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Eine Archäologie der Gegenwartskunst
Author: Helmut Draxler
Das Buch rekonstruiert die historischen und symbolischen Voraussetzungen von Gegenwartskunst in der Niederländischen Malerei zwischen dem 15. und dem 17. Jahrhundert.
Hat Gegenwartskunst eine Geschichte? Diese Studie versucht, hinter die Begründungsmythen von Moderne und Gegenwartskunst als heroische Überwindungsleistungen alles Alten im Namen eines Neuen zu blicken. Eine Tradition des Gegenwartsbezugs von Kunst wird hierbei sichtbar, die tief in jener Geschichte verwurzelt ist, als die Malerei begann, um ihren Status als Kunst zu ringen. Die historischen Niederlande zwischen dem 15. und dem 17. Jahrhundert stellen den exemplarischen Schauplatz dieses Ringens dar. Durch den Verlust vorgegebener Wahrheiten und Funktionen entwickelt die Malerei – im Spannungsfeld zwischen ökonomischen, politischen und religiösen Krisen – Strategien der Selbstbehauptung als Kunst. Anhand besonderer Bildideen – dem Bild als Schwelle, dem antagonistischen, dem analytischen und dem synthetischen Bild – wird die Wirkmächtigkeit dieser Strategien nachvollzogen und so das Nachleben der Niederländischen Malerei als Gegenwartskunst erfasst.
Author: Noël Carroll
For over thirty years, Arthur Danto was the most important art critic and philosopher of art and aesthetics in the English-speaking world. Arthur Danto's Philosophy of Art: Essays provides a comprehensive and systematic view of his philosophy and criticism by Noël Carroll, Distinguished Professor of the Philosophy of Art, CUNY and himself a former journalist specializing in arts criticism. Danto's writings attracted and still attracts diverse audiences, including aestheticians, artists, art critics, historians, and art lovers. In this book they will find his major themes not only analyzed in depth but also discussions of his political significance, views on history, cinema and more.
This book provides philosophical insight into the nature of reality by reflecting on its ontological qualities through the medium of film. The main question thereby is whether we have access to reality through film that is not based on visual representation or narrations: Is film—in spite of its immateriality—a way to directly grasp and reproduce reality? Why do we perceive film as “real” at all? What does it mean to define its own reproducibility as an ontological feature of reality? And what does film as a medium exactly show? The contributions in this book provide, from a cinematic perspective, diverse philosophical analyses to the understanding of the challenging concept of “the real of reality”.
Abhinavagupta on Dance and Dramatic Acting
Author: Elisa Ganser
What is Dance? What is Theatre? What is the boundary between enacting a character and narrating a story? When does movement become tinted with meaning? And when does beauty shine alone as if with no object? These universal aesthetic questions find a theoretically vibrant and historically informed set of replies in the oeuvre of the eleventh-century Kashmirian author Abhinavagupta. The present book offers the first critical edition, translation, and study of a crucial and lesser known passage of his commentary on the Nāṭyaśāstra, the seminal work of Sanskrit dramaturgy. The nature of dramatic acting and the mimetic power of dance, emotions, and beauty all play a role in Abhinavagupta’s thorough investigation of performance aesthetics, now presented to the modern reader.
Jean-Baptiste Du Bos’ is one of the seminal works of modern aesthetics. Du Bos rejected the seventeenth-century view that works of art are assessed by reason. Instead, he believed, audience members have sentiments in response to artworks. Their sentiments are fainter versions of those they would feel in response to actually seeing what the work of art imitates. Du Bos was influenced by John Locke’s empiricism and, in turn, had a major impact on virtually every major eighteenth-century contributor to philosophy of art, including Voltaire, Montesquieu, Diderot, Rousseau, Herder, Lessing, Mendelssohn, Kames, Gerard, and Hume. This is the first modern, annotated and scholarly edition of the Critical Reflections in any language.
Volume Editors: Jacque Lynn Foltyn and Laura Petican
For the contributors to In Fashion: Culture, Commerce, Craft, and Identity being “in fashion” is about self-presentation; defining how fashion is presented in the visual, written, and performing arts; and about design, craft, manufacturing, packaging, marketing and archives. The book’s international cast of authors engage “in” fashion from various disciplinary, professional, and creative perspectives; i.e., anthropology, archaeology, art history, cultural studies, design, environmental studies, fashion studies, history, international relations, literature, marketing, philosophy, sociology, technology, and theatre.

