Author: Florin Curta
In The Long Sixth Century in Eastern Europe, Florin Curta offers a social and economic history of East Central, South-Eastern and Eastern Europe during the 6th and 7th centuries. It challenges the current model of transition from Antiquity to the early Middle Ages on the basis of an interpretation of the written sources, but especially of an enormous amount of archaeological evidence accumulated in the last 50 years or so. It deals with societies in close contact with the Roman world, as well with those located very far from it. It addresses questions of property, subsistence, crafts, trade, and social change.
A Portrait of a Local Intermediary in Russian Central Asia
Author: Tetsu Akiyama
In The Qїrghїz Baatïr and the Russian Empire Tetsu Akiyama tells the story of Shabdan Jantay uulu (1839/40–1912), a local ruler from the northern Qїrghїz (Kirghiz, Kyrgyz) tribes. Akiyama explores Shabdan’s intermediary role in the Russian Empire’s military advance and rule in southern Semireche’e from the mid-nineteenth to the early twentieth century. Commonly portrayed as a faithful collaborator to Russia, he appears here as a flexible and tough intermediary who made strategic use of Russian dominance for his own ends. Based on a comprehensive study of primary sources, this interdisciplinary monograph dynamically reconstructs Shabdan’s biography, revealing the dilemmas faced by both Russian and Qїrghїz society, which were not only political, but also social, economic, and religious.
A Military History of Russia’s Move into the South Caucasus and the First Russo-Iranian War, 1801-1813
In From the Kur to the Aras George A. Bournoutian presents the first military history of the Russian advance into the South Caucasus in 1801 and the ensuing First Russo-Iran War (1804-1813) that was a crucial step in the Russian Empire’s eventual expansion into the Caucasus region. Using both Iranian and Russian primary sources, the work vividly describes the strategies, military capabilities and personalities that clashed for ten years, ending with the Treaty of Golestan. Numerous and illustrative maps, as well as informative appendices, add to a balanced view of a struggle between and ancient and an emerging empire.
The Image of a Ruler in the Latin Text of The Chronicle of the Priest of Duklja
The Chronicle of the Priest of Duklja is considered to be among the most important and mysterious narrative sources discussing the Slavic presence on the Adriatic coast and its hinterland. It is also one of the most controversial. This detailed study examines the Latin version of the chronicle, and it explores the deeper meanings hidden behind the history of the contrived monarchy, acknowledging the tradition regarding the fate of its leading rulers. The work focuses on four representatives of the royal family, rulers during key periods in the narrative. Each of the kings presented a different pattern of rule, and each of them, in his own way, established new rules for the functioning of the Kingdom of the Slavs.
Essays in Honor of Donald D. Horward. (Revised and Extended Edition)
Volume Editor: Michael V. Leggiere
In this revised and extended edition of Napoleon and the Operational Art of War, the leading scholars of Napoleonic military history provide the most authoritative analysis of Napoleon’s battlefield success and ultimate failure. Napoleon’s development and mastery of the operational art of warfare is revealed as each chapter analyzes one Napoleonic war or major campaign of a war. To achieve this, the essays conform to the common themes of Napoleon’s planning, his command and control, his execution of plans, and the response of his adversaries. Napoleon's sea power and the British response to the French challenge at sea is also investigated. Overall, this volume reflects the finest scholarship and cutting-edge research to be found in Napoleonic military history.
Contributors include Jonathan Abel, Robert M. Citino, Phillip R. Cuccia, Huw J. Davies, Mark T. Gerges; John H. Gill; Jordan R. Hayworth, Kenneth G. Johnson, Michael V. Leggiere, Kevin D. McCranie, Alexander Mikaberidze, Frederick C. Schneid, John Severn, Dennis Showalter, Geoffrey Wawro, and John F. Weinzierl.
How and when a west Slavic principality centred on Nitra originated in the middle Danube is a key question of medieval East Central Europe. In this book, Ján Steinhübel reconstructs the origins, history and expansion of this Nitrian Principality. Based on contemporary sources and extensive historical and archaeological literature, he traces the development of the land for 640 years (470-1110). The book illuminates Nitrian development since the decline of the Avars, its short period of independence in 9th century and later its incorporation to Great Moravia and Hungary respectively. It argues that Nitrian Principality laid the national, territorial and historical foundations of Slovakia.
In “The Turk” in the Czech Imagination (1870s-1923), Jitka Malečková describes Czechs’ views of the Turks in the last half century of the existence of the Ottoman Empire and how they were influenced by ideas and trends in other countries, including the European fascination with the Orient, images of “the Turk,” contemporary scholarship, and racial theories. The Czechs were not free from colonial ambitions either, as their attitude to Bosnia-Herzegovina demonstrates, but their viewpoint was different from that found in imperial states and among the peoples who had experienced Ottoman rule. The book convincingly shows that the Czechs mainly viewed the Turks through the lenses of nationalism and Pan-Slavism – in solidarity with the Slavs fighting against Ottoman rule.
Author: Daniela Tănase
In Craftsmen and Jewelers in the Middle and Lower Danube Region (6th to 7th Centuries) Daniela Tănase examines the practice of metalworking with the aim of comparing the archaeological evidence of different peoples in the Middle and Lower Danube in the Early Middle Ages, with a particular focus on blacksmithing, goldsmithing and burial customs. Evidence suggests that the distinction between these specialties was quite fluid, so blacksmiths could craft jewelery, while jewelers were able to create tools and weapons. The study also reveals how the production process and the main techniques employed by craftsmen for the ornamentation of dress and accessories were subject to multiple influences, from Byzantium, the eastern steppe, and the Merovingian kingdoms.
Established in 2010 to meet a growing international interest in Balkan studies, the Balkan Studies Library series publishes high-quality disciplinary and interdisciplinary research on all aspects of the Balkans with a focus on history, politics and culture. The region is defined here as comprising Greece, Albania, Bulgaria, Romania, Turkey and the countries of former Yugoslavia, including their imperial Ottoman and Habsburg heritage.

The series publishes monographs, collective volumes, and editions of source materials. Disciplines covered include history, anthropology, archaeology, political science, sociology, legal studies, economy, religion, literary studies, cultural studies, gender studies, film, theatre and media studies, art history, language and linguistics. The editors especially welcome comparative studies, be they comparisons between individual Balkan countries, or of (parts of) the region with other countries and regions. All submissions are subject to anonymous peer review by leading specialists.

Until Volume 27, the series was published by Brill, click here.
The series does not publish conference proceedings.
Volume Editor: Gábor Kármán
Tributaries and Peripheries of the Ottoman Empire offers thirteen studies on the relationship between Ottoman tributaries with each other in the imperial framework, as well as with neighboring border provinces of the empire’s core territories from the fifteenth to the eighteenth centuries. A variety of surveys related to the Cossack Ukraine, the Crimean Khanate, Dagestan, Moldavia, Ragusa, Transylvania, Upper Hungary and Wallachia allow the reader to see hitherto less known subtleties of the Ottoman administration’s hierarchic structures and the liberties and restrictions of the office-holders’ power. They also shed light upon the strategies of coalition-building among the elites of the tributaries as well as the core provinces of the border zones, which determined their cooperation, but also the competition between them.

Contributors include: János B. Szabó, Ovidiu Cristea, Tetiana Grygorieva, Klára Jakó, Gábor Kármán, Dariusz Kołodziejczyk, Natalia Królikowska-Jedlińska, Erica Mezzoli, Viorel Panaite, Radu G. Păun, Ruža Radoš Ćurić, Balázs Sudár, Michał Wasiucionek.