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In the aftermath of New Historicism and Cultural Materialism, the field of Shakespeare Studies has been increasingly overrun by post-theoretical, phenomenological claims. Many of the critical tendencies that hold the field today—post-humanism, speculative realism, ecocriticism, historical phenomenology, new materialism, performance studies, animal studies, affect studies—are consciously or unwittingly informed by phenomenological assumptions. This book aims at uncovering and examining these claims, not only to assess their philosophical congruency but also to determine their hermeneutic relevance when applied to Shakespeare. More specifically, Unphenomenal Shakespeare deploys resources of speculative critique to resist the moralistic and aestheticist phenomenalization of the Shakespeare playtexts across a variety of schools and scholars, a tendency best epitomized in Bruce Smith’s Phenomenal Shakespeare (2010).
Iceland and Ireland, two North-Atlantic islands on the periphery of Europe, share a long history that reaches back to the ninth century. Direct contact between the islands has ebbed and flowed like their shared Atlantic tides over the subsequent millennium, with long blanks and periods of apparently very little exchange, transit or contact. These relational and regularly ruptured histories, discontinuities and dispossessions are discussed here less to cover (again) the well-trodden ground of our national traditions. Rather, this volume productively illuminates how a variety of memory modes, expressed in trans-cultural productions and globalized genre forms, such as museums cultures, crime novels, the lyric poem, the medieval codex or historical fiction, operate in multi-directional ways as fluid transnational agents of change in and between the two islands. At the same time, there is an alertness to the ways in which physical, political and linguistic isolation and exposure have also made these islands places of forgetting.
Towards a New Theoretical Justification of Biography
Volume Editors: Hans Renders and David Veltman
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Recent academic historiography has seen a profusion of theoretical perspectives on biography, both analytical and descriptive. Yet many biographers still fear ‘theory’ as antithetical to accessible narration of real lives.

This volume presents eighteen essays by more than a dozen scholars and practitioners from Australia, Belgium, Germany, Great Britain, Holland, Hungary, Iceland, and the United States who seek to banish such fear. Writing with candor, wide experience and familiarity with modern teaching, they examine the riches greeting the biographer willing to think more deeply about biography: its inner workings and rationale in a world still hungry for fact and truth.

Contributors are: Nigel Hamilton, Sigurður Gylfi Magnússon, Emma McEwin, Melanie Nolan, Kerstin Maria Pahl, Eric Palmen, Hans Renders, Carl Rollyson, David T. Roth, István M. Szijártó, Jeffrey Tyssens, and David Veltman.

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Volume Editor: Lee Templeton
This edited collection examines the ways in which medieval grief is both troubled and troubling––troubled in its representation, troubling to categories such as gender, identity, hierarchy, theology, and history, among others. Investigating various instantiations of grief—sorrow, sadness, and mourning; weeping and lamentation; spiritual and theological disorientation and confusion; keening and the drinking of blood; and grief-madness—through a number of theoretical lenses, including feminist, gender, and queer theories, as well as philosophical, sociological, and historical approaches to emotion, the collected essays move beyond simply describing how men and women grieve in the Middle Ages and begin interrogating the ways grief intersects with and shapes gender identity.
Contributors are Kim Bergqvist, Jim Casey, Danielle Marie Cudmore, Marjorie Housley, Erin. I. Mann, Inna Matyushina, Drew Maxwell, Kristen Mills, Jeffery G. Stoyanoff, Lee Templeton, and Kisha G. Tracy.
Posthumanism and Ancestrality
Before Humanity takes up the question of the post- in the posthuman from the position of ancestrality. Speculating about who or what comes after the human inevitably throws us back to our very beginnings. The before in Before Humanity in this context takes on two meanings: 1) what happened before we apparently became human? – which translates into a critical reading of paleo-anthropology, as well as evolutionary narratives of hominization; 2) living through the end of a certain (humanist, anthropocentric) notion of humanity, what tasks lie before us? – which provokes a critical reading of the Anthropocene and current narratives of geologization.
In other words, Before Humanity investigates conceptualizations of humanity and asks whether we have ever been human and if not, what could, or maybe what should we have been?
Editor: Pierino Gallo
Le statut polygraphique et la structure hétérogène de l’Histoire des deux Indes invitent à réexaminer les méthodes et les stratégies employées par les rédacteurs, et amènent à lire le texte dans une double perspective : celle dictée par la tradition historiographique et celle suggérée, en parallèle, par les intrusions du discours philosophique. C’est ce dernier aspect que tâchent d’interroger les études ici réunies, en mettant l’accent sur le recyclage des sources et le croisement des voix textuelles (ce qui finit par « mettre en scène » une pluralité de visions sur les thématiques traitées), sur les phénomènes rhétoriques utilisés par les auteurs (apostrophes, commentaires, dialogues fictifs et apartés), et/ou sur les figures qui marquent la narration d’une polyphonie subjective.

The polygraphic status and the heterogeneous structure of the Histoire des deux Indes invite us to re-examine the methods and strategies employed by the editors, and lead us to read the text from a double perspective: that dictated by the historiographical tradition and that suggested, in parallel, by the intrusions of philosophical discourse. It is this latter aspect that the articles gathered here attempt to examine, focusing on the recycling of sources and the crossing of textual voices (which ends up "staging" a plurality of visions on the themes treated), on the rhetorical phenomena used by the authors (apostrophes, commentaries, fictitious dialogues and asides), and/or on the figures that mark the narrative with a subjective polyphony.
On 7 January 2015, the day of the murderous attack on the offices of the Paris satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo, the cover of the current issue showed a drunken Michel Houellebecq in a wizard’s cap making two prophecies: “In 2016 I will lose my teeth. In 2022 I will observe Ramadan.” Houellebecq had previously described Islam as “the stupidest of religions.” But on that day, as terrorists sought to bring the justice of Islam to blasphemers for whom Michel Houellebecq was insufficiently anti-Islamic, Houellebecq’s novel Submission, depicting the democratic conquest of France by the Muslim Brotherhood, was published by Flammarion. In this collection, an international cast of authorities on politics and literature discuss the meaning and unprecedented impact of Michel Houellebecq’s Submission.