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Narratives of Non-normative Bodies and Minds
This volume calls for a Narratology of Diversity by investigating narratives of non-normative bodies and minds. It explores mental health representations in literature, including neurodiversity, the body-mind nexus, and embodied non-normativities, therein emphasizing the importance of understanding diverse psychological conditions as represented in narratives. The contributions include perspectives from a wide variety of scholars of European, North American, and comparative literature and culture.

While post-classical narratology has evolved through phases of diversification and consolidation, this volume represents innovation in understanding narrative development to embrace new areas of social awareness, including gendered narratologies (specifically feminist and queer narratologies) and post-colonial criticism, paving the way for a more inclusive narratology.
Series Editor:
We are living in turbulent times in which we need to face global challenges connecting fields and perspectives. Complex social issues require complex, multidisciplinary approaches to deal with their complexity. In recent decades, sociocybernetics has developed as a distinct discipline that aims to meet this challenge. Sociocybernetics is concerned with applying first and second order cybernetics, the systems sciences and complexity science in the social sciences. Brill Research Perspectives in Sociocybernetics and Complexity disseminates advances in sociocybernetics and consolidates existing research efforts, including theory and applications. Each installment addresses developments around a specific topic; thus, besides the audience interested in developments in sociocybernetics and the complexity sciences, each installment appeals to those in other disciplines who are engaged with a particular topic. The topics addressed range from foundational issues to applications in systems modelling, the arts, social interventions, environmental problems, social work and care, public policies, and urban design, on a local or global scale. Brill Research Perspectives in Sociocybernetics and Complexity is an invaluable resource for scholars, policymakers and practitioners wishing to learn about the latest developments in sociocybernetics, as well as a useful resource for teachers and those studying the social sciences and related disciplines.

Each installment is a focused monograph of approximately 30,000-40,000 words (70-100 pages) presenting the state of the art on a specific theme in close combination with critical analysis and research.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts by email to the publisher Jason Prevost. Please direct all other correspondence to Associate Editor Simona Casadio.
Critical Animal Studies investigates and challenges the complex dynamics of structural, institutional and discursive power formations that affect animals, humans, and the environment. By “critical” we mean that animal studies must not become a safe and sanitized discourse; it must use its unique and powerful perspective to advance a radical and oppositional dissent that engages and politicizes the many profound ethical, environmental, and social issues embedded in animal studies. With a critical orientation to the study of human-animal relationships, the series seeks to contribute to current debates and be a resource for social justice, animal advocacy and environmental movements and research as well as for humanities and social science scholars more generally. The series bridges boundaries between academic and activist knowledge development, between scholarship and citizenship, between theory and praxis, as well as between existing disciplines. We particularly invite texts that explore under researched areas such as animals and climate change, globalization, capital, colonialism, queer theory, education theory, childhood studies, labor issues, and disability studies. We welcome contributions from any discipline. For more information on Critical Animal Studies, please visit: http://www.criticalanimalstudies.org.

Possible book proposals may:
• Intervene in the animal economy of the production, science, service, experience, and culture industries;
• Critically analyze ideologies, practices and effects of the current animal welfare movements;
• Explore diverse forms and sites of human and animal resistance;
• Reappraise preexisting texts (such as Elaine Scarry’s The Body in Pain) by exploring new connects to the field of critical animal studies;
• Contribute to bold, innovative, and boundary shifting knowledge development in critical animal studies.

The series published an average of one volume per year over the last 5 years.
Series Editor:
In an age of numbers, intellectual and aesthetic partnerships between mathematicians and the contemporary arts, humanities, and entertainment worlds have become virtually routine. Movies, television shows, and websites built around, or involving, mathematics are now commonplace. Studies in Mathematics in the Arts and Humanities (MIAH) deals with all aspects of this partnership. The monographs and edited volumes of this book series explore all aspects of mathematics outside of mathematics itself, that is, as a cultural, aesthetic, and representational phenomenon. Each work examines some particular aspect, text, or event that falls under this rubric, from mathematics in natural phenomena (e.g., the Fibonacci Series), to math in myth and mysticism (e.g., the ancient Egyptian god Horus), in the arts (e.g., the golden ratio), and in pop fiction (e.g., movies, novels). The series presents mathematics as a cultural phenomenon, rather than as an abstract technical field.

