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An Edition and Annotated Translation of Mālinīślokavārttika I, 1-399
The first part of the ‘Versified Commentary on the Mālinītantra’ (Mālinīślokvārttika) by the tenth-century theologian Abhinavagupta, which is translated here for the first time, presents a philosophy of Śaiva revelation, conceived of as a descent of the highest non-dual form of knowledge, through the different levels of speech, into the knowledge embodied in the canon of Tantras or Agamas on which the Śaiva religion is based. The aim of the text is to demonstrate the logic behind the claim of the monistic Tantric schools on which Abhinavagupta bases his philosophy.

The present volume deals in its introduction with the scriptural background of the Śaiva religion because that is a prerequisite for understanding many of the arguments in the text. The translation is accompanied by a re-edition of the Sanskrit text with the help of two manuscripts not consulted before, and a running commentary. A fragment of the Śrīkaṇṭī, which is probably the source for some of Abhinavaguptas theories of the Śaiva canon, is transcribed in an appendix.

Index of South and Southeast Asian Art and Archaeology
The ABIA Online bibliography (South and Southeast Asian Art and Archaeology Index) helps scholars and students trace publications on the art and architecture, archaeology, inscriptions, coins and crafts of South and Southeast Asia. Its coverage includes the shared cultural heritage of Buddhism, Hinduism and Islam. It also brings out the bonds between South and Southeast Asia in societal traditions and ceremonies, as evident in inscriptions, trade and craft specializations, right from the prehistoric past up to the present.

ABIA’s geographic and topical reach is wide. Its coverage ranges from excavations at the early cities of the Indus Valley in Pakistan to the sculptural richness of Angkor’s temples in Cambodia; from Buddhist manuscript art in Nepal and Tibet to contemporary painting in Bali; from textiles woven for early kings of Thailand to present day fashion in the booming cities of India. Timewise, ABIA’s coverage spans from the time when human activity becomes archaeologically manifest, to modern times.
Specialist bibliographers have compiled some 55,000 records since 1928. Many of these carry annotations that concisely explain their contents. All records come with field-specific keywords. Recent records often offer direct links through DOI or http addresses to the articles. The ABIA Online is updated on a quarterly basis to keep up with new academic publications. The database is a long-term recipient of support by the Jan Gonda Fonds of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences.
The twenty-nine Buddhist caves near Ajanta form a devotional complex which ranks as one of the world's most startling achievements, created at the very apogee of India's Golden Age.
Ajanta: History and Development, to appear as part of the series Handbook of Oriental Studies, presents the reader with a systematic treatment of all aspects of the site, the result of forty years of painstaking research in situ by Walter M. Spink.
The making of the Indo-Islamic world
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Volume I
In this volume, André Wink analyzes the beginning of the process of momentous and long-term change that came with the Islamization of the regions that the Arabs called al-Hind—India and large parts of its Indianized hinterland. In the seventh to eleventh centuries, the expansion of Islam had a largely commercial impact on al-Hind. In the peripheral states of the Indian subcontinent, fluid resources, intensive raiding and trading activity, as well as social and political fluidity and openness produced a dynamic impetus that was absent in the densely settled agricultural heartland. Shifts of power occurred, in combination with massive transfers of wealth across multiple centers along the periphery of al-Hind. These multiple centers mediated between the world of mobile wealth on the Islamic-Sino-Tibetan frontier (which extended into Southeast Asia) and the world of sedentary agriculture, epitomized by brahmanical temple Hinduism in and around Kanauj in the heartland. The growth and development of a world economy in and around the Indian Ocean—with India at its center and the Middle East and China as its two dynamic poles—was effected by continued economic, social, and cultural integration into ever wider and more complex patterns under the aegis of Islam.

Early medieval India and the expansion of Islam 7th-11th centuries is also available in hardback (isbn 90 04 09249 8)

Volume II
During the early medieval Islamic expansion in the seventh to eleventh centuries, al-Hind (India and its Indianized hinterland) was characterized by two organizational modes: the long-distance trade and mobile wealth of the peripheral frontier states, and the settled agriculture of the heartland. These two different types of social, economic, and political organization were successfully fused during the eleventh to thirteenth centuries, and India became the hub of world trade. During this period, the Middle East declined in importance, Central Asia was unified under the Mongols, and Islam expanded far into the Indian subcontinent. Instead of being devastated by the Mongols, who were prevented from penetrating beyond the western periphery of al-Hind by the absence of sufficient good pasture land, the agricultural plains of North India were brought under Turko-Islamic rule in a gradual manner in a conquest effected by professional armies and not accompanied by any large-scale nomadic invasions. The result of the conquest was, in short, the revitalization of the economy of settled agriculture through the dynamic impetus of forced monetization and the expansion of political dominion. Islamic conquest and trade laid the foundation for a new type of Indo-Islamic society in which the organizational forms of the frontier and of sedentary agriculture merged in a way that was uniquely successful in the late medieval world at large, setting the Indo-Islamic world apart from the Middle East and China in the same centuries.

The Slave Kings and the Islamic Conquest, 11th-13th Centuries is also available in hardback (ISBN 90 04 10236 1)
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This book is the first of a projected series of five which aims to analyse the process of momentous and long-term change which came with the Islamization of the regions which the Arabs called al-Hind, that is India and large parts of its Indianized hinterland. The series is set up in a chronological order, starting with the early expansion of the caliphate in the seventh and eight centuries and ending with the beginnings of European colonization. In this millennium of Islamic expansion five successive stages are distinguished, taking into account the world-historical context.
Each stage will be covered by a separate volume. The present volumes covers the period of the seventh to eleventh centuries, the early medieval period in which the Islamic Middle East acquires economic supremacy while establishing new links between the Mediterranean and the Indian Ocean.
Subsequent volumes will cover the periods of the eleventh to thirteenth centuries (volume 2), the fourteenth to fifteenth centuries (3), the sixteenth to seventeenth centuries (4), and the eighteenth century (5).
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This is the second of a projected series of five volumes dealing with the expansion of Islam in al-Hind, or South and Southeast Asia. While the previous volume covered the 7th-11th centuries, this new volume deals principally with the Islamic conquest of the 11th-13th centuries.
The book also provides an analysis of the newly emerging organizational forms of the Indo-Islamic state in these centuries, migration patterns which developed between the Middle East, Central Asia and South Asia, maritime developments in the Indian Ocean, and religious change.
The comparative and world-historical perspective which is advanced here on the dynamic interaction between nomadic and agricultural societies should make it of interest to all historians concerned with Asia in this period.
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The Analytical Method of Navya-Nyāya argues that Udayana, who lived in the 11th century, is the founder of Navya-nyāya. A discussion of Navya-nyāya method of philosophical or logical analysis is presented, and an annotated translation of the “Lion’s and Tiger’s Definitions Section” of Mathurānātha’s Tattvacintāmaṇirahasya (TCR).
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This collection of essays grew out of the symposium, “Art and Politics in South Asia,” held at Boston College on October 5, 2002 and sponsored by the Norma Jean Calderwood Professorship in Islamic and Asian Art. Art, Religion, and Politics in South Asia connects the arts of the past to the problems of the present and to matters of increasing relevance in today’s world. This special issue includes essays by Catherine B. Asher, Phillip B. Wagoner, and Frederick M. Asher.

Art, Religion and Politics in South Asia was originally published as issue 1 of Volume 8 (2004) of Brill's journal Religion and the Arts. For more details on this journal, please click here.