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Editor: Suad Joseph
A unique collaboration of nearly 300 scholars worldwide, the Encyclopedia of Women & Islamic Cultures 2010-2020 is an interdisciplinary, trans-historical, and global project. The 9 volumes represent cutting-edge research on gender studies and the Islamic world. The EWIC 2010-2020 consist of all new entries on ground-breaking contemporary research topics, such as social media, security regimes, cinema, diaspora studies, Hip-Hop & Rap, Queer movements, Islamophobia and masculinity. The Encyclopedia of Women & Islamic Cultures is an essential reference work for gender studies, Middle Eastern and Islamic studies, as well as religion, history, politics, anthropology, geography and related disciplines.
All articles published in the EWIC 2010-2020 have been published previously as part of EWIC Online (brill.com/ewio).
EWIC 2010-2020 collects all the articles from ten years of EWIC Online, into a nine-volume set – eight volumes of articles and one volume for the collective index. Four of the volumes will be published in 2020 and five in 2021. EWIC 2010-2020 offers 289 articles, written by 292 authors, covering 126 topics. Cumulatively, this is nearly two million words.
Senior scholars of Islamic studies and the anthropology of Islam gather in this volume to pay tribute to one of the giants of the field, Dale F. Eickelman. In diversely arrayed, rigorous and compelling chapters, leading historians, anthropologists, and political scientists elaborate through their own original research on Dale’s unique contributions to the study of the modern Muslim world. Eickelman’s reflections on the diverse intellectual traditions of Muslim societies and the scholars and laypersons who enact them remain defining as a framework for intellectual inquiry into the modern Muslim world and the profound changes that are transpiring within it.

Contributors are Jon W. Anderson, el-Sayed el-Aswad, Simeon Evstatiev, Allen James Fromherz, Harvey E. Goldberg, Gilles Kepel, Mandana Limbert, Simon O’Meara, Abdelrhani Moundib, Muhammad Khalid Masud, Nadav Samin, Susan Slyomovics, Jenny White and Muhammad Qasim Zaman.
Editor: Suad Joseph
A unique collaboration of nearly 300 scholars worldwide, the Encyclopedia of Women & Islamic Cultures 2010-2020 is an interdisciplinary, trans-historical, and global project. The 9 volumes represent cutting-edge research on gender studies and the Islamic world. The EWIC 2010-2020 consist of all new entries on ground-breaking contemporary research topics, such as social media, security regimes, cinema, diaspora studies, Hip-Hop & Rap, Queer movements, Islamophobia and masculinity. The Encyclopedia of Women & Islamic Cultures is an essential reference work for gender studies, Middle Eastern and Islamic studies, as well as religion, history, politics, anthropology, geography and related disciplines.
All articles published in the EWIC 2010-2020 have been published previously as part of EWIC Online (brill.com/ewio).
EWIC 2010-2020 collects all the articles from ten years of EWIC Online, into a nine-volume set – eight volumes of articles and one volume for the collective index. Four of the volumes will be published in 2020 and five in 2021. EWIC 2010-2020 offers 289 articles, written by 292 authors, covering 126 topics. Cumulatively, this is nearly two million words.
In Intercultural Friendship: The Case of a Palestinian Bedouin and a Dutch Israeli Jew Daniel J.N. Weishut focuses on the interface between interculturality and friendship in the context of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. After a literature study, the author describes the socio-cultural context of his boundary-crossing friendship in the realm of the Israeli occupation and then investigates it through the perspective of Hofstede’s cultural dimensions. The tremendous cultural differences as they appear are in line with Hofstede's theory for three of the value orientations but in the field of “uncertainty avoidance” they conflict with the theory. Challenges and opportunities in the friendship, and their implications for personal growth, among others, are illustrated by a series of intriguing stories of friendship.
From Volume 7 onwards, new format with a more current and topical focus on a country level.

The Yearbook of Muslims in Europe is an essential resource for analysis of Europe's dynamic Muslim populations. Featuring up-to-date research from forty-three European countries, this comprehensive reference work summarizes significant activities, trends, and developments.

Each new volume reports on the most current information available from surveyed countries, offering an annual overview of statistical and demographic data, topical issues of public debate, shifting transnational networks, change to domestic and legal policies, and major activities in Muslim organisations and institutions. Supplementary data is gathered from a variety of sources and evaluated according to its reliability.

