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A Complete English Translation
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The Eight Books: A Complete English Translation is the first complete translation of the collected poems of Sohrab Sepehri (1928-1980), a major Iranian modernist poet and painter and yet under-translated into English. The introduction takes up Sepehri's famously difficult if languidly beautiful style to explain it as a series of appropriations of global modernisms in poetry and painting. It offers close readings of how Sepehri's modernism follows and breaks with the jagged rhythms of Nima Yushij (d.1960), Iran's inaugural modernist poet. In keeping with this modernist framing, the translations replicate Sepehri's rhymes where possible, his fluctuations between formal and colloquial registers, his syntactic distortions, and his embeddings of governmental and other jargons. It also includes Sepehri's autobiography.
The Turkish Novel and the Quest for Rationality is the first book to contextualize the Turkish novel with regard to the intellectual developments motivating the Turkish modernization project since the 18th century. The book provides a dialectical narrative for the emergence and development of the Turkish novel in order to highlight the genre’s critical role within the modernization project. In doing so, it also delineates the changing forms the novel assumes in the Turkish context from a platform for new literature to a manifestation of crisis in the face of totalizing rationality. Vis-a-vis modernization's engagement with rationality, The Turkish Novel and the Quest for Rationality reveals unexplored ways of conceptualizing the development of the genre in non-western contexts.
The present English translation reproduces the original German of Carl Brockelmann’s Geschichte der Arabischen Litteratur (GAL) as accurately as possible. In the interest of user-friendliness the following emendations have been made in the translation: Personal names are written out in full, except b. for ibn; Brockelmann’s transliteration of Arabic has been adapted to comply with modern standards for English-language publications; modern English equivalents are given for place names, e.g. Damascus, Cairo, Jerusalem, etc.; several erroneous dates have been corrected, and the page references to the two German editions have been retained in the margin, except in the Supplement volumes, where new references to the first two English volumes have been inserted.

Supplement volume SIII-ii offers the thee Indices (authors, titles, and Western editors/publishers).
The present English translation reproduces the original German of Carl Brockelmann’s Geschichte der Arabischen Litteratur (GAL) as accurately as possible. In the interest of user-friendliness the following emendations have been made in the translation: Personal names are written out in full, except b. for ibn; Brockelmann’s transliteration of Arabic has been adapted to comply with modern standards for English-language publications; modern English equivalents are given for place names, e.g. Damascus, Cairo, Jerusalem, etc.; several erroneous dates have been corrected, and the page references to the two German editions have been retained in the margin, except in the Supplement volumes, where new references to the first two English volumes have been inserted.

Supplement volume SIII-ii offers the thee Indices (authors, titles, and Western editors/publishers).
The present English translation reproduces the original German of Carl Brockelmann’s Geschichte der Arabischen Litteratur (GAL) as accurately as possible. In the interest of user-friendliness the following emendations have been made in the translation: Personal names are written out in full, except b. for ibn; Brockelmann’s transliteration of Arabic has been adapted to comply with modern standards for English-language publications; modern English equivalents are given for place names, e.g. Damascus, Cairo, Jerusalem, etc.; several erroneous dates have been corrected, and the page references to the two German editions have been retained in the margin, except in the Supplement volumes, where new references to the first two English volumes have been inserted.
In Ibāḍī Texts from the 2nd/8th Century Abdulrahman Al-Salimi and Wilferd Madelung present an edition of fourteen Ibāḍī religious texts and explain their contents and extraordinary source value for the early history of Islam. The Ibāḍīs constitutes the moderate wing of the Kharijite opposition movement to the Umayyad and ‘Abbasid caliphates. The texts edited are mostly polemical letters to opponents or exhortatory to followers by ‘Abd Allah b. Ibad , Abu l-‘Ubayda Muslim b. Abi Karima and other Ibadi leaders in Basra, Oman and Hadramawt. An epistle detailing the offences of the caliph ‘Uthman is by the early Kufan historiographer al-Haytham b. ‘Adi. By their early date and independence of the mainstream historical tradition these txts offer the modern historian of Islam an invaluable complement to the well-known literary sources.
The present English translation reproduces the original German of Carl Brockelmann’s Geschichte der Arabischen Litteratur (GAL) as accurately as possible. In the interest of user-friendliness the following emendations have been made in the translation: Personal names are written out in full, except b. for ibn; Brockelmann’s transliteration of Arabic has been adapted to comply with modern standards for English-language publications; modern English equivalents are given for place names, e.g. Damascus, Cairo, Jerusalem, etc.; several erroneous dates have been corrected, and the page references to the two German editions have been retained in the margin, except in the Supplement volumes, where new references to the first two English volumes have been inserted.
Translator:
The present English translation reproduces the original German of Carl Brockelmann’s Geschichte der Arabischen Litteratur (GAL) as accurately as possible. In the interest of user-friendliness the following emendations have been made in the translation: Personal names are written out in full, except b. for ibn; Brockelmann’s transliteration of Arabic has been adapted to comply with modern standards for English-language publications; modern English equivalents are given for place names, e.g. Damascus, Cairo, Jerusalem, etc.; several erroneous dates have been corrected, and the page references to the two German editions have been retained in the margin, except in the Supplement volumes, where new references to the first two English volumes have been inserted.
Author:
Wissensvermittlung im Gespräch ist die erste Monographie über die Verwendung der Dialogform in der arabischen Literatur. Regula Forster untersucht dazu ein umfangreiches Korpus klassisch-arabischer Dialoge ganz unterschiedlichen Inhalts (Religion, Jurisprudenz, Alchemie, Geschichte etc.) aus der Zeit zwischen dem 8. und der Mitte des 11. Jahrhunderts. Sie zeigt auf, dass arabische Dialoge nicht einfach als dialogisierte Abhandlungen zu verstehen sind. Vielmehr erschaffen Dialoge eigene literarische Universen, indem sie Figuren in Zeit und Raum agieren lassen und spezifische Formen der Argumentation und Textstrukturierung verwenden. Durch die spezifische literarische Form des wissensvermittelnden Dialogs wird auch der Inhalt der Texte gelenkt.

This is the first book-length study about the usage of the form of literary dialogue in Arabic literature. Regula Forster studies an extensive corpus of Classical Arabic didactic dialogues on very different subjects (religion, jurisprudence, alchemy, history, etc.) from the 8th to the mid-11th centuries.
She shows that Arabic dialogues are by no means dialogised treatises. Rather, they create a literary universe of their own. In this universe, figures are shown to be acting and speaking in time and space. Therefore, the dialogues use specific forms of argumentation and structuring. Through the use of the literary form of dialogue the content of these texts is shaped and the knowledge presented channelled.

Volume Editor:
Urdu and Indo-Persian Thought, Poetics, and Belles Lettres, is a collection on the subject of Urdu poetics, Dastan, translation studies in Urdu, and Indo-Persian. The essays employ interdisciplinary perspectives for exploring the dynamic literary landscape of the South Asian subcontinent since the sixteenth century.
The individual topics in the collection depict a plausible picture of how the development of Urdu and Indo-Persian thoughts and poetics have influenced one another for centuries.
Contributors are: Satya Hedge, Prashant Keshavmurthy, Pasha M. Khan, Mehr Afshan Faruqi, David Lelyveld, Natalia Prigarina, Carla Petievich, Christina Oesterheld, Baidar Bakht, Frances Pritchett, Gail Minault, Ludmila Vassilieva.