Eine analytische Bibliographie. Band 4: 1700 - 1760
Ars Mercatoria ist ein Nachschlagewerk von euro-päischer Dimension. Es erschließt ein gewaltiges Textkorpus von kaum zu überschätzender Bedeu-tung für die Geschichte der materiellen Kultur Europas seit dem späten Mittelalter. Zwischen dem späten 15. und dem frühen 19. Jh. erschienen in ganz Europa mehr als 12.000 Anleitungen, die den Kaufleuten kommerzielles Wissen für die alltägliche Praxis zur Verfügung stellten. Ars Mercatoria eröffnet der historischen Wissenschaft den Zugang zu diesem Quellenfundus. Die Bibliographie ist das Ergebnis langjähriger sorgfältiger Forschungen in mehr als 300 europäischen und amerikanischen Bibliotheken. Die Subskriptionsfrist endet mit Erscheinen des letzten Bandes.
The Encyclopedia of Early Modern History offers 400 years of early modern history in one work. Experts from all over the world have joined in a presentation of the scholarship on the great era between the mid-15th to the mid-19th centuries. The perspective is European. That does not mean, however, that the view on the rest of the world is blocked. On the contrary: the multifaceted interrelatedness of European and other cultures is scrutinized extensively.

The Encyclopedia of Early Modern History addresses major historical questions:
- which ideas, inventions, and events changed people’s lives?
- in which ways did living conditions change?
- how do political, social, and economic developments interlock?
- which major cultural currents have begun to become apparent?
- how did historical interpretation of certain phenomena change?
The individual articles are connected to one another as in a web of red threads. The reader who follows the threads will keep coming upon new
and unexpected contexts and links.
How the First Jesuits Negotiated Religious Crisis in Early Modern Italy
In Between Popes, Inquisitors and Princes Jessica Dalton uses extensive, original archival research to provide the first history of a unique and controversial papal privilege that allowed the first Jesuits to absolve heretics in sixteenth-century Italy without involving bishops or inquisitors.
Dalton uses the story of this remarkable privilege to reconsider two central aspects of Jesuit history: their role in the Counter-Reformation and their relationship with the papacy. Dalton convincingly argues that, in the aftermath of the Protestant Reformation, the Jesuits were valued collaborators of popes, inquisitors and princes not for their obedience and subservience but rather because they worked with an autonomy and flexibility that allowed them convert heretics where political barriers and popular hostility hindered inquisitors and prelates.
Domestic Welfare, Discipline and the Church of Scotland, c. 1600-1689
Cultures of Care: Domestic Welfare, Discipline and the Church of Scotland, c. 1600-1689 explores voluntary networks of charity and their interaction with the Reformed Church of Scotland. Whereas most previous histories have assessed the growth of institutional charity, this book contends that the Reformed Church of Scotland was heavily reliant on informal, domestic, modes of self-help throughout the seventeenth century.
The existence and widespread acceptance of informal care dramatically changes our understanding of the impact of the Calvinist Reformation. Local ecclesiastical and secular leaders did not have a concerted policy to affect or ameliorate informal networks of care. Reformed authorities were members of these networks, as well as agents to police them, collapsing distinctions between informal and formal modes of Calvinist authority.
From 1585 to 1843, the Dutch town Franeker housed the University of Franeker. It had its peak in the seventeenth century and attracted students from Protestant countries throughout Europe. A library was founded right from the start and its collection has been preserved almost entirely. Eleven catalogues were printed in the course of its existence, and as a result the development of the collection can be examined chronologically.
The Library of Franeker University in Context, 1585-1843 discusses the relationship with education at Franeker University in detail, and makes a comparison with other similar libraries.
Part 1: 1548–1648
Calvinism in the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth 1548-1648 offers an in-depth history of the Reformed Churches in the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth in its first hundred years. Dr. Kazimierz Bem analyses church polity, liturgy, the practices of Calvinist church discipline and piety, and the reasons for conversion to and from Calvinism in all strata of the society. It offers a detailed history of the three Reformed Churches. Drawing on extensive research in primary sources, Dr. Bem challenges the dominant narrative of Protestant decline after 1570 and argues for a continued flourishing of Calvinism in the Commonwealth until the 1630s.
La materialidad de la escritura en las literaturas ibéricas de la Edad Media a la temprana modernidad
How is a body written, and in which ways can literary texts shed light on the tension between immediate bodily expressions and writing if medieval writing practices compete with the new technology of printing? The present volume Escritura somática: La materialidad de la escritura en las literaturas ibéricas de la Edad Media a la temprana modernidad explores the relations between corporality and writing in genres and discourses that are key for understanding the phenomenon. The Iberian perspective, including contributions on Spanish and Portuguese texts, focusses on the materiality of writing with a shared epistemic frame.