Studies in Mathematics in the Arts and Humanities also explores such areas as the role of mathematics in new forms of art, such as digital art, and websites that present interesting facts about the interconnection between math and everyday life. These are discussed in terms of critical and genre theories that apply to any textual creation. The series is thus of interest to scholars and instructors involved in interdisciplinary work in which mathematics surfaces as an ancillary or thematic focus, including culture studies, literary criticism, anthropology, musicology, and art criticism. Furthermore, it is of interest and relevance to anyone who is interested in how mathematics is evolving in cultural spaces, new and old.

Studies in Mathematics in the Arts and Humanities is published in cooperation with The Fields Institute for Research in Mathematical Sciences.

Manuscripts should be at least 80,000 words in length (including footnotes and bibliography). Manuscripts may also include illustrations and other visual material. The editors welcome proposals for monographs written for academics and researchers in the field that are based on original scholarly research that makes a notable contribution to the subject. The series editors will also consider proposals for edited volumes that demonstrate strong thematic coherence and continuity among the contributions.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts by email to the publisher Jason Prevost. Please direct all other correspondence to Associate Editor Katie Short.

Authors will find general proposal guidelines at the Brill Author Gateway.
Series Editor:
The book presents the latest research and reflects on the relationships between the media and politics, using the case study method. It delves into the interests of Polish researchers from various centres. The individual chapters focus on different types of both old and new media, including the press, books, radio and the Internet. The authors are historians, media experts and political scientists, sociologists, cultural experts, linguists and representatives of other disciplines. As a result, the research methods, hypotheses and research results present a range of perspectives.
Author:
Did Adam have a navel? Did Adam and Eve have sex? Is God merely a fictional character, like Superman? Without thought experiments like these, the field of science and religion would be severely impoverished. Thought experiments are exercises of the imagination. Like in many other disciplines, the imagination has not received the attention it deserves in theology. This book argues that the imagination must be taken seriously as an engine for progress. It offers a theology of the imagination that is consistent with, and goes beyond, existing discussions about pluralism at the intersection of science and religion.
Author:
In the early twentieth century, the first large batch of Chinese civil engineers had graduated from the USA, and together with their American senior colleagues returned to China. They were enthusiastic about reconstructing the young republic by building new railways, highways, and canals, but what the engineers experienced in China, including mismanaged railways, useless highways, and silted canals, did not always meet their expectations and ideals. In this book, Thorben Pelzer makes the stories of these Chinese and American engineers come to life through exploring previously unpublished letters, rare images, maps, and a rich biographical dataset. He argues that the experiences of these engineers include a myriad of contradictions, disillusionment, and discontent, keeping the engineering profession in a constant flux of searching for its meaning and its place in Republican China.
Globalization is a defining characteristic of our contemporary world, with a reach and impact affecting all nations and peoples. Philosophical Aspects of Globalization is a collection of essays by leading contemporary Russian philosophers, scholars, and scientists concerned with addressing pressing issues of globalization from a philosophical point of view. The thirty-four authors who have contributed to this book represent a range of approaches and subfields of Global Studies in Russia, including topics such as theory of globalization, globalization and the environment, history and geopolitics, and globalization in cultural context. When compiled together in a single collection of essays, their work offers the English-speaking reader a comprehensive picture of new directions in Russian Global Studies in the twenty-first century, as well as demonstrates the importance of questions of globalization for philosophical inquiry in Russia today.
These essays draw on recent and versatile work by museum staff, science educators, and teachers, showing what can be done with historical scientific instruments or replicas. Varied audiences - with members just like you - can be made aware of exciting aspects of history, observation, problem-solving, restoration, and scientific understanding, by the projects outlined here by professional practitioners. These interdisciplinary case studies, ranging from the cinematic to the hands-on, show how inspiration concerning science and the past can give intellectual pleasure as well as authentic learning to new participants, who might include people like you: students, teachers, curators, and the interested and engaged public.

Contributors are Dominique Bernard, Paolo Brenni, Roland Carchon, Elizabeth Cavicchi, Stéphane Fischer, Peter Heering, J.W. Huisman, Françoise Khantine-Langlois, Alistair M. Kwan, Janet Laidla, Pierre Lauginie, Panagiotis Lazos, Pietro Milici, Flora Paparou, Frédérique Plantevin, Julie Priser, Alfonso San-Miguel, Danny Segers, Constantine (Kostas) Skordoulis, Trienke M. van der Spek, Constantina Stefanidou, and Giorgio Strano.