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This book presents an analysis of the social aspects of Carl Gustav Jung's thought and its followers, the interpretation of the phenomena of contemporary social life (social imagery) from the perspective of the main categories of this thought (archetype, unconscious, collectivity, mass society, mass man). It also contains an attempt of their application for understanding contemporary social and political phenomena (e.g. Brazilian sebastianism, Balkan conflicts, virtual-imagery sphere of communication, figures of imagery in popular culture, and others). The authors examine the relationship between Jung’s and Jungians' (E. Neumann, J. Hillman, J. L. Henderson) conceptions and many accompanying them (e.g. Frankfurt school, Bachelard’s philosophy, American cultural psychoanalysis) and the background of contemporary social psychology, sociology, and cultural anthropology.
Author:
In Rescuing Autonomy from Kant, James Furner argues that Marxism’s relation to Kant’s ethics is not one of irrelevance, complementarity or incompatibility, but critique. Although Kant’s formulas of the categorical imperative presuppose a belief in God that Kant cannot motivate, the value of autonomy can instead be grounded by appeal to an antinomy in capitalism’s basic structure, and this commits us to socialism.
This book is a masterpiece of critical theory. It provides an illuminating and original meta-theoretical account of Marx’s general views of critical economic theory. Sympathetic to the general aims of Marx, it also excavates the internal contradictions of the Marxian theory with unparalleled care. Written in Hungarian in the early 1970s, it was censored by the communist authorities immediately after its completion. Its belated publication in English signifies a major boon for research scholars in a range of disciplines, including philosophy, political economy, Marxism, intellectual history, and Eastern European studies.
Globalization is a defining characteristic of our contemporary world, with a reach and impact affecting all nations and peoples. Philosophical Aspects of Globalization is a collection of essays by leading contemporary Russian philosophers, scholars, and scientists concerned with addressing pressing issues of globalization from a philosophical point of view. The thirty-four authors who have contributed to this book represent a range of approaches and subfields of Global Studies in Russia, including topics such as theory of globalization, globalization and the environment, history and geopolitics, and globalization in cultural context. When compiled together in a single collection of essays, their work offers the English-speaking reader a comprehensive picture of new directions in Russian Global Studies in the twenty-first century, as well as demonstrates the importance of questions of globalization for philosophical inquiry in Russia today.
Translator:
Hiromatsu argues that the change from Marx's theory of self-alienation to the concept of reification is crucial in establishing a new relational worldview which is still relevant today. Amongst other topics, his discussion of the understanding of society sees such as a relational dynamic wherein the individual is constantly composed and composing in relation to others, including nature. This understanding is, he argues, the “single science of history” of Marx and Engels. It overcomes the hypostasizing subject - object relation still prevalent today.

Originally published in Japanese as Busshōkaron no kōzu by Iwanami Shoten, Publishers, Tokyo, 1983, 1994. © By Kuniko Hiromatsu.
Author:
Louis Althusser argued that Marx initiated a transformation of philosophy, a new way of doing philosophy. This book follows that provocation to examine the way in which central Marxist concepts and problems from primitive accumulation to real abstraction animate and inform philosophers from Theodor Adorno to Paolo Virno. While also examining the way in which reading Marx casts new light on such philosophers as Spinoza. At the centre of this transformation is the production of subjectivity, the manner in which relations of production produces ways of thinking and living.
The Anthology of the Works of Ugo Spirito captures the trajectory of Ugo Spirito’s complex body of thought that spanned more than fifty years, from 1921 to 1977. While confronting difficult contemporary problems related to philosophy and science, liberalism and socialism, fascism and communism, and other economic and ideological aspects such as corporativism and democracy, Spirito revealed a persistent desire to reach truth and the absolute. Yet, he also voiced his failure to remain faithful to any philosophical or political system considered definitive and unquestionable. Unable to reach incontrovertibility, he consistently dissected the prevailing contemporary ideas and systems, including his own beliefs, developing at the same time the ‘antinomic’ approach, a method of critical analysis that undermined any truth reputed irrefutable. Today, Spirito stands as one of most anti-conformist Italian thinkers for he challenged the certainties of modern thought.
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Karel Kosík (1926–2003) was one of the most remarkable Czech Marxist philosophers of the twentieth century. His reputation as a creative thinker is owed largely to his philosophical ‘blockbuster’ Dialectics of the Concrete, first published in Czechoslovakia in 1963. In reintroducing Kosík’s philosophy to English-speaking readers, we show that Kosík’s work is important not only as a leading intellectual document of the Prague Spring, but also as an original theoretical contribution with international impact that sheds light on the meaning of labour and praxis, cognition and economic structure, and revolution and the crises of modernity.

Contributors include: Ian Angus, Siyaves Azeri, Vít Bartoš, Jan Černý, Joseph Grim Feinberg, Diana Fuentes, Gabriella Fusi, Tomáš Hermann, Tomáš Hříbek, Xiaohan Huang, Peter Hudis, Petr Kužel, Ivan Landa, Michael Löwy, Jan Mervart, Anselm K. Min, Tom Rockmore, Francesco Tava, and Xinruo Zhang.
Through a discussion with current perspectives in philosophy of history – especially with a critical approach to Paul Ricœur’s work – and a rigorous reading of Karl Marx’s oeuvre, Karl Marx, Historian of Social Times and Spaces proposes an interpretation of Marx's concept and method of historical knowledge. In this sense the examination of Marx's concepts of social space and social time serve to highlight the possibilities of his work in terms of the explanation of the dynamics of complex multilinear development of human societies and of capitalism in particular.
Translator:
The German-Austrian social theorist and philosopher Leo Kofler (1907–1995) represents what Oskar Negt once called ‘unmutilated, living Marxism’. Throughout his life he dealt with issues of history and modernity, Marxist philosophy and the critique of ideology, philosophical anthropology and aesthetics. In this volume, author and Kofler biographer Christoph Jünke elucidates the contours of his philosophy of praxis, traces an arc from the socialist classics to postmodernism, and outlines the socialist humanist thinker’s enduring relevance. The book also includes six essays by Leo Kofler published in English for the first time.

The main work was first published in German as Leo Koflers Philosophie der Praxis: Eine Einführung in sein Denken by Laika Verlag, 2015, ISBN 978-944233-33-8. Copyright by Laika Verlag.