Contributors are Isabel de Barros Dias, Stephanie Béreiziat-Lang, Juan Casas Rigall, Robert Folger, Juan Pablo Mauricio García Álvarez, Miguel García-Bermejo Giner, Folke Gernert, Santiago Gutiérrez García, Simon Kroll, Miriam Palacios Larrosa, Adrián J. Sáez, and Margarida Santos Alpalhão.
Faith, Politics, and Resistance in Post-Reformation England, 1570-1603
In The Excommunication of Elizabeth I, Aislinn Muller examines the excommunication and deposition of Queen Elizabeth I of England by the Roman Catholic Church, and its political afterlife during her reign. Muller shows that Elizabeth’s excommunication was a crucial turning point for both Catholics and Protestants, one that irrevocably changed attitudes towards the queen, widened political participation and resistance, and posed a destabilising threat to her regime. The Excommunication of Elizabeth I demonstrates how this event exacerbated religious tensions in England’s foreign and domestic politics, and how Elizabeth’s conflict with the papacy shaped the development of anti-Catholicism in post-Reformation England.
Integration and Segregation in Southeastern Europe and Beyond, 1050-1970
Tracing Hospital Boundaries explores, for the first time, how the forces of both integration and segregation shaped hospitals and their communities between the eleventh and twentieth centuries in Europe, North America and Africa. Within this broad comparative context it also shines a light on a number of case studies from Southeastern Europe.
The eleven chapters show how people’s access to, and experience of, healthcare institutions was affected by social, cultural and economic, as well as medical, dynamics. These same factors intersected with developing healthcare technologies to shape hospital design and location, as well as internal policies and practices. The volume produces a new history of the hospital in which boundaries – both physical and symbolic – are frequently redrawn and contested.

Contributors are Irena Benyovsky Latin, David Gentilcore, Annemarie Kinzelbach, Rina Kralj-Brassard, Ivana Lazarević, Clement Masakure, Anna Peterson, Egidio Priani, Gordan Ravančić, Jonathan Reinarz, Jane Stevens Crawshaw, David Theodore, Christina Vanja, George Weisz, and Valentina Živković.
The issue of whether the writings of Thomas Aquinas show internal contradictions has not only stirred readers from his earliest, often critical, reception, but also led to the emergence of a literary genre that has crucial relevance to the history of medieval Thomism. Concordances were drawn up which listed Thomas’ contradictory statements and, in most cases, tried to disguise the appearance of contradiction by exegesis. But what was at stake in this interpretive endeavor? What role did the concordances play in shaping Thomism? What tensions did they reveal in the works of Thomas? The book aims to investigate these questions and puts the concordance of Peter of Bergamo (†1482), which represents the most important example of this type of text, at the center of the investigation.
Contributors are Marieke Abram, Kent Emery, Jr., Maarten J.F.M. Hoenen, Isabel Iribarren, Thomas Jeschke, Catherine König-Pralong, Mario Meliadò, Silvia Negri, Zornitsa Radeva, and Peter Walter.