Browse results

Kleinste Zeiteinheit, Denkfigur, mediale Praxis
Der Band erforscht das Interventionspotential kleinster Zeiteinheiten und fragt, wie literarische, musikalische und künstlerische Momentaufnahmen und Augenblicksaufzeichnungen mit Konzepten einer sprunghaften und diskontinuierlichen Zeitwahrnehmung korrespondieren.
Diskontinuierliche und sequentielle temporäre Formen lagen lange im Streit mit der großen Form. Mittlerweile sind sie ein dominantes Muster der öffentlichen Kommunikation. Die Beiträge zeigen, inwiefern der aktuelle Erregungsdiskurs über die Tyrannei des Moments und den flüchtigen Augenblick einen historischen Index hat und immer von dem unterschwelligen Mitlaufen der Reflexion über Subjektivität begleitet ist. Es werden verschiedene Modi des sich Entziehens von Moment und Augenblick offengelegt und gezeigt, wie die Auseinandersetzungsgeschichte auf diese Unzugänglichkeit mit einem eigenen Bilddenken reagiert. Mit Beiträgen von Eva Axer, Ursula Geitner, Toni Hildebrandt, Thomas Macho u.a.
Vous ne lisez pas les notes en bas de page ? Vous avez tort. Rien de plus passionnant qu’une note infrapaginale, ou marginale, ou finale car il est vrai que nos dispositifs d’annotation sont divers. Souvent c’est la note qui contient l’essentiel. C’est alors par elle qu’il faut commencer. Nous distinguons entre le texte et le paratexte mais le paratexte est aussi une autre sorte de texte. Une « frange d’incertitude » (Genette) nous permet de passer d’un régime à l’autre. Les choses deviennent intéressantes à ce moment. Imaginez la note à la place du texte, le texte à la place de la note. Votre univers bascule, vous entrez dans un monde parallèle. La littérature est le lieu où la frontière entre le texte et les notes devient indécidable. Le présent volume passe en revue les pratiques d’annotation en contexte européen et ailleurs. Il offre au lecteur une riche série « d’études de cas » où le geste de l’annotateur est observé in actu. Parmi les auteurs étudiés : Balzac, Chateaubriand, Eliot, Mallarmé, Nabokov, Proust, Rimbaud, Oliver Rolin, et bien d’autres.

You don’t read footnotes? You are mistaken. There’s nothing more passionate than a footnote, a sidenote, or an endnote. The essential part of the message is the footnote. Narratologists distinguish between texte and paratexte, but the paratexte is just a different kind of texte. A frange d’incertitude (Genette) allows one to switch from one system to another. Imagine the note in the position of the text and the text in the position of the note. Your universe switches: you enter into a parallel world. Literature is the place where the border between the text and the notes becomes undecidable. The current volume reviews annotation practices in and outside of the European context. It offers a substantial series of “case studies” to the reader, where the actions of the annotateur are observed in actu. Among the studied authors: Balzac, Chateaubriand, Eliot, Mallarmé, Nabokov, Proust, Rimbaud, Oliver Rolin, and many others.

Avec des contributions de / With contributions from Anikó Ádám, Emmanuel Bouju, Maria de Jesus Cabral, Riccardo Campi, Ana Paula Coutinho, Andrea Del Lungo, Karen Haddad, Vincent Jouve, Fatima Outereirinhou, Claude Perez, Marika Piva, Nathalie Roelens, Franc Schuerewegen.
Volume I: Graeco-Syriaca and Arabica / Volume II: Islamic Philosophy / Volume III: From God´s Wisdom to Science: A. Islamic Theology and Sufism, B. History of Science / Volume IV: Islam, Europe and Beyond: A. Islam and the Middle Ages. B. Manuscripts, a B
Author: Hans Daiber
From the Greeks to the Arabs and Beyond written by Hans Daiber, is a six volume collection of Daiber’s scattered writings, journal articles, essays and encyclopaedia entries on Greek-Syriac-Arabic translations, Islamic theology and Sufism, the history of science, Islam in Europe, manuscripts and the history of oriental studies. The collection contains published (since 1967) and unpublished works in English, German, Arabic, Persian and Turkish, including editions of Arabic and Syriac texts. The publication mirrors the intercultural character of Islamic thought and sheds new light on many aspects ranging from the Greek pre-Socratics to the Malaysian philosopher Naquib al-Attas. A main concern is the interpretation of texts in print or in manuscripts, culminating in two catalogues (Vol. V and VI), which contain descriptions of newly discovered, mainly Arabic, manuscripts in all fields.
Vol. I: Graeco-Syriaca and Arabica.
Vol. II: Islamic Philosophy.
Vol. III: From God’s Wisdom to Science: A. Islamic Theology and Sufism; B. History of Science.
Vol. IV: Islam, Europe and Beyond: A. Islam and Middle Ages; B. Manuscripts – a Basis of Knowledge and Science; C. History of the Discipline; D. Obituaries; E. Indexes.
Vol. V: Unknown Arabic Manuscripts from Eight Centuries – Including one Hebrew and Two Ethiopian Manuscripts: Daiber Collection III.
Vol. VI: Arabic, Syriac, Persian and Latin Manuscripts on Philosophy, Theology, Science and Literature. Films and Offprints: Daiber Collection IV.
Metaphrasis: A Byzantine Concept of Rewriting and Its Hagiographical Products represents a first and authoritative discussion of rewriting in Byzantium. It brings together a rich variety of articles that treat the topic of hagiographical rewriting from various angles.The contributors discuss and comment on different kinds of texts in Greek and other languages, including Apophthegmata Patrum, Passions, Saints’ Lives, Enkomia, Miracle Collections, Synaxaria, and Menologia which date from late antiquity to late Byzantium. The volume offers a series of case studies examining how the same legends evolved through time by the process of rewriting. It is shown that the main driving force behind such rewriting was adaptation to different audiences and contexts. This work argues that rewriting is central to Christian cultures in the Middle Ages.

