تقل جمالًا عن سابقاتها، ويتميز كل منها بمعلمٍ أو أكثر حافظ على شكله بما يكفي ليميط اللثام عن فنٍ جديدٍ من فنون العمارات القديمة. فتارةً نجد كنيسة بازليكية وتارة تصادفنا ثكنات منيعة، وتارة أخرى تستقبلنا منازل وخزانات ومدافن وحمامات تبهرنا بجودة صقل حجارتها وتصاميم تيجانها وثراء نقوشها وفسيفسائها الخالدة ومداميكها المتناوبة بين البازلت والآجر.
إنها جولة لن تنسى في مدن أثرية كاملة تمتد جذورها في عمق التاريخ، تستحضر لنا صورة شاملة عن الفنون العمرانية لحضارات نهضت وازدهرت هنا، وخلّفت أوابد تعد منبع علمٍ تنهل منه الأجيال القادمة.

Il-Anderîn - Kerrātîn - Ma ͑râtā, written by Butler and translated by Aisha Moussa, is a new tour to 24 archaeological sites that are no less attractive than any other site in Syria. Each boasts one or more landmarks that are still well preserved to belong to the ancient architectural masterpieces in the region. The spectacular basilicas, fortified barracks, houses, reservoirs, tombs and baths all display stones highly finished, capitals well designed and richly carved, mosaics delicately patterned, and alternating bands of brickwork and basalt.
It is a tour to be remembered among archaeological cities of great antiquity, depicting the architecture of civilizations that rose and flourished here, then left behind ruins that became the knowledge resource for future generations.
Volume Editor:
Burial and Memorial explores funerary and commemorative archaeology, A.D. 284–650, across the late antique world. This first volume includes an overview of research, and papers exploring bioarchaeology, mortuary rituals, mausolea, and funerary landscapes. It considers the sacralisation of tombs, the movements of relics, and the political significance of cemeteries. The nature and fate of statue monuments is explored, as memorials to individuals. Authors also compare the destruction or preservation of tombs in relation to other buildings. Finally, the city itself is considered as a place of collective memory, where meanings were long maintained, via a study of spoliation.
Volume Editors: and
Burial and Memorial explores funerary and commemorative archaeology A.D. 284-650, by region. This second volume includes papers exploring all aspects of funerary archaeology, from scientific samples in graves, to grave goods and tomb robbing and a bibliographic essay. It brings into focus neglected regions not usually considered by funerary archaeologists in NW Europe, such as the Levant, where burial archaeology is rich in grave good, to Sicily and Sardinia, where post-mortem offerings and burial manipulations are well-attested. We also hear from excavations in Britain, from Canterbury and London, and see astonishing fruits from the application of science to graves recently excavated in Trier.