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This volume describes the procedures governing the transfer of sentenced foreign nationals from the United States to serve the remainder of their sentences in their native countries, and of United States nationals sentenced in foreign countries to serve the remainder of their sentences in the United States. It discusses the statutory and treaty framework regulating the transfer of sentenced persons to and from the United States, as well as the case law interpreting those statutes and treaties. Appendices contain United States statutes and regulations, U.S. Department of Justice Manual materials, and all treaties governing the transfer of prisoners to and from the United States.
Author: Huw Llewellyn
Huw Llewellyn offers a comparative institutional analysis of the five United Nations criminal tribunals (for the former Yugoslavia, Rwanda, Sierra Leone, Cambodia and Lebanon), assessing the strengths and weaknesses of their institutional forms in supporting the governance, independence and impartiality of these pioneering criminal justice bodies.

Largely overlooked in the otherwise comprehensive literature on international criminal justice, this book focuses on “parenthood”, “oversight” and “ownership” by the tribunals’ governing bodies, concepts unnecessary in national jurisdictions, and traces the tension between governance and judicial independence through the different phases of the tribunals’ lifecycles: from their establishment to commencement of operations, completion of mandates and closure, and finally to the “afterlife” of their residual phase.
This is the first English written book that includes the most significant opinions of Judge Paulo Pinto de Albuquerque delivered at the European Court of Human Rights. He was the President of the Committee on the Rules of the Court, the President of the Criminal Law Group of the Court and the focal point for the international relations of the European Court with Constitutional and Supreme Courts outside Europe. Previously he had worked as an anti-corruption leading expert for the Council of Europe.
As Full Professor at the Faculty of Law of the Catholic University of Lisbon, he has published, inter alia, 23 books in English, French, Italian, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Turkish and Ukranian and 65 legal articles and book chapters in those languages as well as Chinese and German. Since his appointment as a Judge in Strasbourg, he has authored 157 opinions that have significantly contributed to the development of international human rights law. The Judge’s decisions are regularly cited by academic scholars and practitioners in human rights law, public international law, criminal law, migration and refugee law.
Editor: James C. Simeon
Terrorism and Asylum, edited by James C. Simeon, explores terrorism and asylum in all its interrelated and variable aspects, and permutations. The critical role terrorism plays as a driver in forced displacement, within the context of protracted armed conflict and extreme political violence, is analyzed. Exclusion from refugee protection for the alleged commission of terrorist activities is thoroughly interrogated. Populist politicians’ blatant use of the “fear of terrorism” to further their public policy security agenda and to limit access to refugee protection is scrutinized. The principal issues and concerns regarding terrorism and asylum and how these might be addressed, in the public interest while, at the same time, protecting and advancing the human rights and dignity of everyone are offered.

See inside the book.
Reviewing Grounds for Refusal from the Classic Paradigm to Mutual Recognition and Beyond
In Extradition Law, Miguel João Costa offers not only an exhaustive review of this legal area and of transnational criminal law more generally, but also innovative solutions for their reform.
The book critically analyses numerous themes – from international cooperation in criminal matters to substantive criminal law and procedure, from human rights to nationality and refugee law, from public to private international law – at the national, European and global levels. Moreover, while it is a fundamentally normative study, it does not disregard the political and diplomatic dimensions of extradition either.
The result is a new model based on mutual respect, enabling States to increase cooporation whilst preserving the integrity of their own criminal justice values and enhancing the respect for human rights.
Author: Drazan Djukić
In The Right to Appeal in International Criminal Law Dražan Djukić describes appeal proceedings in international criminal law and evaluates them against human rights benchmarks. While international criminal courts and tribunals mainly comply with these benchmarks, they have fallen short in certain important areas.
Despite their importance to the legal process, appeal proceedings tend to receive limited attention. On the basis of benchmarks arising from international human rights law, Dražan Djukić systematically assesses the law and practice concerning appeal proceedings in international criminal law.
EU criminal justice is a fast developing and challenging area of EU law and policy that requires scholars from different disciplines to join forces. This book is a first attempt to establish such synergies. Coming from different angles, the authors deal with questions in the area of EU substantive criminal law, such as when criminalisation of conduct is an appropriate choice; how the process of (de)criminalisation could be advanced; what the role of evidence could be in this regard; and what consequences criminalisation decisions at EU level have for national legal orders. The book concludes with a demonstration of how similar issues arise in the field of procedural criminal law.
Editor: Pavel Šturma
The Rome Statute of the ICC at its Twentieth Anniversary (Achievements and Perspectives) is an edited book comprising of 13 chapters written by contributors to a conference dedicated to discuss the development, achievements and possible future evolution of the Rome Statute and international criminal law. The authors include academics from various legal systems, practitioners from the ICC and the Special Tribunal for Lebanon, attorneys and other law experts.

The International Criminal Court is the first universal international criminal tribunal. Though quite new, as the Rome Statute was adopted 20 years ago (1998) and only 16 years have passed since its entry into force, it has already developed interesting case-law and continues to elaborate on both substantive and procedural international criminal law.

Contributors are Ivana Hrdličková, Claus Kreß, Tamás Lattmann, Jan Lhotský, Milan Lipovský, Iryna Marchuk, Josef Mrázek, Anna Richterová, Simon De Smet, Ondřej Svaček, Pavel Šturma, Kateřina Uhlířová, Kristýna Urbanová, Aloka Wanigasuriya.
In The Right to Be Present at Trial in International Criminal Law Caleb H. Wheeler analyses what it means for the accused to be present during international criminal trials and how that meaning has changed. This book also examines the impact that absence from trial can have on the fair trial rights of the accused and whether those rights can be upheld outside of the accused’s presence. Using primary and secondary sources, Caleb Wheeler has identified four different categories of absence and how each affects the right to be present. This permits a more nuanced understanding of how the right to be present is understood in international criminal law and how it may develop in the future.
International law and the Hague, the city where so many institutions of international law are established, are intimately connected. This book presents the views developed by some of the active players in the legal capital of the world on a number of the current challenges faced by international law. The starting point was a seminar held in the Peace Palace, reviewing some of the legal policy questions of today, such as the acceptance of the jurisdiction of the ICJ as a prerequisite to dispute settlement. Supplementing these articles on classical international law are essays dealing with the younger discipline of international criminal law, as practiced by the ICC and other Tribunals, offering ideas on, among other things. how to speed up the lengthy procedures of international criminal tribunals. Other contributions debate the universality of human rights and their legal protection.