Contributors are Andria Andreou, Anne Alwis, Stavroula Constantinou, Koen de Temmerman, Kristoffel Demoen, Marina Detoraki, Bernard Flusin, Laura Franco, Martin Hinterberger, Christian Høgel, Daria D. Resh, Klazina Staat, Julie van Pelt, Robert Wiśniewski, and † John Wortley.
Picturing Death: 1200-1600 explores the visual culture of mortality over the course of four centuries that witnessed a remarkable flourishing of imagery focused on the themes of death, dying, and the afterlife. In doing so, this volume sheds light on issues that unite two periods—the Middle Ages and the Renaissance—that are often understood as diametrically opposed. The studies collected here cover a broad visual terrain, from tomb sculpture to painted altarpieces, from manuscripts to printed books, and from minute carved objects to large-scale architecture. Taken together, they present a picture of the ways that images have helped humans understand their own mortality, and have incorporated the deceased into the communities of the living.

Jessica Barker, Katherine Boivin, Peter Bovenmyer, Xavier Dectot, Maja Dujakovic, Brigit Ferguson, Alison C. Fleming, Fredrika Jacobs, Henrike C. Lange, Robert Marcoux, Walter S. Melion, Stephen Perkinson, Johanna Scheel, Mary Silcox, Judith Steinhoff, Noa Turel
In the past years, reflections on Jewish literatures and theoretical and methodological approaches discussed in Comparative Literature have converged. Places and Forms of Encounter in Jewish Literatures. Transfer, Mediality and Situativity brings together close readings and contextualizations of Jewish literatures with theories discussed in Comparative and World Literature Studies. The contributions are arranged in five chapters capturing central processes, actors and dynamics in the making of literatures, namely Literary Agents, Literary Figures, Writing Voids, Making of Literatures and Perceiving and Creating Languages. The volume seeks to illuminate the interrelations between literary systems, and to highlight Jewish literatures as a prism for encounters on the levels of text, discourse and culture, and their transformative force.
Studies in Communication on the Ancient Stage
This volume collects papers on pragmatic perspectives on ancient theatre. Scholars working on literature, linguistics, theatre will find interesting insights on verbal and non-verbal uses of language in ancient Greek and Roman Drama. Comedies and Tragedies spanning from 5th B.C.E. to 1st C.E. are investigated in terms of im/politeness, theory of mind, interpersonal pragmatics, body language, to name some of the approaches which afford new interpretations of difficult textual passages or shed new light into nuances of characterisation, or possibilities of performance. Words, silence, gestures, do things, all the more so in dramatic dialogues on stage.
Pictorial and Literary Transformations in Various Media, 1400-1800
This volume explores early modern recreations of myths from Ovid’s immensely popular Metamorphoses, focusing on the creative ingenium of artists and writers and on the peculiarities of the various media that were applied. The contributors try to tease out what (pictorial) devices, perspectives, and interpretative markers were used that do not occur in the original text of the Metamorphoses, what aspects were brought to the fore or emphasized, and how these are to be explained. Expounding the whatabouts of these differences, the contributors discuss the underlying literary and artistic problems, challenges, principles and techniques, the requirements of the various literary and artistic media, and the role of the cultural, ideological, religious, and gendered contexts in which these recreations were produced.

Contributors are: Noam Andrews, Claudia Cieri Via, Daniel Dornhofer, Leonie Drees-Drylie, Karl A.E. Enenkel, Daniel Fulco, Barbara Hrysko, Gerlinde Huber-Rebenich, Jan L. de Jong, Andrea Lozano-Vásquez, Sabine Lütkemeyer, Morgan J. Macey, Kerstin Maria Pahl, Susanne Scholz, Robert Seidel, and Patricia Zalamea.