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Author: John G. Fitch
On Simples, a medicinal text of the first century A.D., is attributed in the manuscripts to the famous Dioscorides. In a remarkable piece of detective work, Professor Fitch establishes that its alphabetical sequences of medications, ignored by earlier scholars, are conclusive proof that the attribution cannot be correct. He also shows that these sequences provide evidence about the content of earlier, now lost, works, including perhaps the Rhizotomikon of Crateus. This is the first English translation of On Simples. With its exhaustive concordances and indices, it will make the work accessible to readers interested in ancient medicine, and will facilitate future research.
Healing Goddesses and the Legitimization of Professional asûs in the Mesopotamian Medical Marketplace
This volume exposes one of the world’s oldest medical marketplaces and the emergence of medical professionalization within it. Through an unprecedented analysis of the Mesopotamian healing goddesses as well as asûs, a diverse group of “healers”, Irene Sibbing-Plantholt demonstrates that from the Middle Babylonian period onwards, the goddess Gula was employed as a divine legitimization model for scholarly, professional asûs. With this work, Sibbing-Plantholt provides a unique insight in processes of medical competition and legitimization in ancient Mesopotamia, which speak to similar processes in other societies.
Tradition, Teaching, and Trials at Leiden University, 1575-1639
Author: Evan R. Ragland
How did medical students become Galenic physicians in the early modern era? Making Physicians guides the reader through the ancient sources, textbooks, lecture halls, gardens, dissecting rooms, and patient bedsides in the early decades of an important medical school. Standard pedagogy combined book learning and hands-on experience. Professors and students embraced Galen’s models for integrating reason and experience, cultivating humanist scholarship and argumentation, and also learning chymistry, medical botany, and clinical practice at patients’ bedsides, in private homes and in the city hospital. Following Galen’s emphasis on finding and treating the sick parts, professors correlated symptoms and the evidence from post-mortems to produce new pathological knowledge.
Editors: Gerrit Bos and Fabian Käs
Translator: Michael R. McVaugh
The medical compendium entitled Zād al-musāfir wa-qūt al-ḥāḍir ( Provisions for the Traveller and Nourishment for the Sedentary) and compiled by Ibn al-Jazzār from Qayrawān in the tenth century is one of the most influential handbooks in the history of western medicine. In the eleventh century, Constantine the African translated it into Latin; this translation was the basis for several commentaries compiled from the twelfth century on. The text was also translated into Byzantine Greek and three times into medieval Hebrew. The present volume includes a new critical edition of the Arabic text of books I and II, along with an annotated English translation, as well as critical editions of Constantine’s Viaticum and the Hebrew versions by Ibn Tibbon, Abraham ben Isaac, and Do’eg ha-Edomi.
When smallpox inoculation entered western medical practice in 1721 it aroused considerable controversy. A broad-based cohort of enlightened Germans such as publishers, poets, pastors and elite women attempted to dispel the doubts and encourage the innovative procedure. Yet many parents remained fearful, and the contagiousness of inoculation also necessitated a new approach. National pride in the past defeat of bubonic plague aroused optimism that smallpox could be banished using a similar strategy. The arrival in 1800 of Jenner’s vaccine ended the debates by offering yet another promising new approach.
Battling Smallpox before Vaccination explores the social and medical impacts of inoculation. It offers belated recognition for the valiant attempts of the many protagonists battling against the so-called ‘murdering angel’ before Edward Jenner’s discovery of vaccination. It provides a comprehensive description and penetrating analysis of the understanding and perception of smallpox, the propagation of pro-inoculation information, varied reactions to inoculation, and debates over the idealistic goal of eradicating smallpox.
Exploring People and Nature, 1700–1850
The book analyses from a comparative perspective the exploration of territories, the histories of their inhabitants, and local natural environments during the long eighteenth century. The eleven chapters look at European science at home and abroad as well as at global scientific practices and the involvement of a great variety of local actors in the processes of mapping and recording. Dealing with landlocked territories with no colonies (like Switzerland) and places embedded in colonial networks, the book reveals multifarious entanglements connecting these territories.

Contributors are: Sarah Baumgartner, Simona Boscani Leoni, Stefanie Gänger, Meike Knittel, Francesco Luzzini, Jon Mathieu, Barbara Orland, Irina Podgorny, Chetan Singh, and Martin Stuber.
Forgery and Early Modern Alchemy, Medicine and Natural Philosophy
Volume Editors: Didier Kahn and Hiro Hirai
The production of forgeries under the name of the Swiss physician Paracelsus (1493/94-1541) was an integral part of the diffusion of the Paracelsian movement in early modern Europe. Many of these texts were widely read and extremely influential. The inability of most readers of the time to distinguish the genuine from the fake amid the flood of publications contributed much to the emergence of Paracelsus’ legendary image as the patron of alchemy and occult philosophy. Innovative studies on largely overlooked aspects of Paracelsianism along with an extensive catalogue of Paracelsian forgeries make this volume an essential resource for future studies.

Contributors are Tobias Bulang, Dane T. Daniel, Charles D. Gunnoe, Jr., Hiro Hirai, Didier Kahn, Julian Paulus, Lawrence M. Principe, and Martin Žemla.

Originally published as Special Issue of the journal Early Science and Medicine, volume 24 (2019), no. 5-6 (published February 2020), with a revised Introduction and a new Appendix by Julian Paulus, entitled “A Catalogue Raisonné of Pseudo-Paracelsian Writings: Texts Attributed to Paracelsus and Paracelsian Writings of Doubtful Authenticity,” has been added.
Volume Editors: Gordon McOuat and Larry Stewart
Where did we do science in the Enlightenment and why? This volume brings together leading historians of Early Modern science to explore the places, spaces, and exchanges of Enlightenment knowledge production. Adding to our understanding of the “geographies of knowledge”, it examines the relationship between “space” and “place”, institutions, “objects”, and “ideas”, showing the ways in which the location of science really matters.

Contributors are Robert Iliffe, Victor Boantza, Margaret Carlyle, Jasmine Kilburn-Toppin, Trevor H. Levere, Alice Marples, Gordon McOuat, Larry Stewart, Marie Thébaud-Sorger, and Simon Werrett.