In Fashion has five sections:
• Fashioning Representations: Texts, Images, and Performances;
• Fashionable: Shopping, Luxury, and Vintage;
• Fashion’s Materials: Craft, Industry, and Innovation;
• Museum Worthy: Fashion and the Archive;
• Fashioning Cultural Identities: Case Studies.
Over the last several decades an increasing number of people have studied film with a general interest in philosophy. Philos-sophia, the love of wisdom, is an attempt at interpreting or questioning human existence and the world in its entirety. Naturally film can be one of its subjects. In this series, philosophical writers account for their experience of specific films, directors, certain themes, or the phenomenon of film in general. Philosophy of film exceeds the schedule of mere interpretation and puts film in relationship with classical philosophical questions such as (its own) essence, truth, or beauty. Those reflections can also take the form of film aesthetics and film theory, which are philosophical inasmuch as their approaches are methodologically sophisticated and they transgress empiricism. Benefiting from the intellectual wealth of the entire history of the humanities, this series is an ideal source for anyone interested in the philosophical dimensions of cinema.

Book Proposals
Minimum length is 80 000 words main text. Please send a book proposal (ca. 1000 words) and a CV to thorstenbotz@hotmail.com. We will then say whether the project can be taken further. Monographs, edited volumes as well as "companions to" are welcome. Complete manuscripts will be double-blind peer reviewed.
Your MS should not be simultaneously submitted to another press.
Author: Gino Zaccaria
In this book, Gino Zaccaria offers a philosophical meditation on the issue of art in light of its originary sense. He shows how this sense can be fully understood provided that our thinking, on the one hand, returns to the ancient Greek world where it must heed the voice and hints of the goddess Athena, and, on the other hand, listens to “artist-thinkers” close to our current epoch, such as Cézanne, van Gogh and Boccioni. Indeed, the path of this meditation has as its guide the well-known sentence by the painter from Aix-en-Provence, which reads: “Je vous dois la vérité en peinture, et je vous la dirai !”. What will finally appear in this way will not be an abstract or historical notion of art, but its enigma; that is to say, the promise of “another initiation” of art itself.
Artful Works and Dialogue about Art as Experience
Volume Editors: Patricia L. Maarhuis and A.G. Rud
Imagining Dewey features productive (re)interpretations of 21st century experience using the lens of John Dewey’s Art as Experience, through the doubled task of putting an array of international philosophers, educators, and artists-researchers in transactional dialogue and on equal footing in an academic text. This book is a pragmatic attempt to encourage application of aesthetic learning and living, ekphrasic interpretation, critical art, and agonist pluralism.

There are two foci: (a) Deweyan philosophy and educational themes with (b) analysis and examples of how educators, artists, and researchers envision and enact artful meaning making. This structure meets the needs of university and high school audiences, who are accustomed to learning about challenging ideas through multimedia and aesthetic experience.

Contributors are: James M. Albrecht, Adam I. Attwood, John Baldacchino, Carolyn L. Berenato, M. Cristina Di Gregori, Holly Fairbank, Jim Garrison, Amanda Gulla, Bethany Henning, Jessica Heybach, David L. Hildebrand, Ellyn Lyle, Livio Mattarollo, Christy McConnell Moroye, María-Isabel Moreno-Montoro, María Martínez Morales, Stephen M. Noonan, Louise G. Phillips, Scott L. Pratt, Joaquin Roldan, Leopoldo Rueda, Tadd Ruetenik, Leísa Sasso, Bruce Uhrmacher, David Vessey, Ricardo Marín Viadel, Sean Wiebe, Li Xu and Martha Patricia Espíritu Zavalza.
Author: Gianmaria Ajani
The advent of Artificial Intelligence (AI) as an “autonomous author” urges the law to rethink authorship, originality, creativity. AI-generated artworks are in search of an author because current copyright laws offer as a solution only public domain or fragile regulatory mechanisms. During the 20th century visual artists have been posing persistent challenges to the law world: Conceptual Art favoured legal mechanisms alternative to copyright law. The case of AI-art is, however, different: for the first time the artworld is discovering the prospective of an art without human authors. Rather than preserving the status quo in the law world, policy makers should consider a reformative conception of AI in copyright law and take inspiration from innovative theories in the field of robot law, where new frames for a legal personhood of artificial agents are proposed. This would have a spill-over effect also on copyright regulations.