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International Intervention and the Formation of a Fragmented State
Author: Sara de Simone
How did South Sudan become one of the most striking examples of state-building failure and state collapse after years of international support? What went wrong in the state-building enterprise? How did external intervention overlap and intertwine with local processes of accumulation of power and of state formation? This book addresses these questions analysing the intersection between international and local actors and processes. Based on original ethnographic and archival data, it provides a unique account of how state-building resources were captured and manipulated by local actors at various levels, contributing to the deepening of ethnic fragmentation and the politicization of ethnicity.
In this groundbreaking book, Andrey Makarychev approaches populism through a critical biopolitical lens and shows that populist narratives are grounded intrinsically in corporeality, sexuality, health, bodily life and religious practices. The author demonstrates that populism is a phenomenon deeply rooted in mass culture. He compares three countries -- Estonia, Ukraine and Russia--that all share post-Soviet experiences offering a broad spectrum of populist discourses. The three case studies display the interconnection between biopower and populism through references to culture, media, art, theatrical performances and literature, raising new questions and directions for understanding traditional accounts of populism.
Co-constructing NGO Presence in Rural Malawi
Author: Thomas McNamara
In rural Northern Malawi, villagers co-construct meanings for NGOs’ projects and resources. NGOs and their staff are invoked within, yet simultaneously influence, intra-community debates. This book explores NGO presence through detailing relationships, personhoods and social changes within a rural community. It argues that NGOs’ projects have less impact on many Malawians’ lives than the ways their presence encourages villagers to re-image development and renegotiate intra-community obligations and entitlements. The book examines moral economies and discourses of development by detailing how development narratives are built around the symbols development actors emit. It also investigates the intra-village social lives of development brokers.
Author: Katrin Buchmann
Buchmann analyses the work of UK, German, Danish and Swedish embassies in the USA and China on climate change in the late 2000s and early 2010s. She relates which coalitions and narratives embassies sought to develop to convince China and the United States that a more progressive climate policy was possible, to achieve gains supporting an agreement under the UNFCCC. This book shows that a key interpretation of climate diplomacy was selling/trade: Europe selling technology “solutions” to solve climate change. In this narrative, Europe has already done what needs to be done and outsourcing of production to China e.g. is ignored. In the USA, embassies entered coalitions with states, faith groups and the military, arguing that a more progressive climate policy was mandated by either God or security concerns. State politicians, including Democrats, often actually didn’t implement any climate policies. Any gains were reversed through climate denial lobbying funded by corporations. Embassies did not address this.
Volume Editor: Christian Lequesne
Ministries of foreign affairs are prominent institutions at the heart of state diplomacy. Although they have lost their monopoly on the making of national foreign policies, they still are the operators of key practices associated with diplomacy: communication, representation and negotiation. Often studied in a monographic way, ministries of foreign affairs are undergoing an adaptation of their practices that require a global approach. This book fills a gap in the literature by approaching ministries of foreign affairs in a comparative and comprehensive way. The best international specialists in the field provide methodological and theoretical insights into how best to study institutions that remain crucial for the world diplomacy.

Contributors are: Stéphanie Balme, Thierry Balzacq, Guillaume Beaud, Gabriel Castillo, Andrew Cooper, Rhys Crilley, Jason Dittmer, Mikael Ekman, Bruno Figueroa, Karla Gobo, Minda Holm, Marcus Holmes, Walid Jumblatt Abdullah, Nicolaj Juncher Waedegaard, Casper Klynge, Halvard Leira, Christian Lequesne, Ilan Manor, Jan Melissen, Iver Neumann, Kim Olsen, Claudia Santos, Damien Spry, Jorge Schiavon Uriegas, Kamna Tiwary, Geoffrey Wiseman, and Reuben Wong.
Editors: Anthony Axon and Susan Hewitt
The fifth in the CAIW series, this title reflects 50 years of experience of Cambridge (UK)-based World of Information, which since 1975 has followed the region’s politics and economics.

In the period following the Second World War, Saudi Arabia – a curious fusion of medieval theocracy, unruly dictatorship and extrovert wealth - has been called a country of ‘superlatives.’ The modernisation of the Kingdom’s oil industry has been a smooth process: its oilfields are highly sophisticated. However, social modernisation has not kept pace. ‘Reform’, long a preoccupation among the Peninsula’s leaders does not necessarily go hand in hand with religion.
Launched in 1965, the Australian Year Book of International Law (AYBIL) is Australia’s longest standing and most prestigious dedicated international law publication.
The Year Book aims to uniquely combine scholarly commentary with contributions from Australian government officials. Each volume contains a mix of scholarly articles, invited lectures, book reviews, notes of decisions by Australian and international courts, recent legislation, and collected Australian international law state practice.
It is a valuable resource for those working in the field of international law, including government officials, international organisation officials, non-government and community organisations, legal practitioners, academics and other researchers, as well as students studying international law, international relations, human rights and international affairs.
It focuses on Australian practice in international law and general international law, across a broad range of sub-fields including human rights, environmental law and legal theory, which are of interest to international lawyers worldwide. This special issue of the Australian Year Book of International Law is a collection of essays providing commentary on how international law relates to the different dimensions of situations unfolding around us. Written during school shut-downs, campus closure, border restrictions, rising global infection rates and ongoing uncertainty as to what would happen next, they are also valuable reflections in a time of great crisis: fitting perhaps for a discipline famously critiqued by Hilary Charlesworth as one of crisis, rather than situated in the everyday. At root, this collection go some way in analysing and answering the question of how, exactly, COVID-19 will impact on international law more generally.
Read The Taiji Government and you will discover a bold and original revisionist interpretation of the formation of the Qing imperial constitution. Contrary to conventional wisdom, which portrays the Qing empire as a Chinese bureaucratic state that colonized Inner Asia, this book contends quite the reverse. It reveals the Qing as a Warrior State, a Manchu-Mongolian aristocratic union and a Buddhist caesaropapist monarchy. In painstaking detail, brushstroke by brushstroke, the author urges you to picture how the Mongolian aristocratic government, the Inner Asian military-oriented numerical divisional system, the technique of conquest rule, and the Mongolian doctrine of a universal Buddhist empire together created the last of the Inner Asian empires that conquered and ruled what is now China.
Series Editor: David Criekemans
Geopolitics and International Relations is a new and unique platform where a debate is possible between and within different schools of thought in geopolitics and international relations. It is conceived deliberately as a zone in which geopolitics and international relations can connect with each other rather than closing themselves off into existing publications in their respective fields. It also points to the increasing relevance of territorially embedded factors in the analysis of today’s international relations. In addition, the series is open to contributions from scholars working in other fields, such as historians, geographers, economists, political scientists, psychologists, specialists in international law, etc.

Today, more and more analysts are using the concept "geopolitics", but they do not always clearly define it (sometimes using it merely as a synonym for "power politics"). Geopolitics and International Relations presents a clear opportunity to connect, and it offers opportunities to academics, students, and practitioners to learn from each other, as well as more comprehensive analyses on the geopolitical challenges that affect many dimensions of the politics of today and tomorrow (security, economy, energy, environment, technology, and diplomacy & foreign policy).

Manuscripts should meet a minimum length requirement of 80,000 words.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts by email to the publisher Jason Prevost. Please direct all other correspondence to Associate Editor Jennifer Obdam.

Authors will find general proposal guidelines at the Brill Author Gateway.