In addition to offering a relevant framework for original research, the Yearbook of Muslims in Europe provides an invaluable source of reference for government and NGO officials, journalists, policy-makers, and related research institutions.
Editor: Suad Joseph
A unique collaboration of nearly 300 scholars worldwide, the Encyclopedia of Women & Islamic Cultures 2010-2020 is an interdisciplinary, trans-historical, and global project. The 9 volumes represent cutting-edge research on gender studies and the Islamic world. The EWIC 2010-2020 consist of all new entries on ground-breaking contemporary research topics, such as social media, security regimes, cinema, diaspora studies, Hip-Hop & Rap, Queer movements, Islamophobia and masculinity. The Encyclopedia of Women & Islamic Cultures is an essential reference work for gender studies, Middle Eastern and Islamic studies, as well as religion, history, politics, anthropology, geography and related disciplines.
All articles published in the EWIC 2010-2020 have been published previously as part of EWIC Online (brill.com/ewio).
EWIC 2010-2020 collects all the articles from ten years of EWIC Online, into a nine-volume set – eight volumes of articles and one volume for the collective index. Four of the volumes will be published in 2020 and five in 2021. EWIC 2010-2020 offers 289 articles, written by 292 authors, covering 126 topics. Cumulatively, this is nearly two million words.
Editor: Suad Joseph
A unique collaboration of nearly 300 scholars worldwide, the Encyclopedia of Women & Islamic Cultures 2010-2020 is an interdisciplinary, trans-historical, and global project. The 9 volumes represent cutting-edge research on gender studies and the Islamic world. The EWIC 2010-2020 consist of all new entries on ground-breaking contemporary research topics, such as social media, security regimes, cinema, diaspora studies, Hip-Hop & Rap, Queer movements, Islamophobia and masculinity. The Encyclopedia of Women & Islamic Cultures is an essential reference work for gender studies, Middle Eastern and Islamic studies, as well as religion, history, politics, anthropology, geography and related disciplines.
All articles published in the EWIC 2010-2020 have been published previously as part of EWIC Online (brill.com/ewio).
EWIC 2010-2020 collects all the articles from ten years of EWIC Online, into a nine-volume set – eight volumes of articles and one volume for the collective index. Four of the volumes will be published in 2020 and five in 2021. EWIC 2010-2020 offers 289 articles, written by 292 authors, covering 126 topics. Cumulatively, this is nearly two million words.
Money, Pride, and Soul-Searching
Author: Yuting Wang
Chinese in Dubai offers the first book-length study of the experiences of overseas Chinese living in the most prominent global city in the Arabian Gulf and the broader Middle East region. Evolving around three themes—money, pride, and spirituality, this book delineates the changing shape of Chinese spaces in metropolitan Dubai, explicates how a frontier mentality affects intergroup relations, identity construction, and religious experiences in the Chinese diaspora. It documents how the Chinese make sense of their struggles, sufferings, prosperity, and success in relation to Dubai’s fast changing social environment. This book is a timely endeavour to gauge the implications of a rising China and the shifting patterns of the international economic and political order for the global Chinese diaspora.
Editor: Suad Joseph
A unique collaboration of nearly 300 scholars worldwide, the Encyclopedia of Women & Islamic Cultures 2010-2020 is an interdisciplinary, trans-historical, and global project. The 9 volumes represent cutting-edge research on gender studies and the Islamic world. The EWIC 2010-2020 consist of all new entries on ground-breaking contemporary research topics, such as social media, security regimes, cinema, diaspora studies, Hip-Hop & Rap, Queer movements, Islamophobia and masculinity. The Encyclopedia of Women & Islamic Cultures is an essential reference work for gender studies, Middle Eastern and Islamic studies, as well as religion, history, politics, anthropology, geography and related disciplines.
All articles published in the EWIC 2010-2020 have been published previously as part of EWIC Online (brill.com/ewio).
EWIC 2010-2020 collects all the articles from ten years of EWIC Online, into a nine-volume set – eight volumes of articles and one volume for the collective index. Four of the volumes will be published in 2020 and five in 2021. EWIC 2010-2020 offers 289 articles, written by 292 authors, covering 126 topics. Cumulatively, this is nearly two million words.
Between Churchification and Securitization
In Islam in Post-communist Eastern Europe: Between Churchification and Securitization Egdūnas Račius reveals how not only the governance of religions but also practical politics in post-communist Eastern Europe are permeated by the strategies of churchification and securitization of Islam. Though most Muslims and the majority of researchers of Islam hold to the view that there may not be church in Islam, material evidence suggests that the representative Muslim religious organizations in many Eastern European countries have been effectively turned into ecclesiastical-bureaucratic institutions akin to nothing less than ‘national Muslim Churches’. As such, these ‘national Muslim Churches’ themselves take an active part in securitization, advanced by both non-Muslim political and social actors, of certain forms of Islamic religiosity.