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This first English volume of The China Legal Development Yearbook features reports on and analyses of a wide range of topics vital to the development of China's legal system, including: criminal law, judicial administration, labor regulations, environmental law, public health law, and issues of corruption. The yearbook is edited by the Institute of Law at the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, and also includes contributions from practitioners within the Chinese legal system.
Editor:
This volume of the China Legal Development Yearbook is the second in a series of annual reports written by leading Chinese law and legal policy scholars and judges. It is edited by the Institute of Law at the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences. The Yearbook contains reports on law reform priorities, major legal policy debates and an account of legislation proposed and passed in 2006. This Yearbook features reports on those legal reforms seeking to strengthen the rule of law and to make the administration of justice more “people-oriented”. It contains articles and reports on reforms made to improve the standard of judicial justice, reforms to the criminal justice system, as well as evaluations of the functioning of systems of administrative litigation, review and state compensation. Chapters also address human rights issues and analyse current problems relating to dispute resolution. This Yearbook provides a valuable insight into contemporary debates in China about the substance, direction and priorities of legal reform.
Editor:
This volume of The China Legal Development Yearbook is the third in a series of annual reports written by leading Chinese law and legal policy scholars and judges to appear in English translation. It is edited by scholars at the Institute of Law of the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences. This 2008 yearbook reviews major legal developments in 2007, including law reform priorities, major legal policy debates and newly enacted legislation. It also provides reports on administrative, judicial and prosecutorial reforms, the practice of public law, the death penalty, compensation for victims of crimes, human rights, the law of labor contracts, the antimonopoly law, administrative charges, food and drug safety, and intellectual property. This yearbook provides valuable insight into contemporary debates in China about the substance, direction and priorities of legal reform.
Editor:
This volume of The China Legal Development Yearbook is the fourth in a series of annual reports written by leading Chinese law and legal policy scholars and judges to appear in English translation. It is edited by scholars at the Institute of Law of the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences. This 2009 yearbook reviews major legal developments in 2008, including law reform priorities, major legal policy debates and newly enacted legislation. It also provides reports on food safety, penal law, tax law, earthquake legislation, credit card regulation, procuratorate system reform, medical reform, legal education, and disclosure under the law. This yearbook provides valuable insight into contemporary debates in China about the substance, direction and priorities of legal reform.
Editor:
This volume of the China Legal Development Yearbook marks the 60th anniversary of the founding of the PRC. Various aspects of law and regulation that are giving shape to China’s legal system are examined in this volume of the Yearbook. The editors present an informative and comprehensive volume, covering both general topics such as administrative law reform, as well as analysing a number specific areas of interest such as military law and the new food safety regime. 2009 was also a year when the full impact of the global financial crisis (GFC) was felt in China’s economy and society. Some of the chapters in this volume reflect upon aspects of these challenges with chapters on legislative responses to social instability and crime as well as on economic reform.
Launched in 1965, the Australian Year Book of International Law (AYBIL) is Australia’s longest standing and most prestigious dedicated international law publication.
The Year Book aims to uniquely combine scholarly commentary with contributions from Australian government officials. Each volume contains a mix of scholarly articles, invited lectures, book reviews, notes of decisions by Australian and international courts, recent legislation, and collected Australian international law state practice.
It is a valuable resource for those working in the field of international law, including government officials, international organisation officials, non-government and community organisations, legal practitioners, academics and other researchers, as well as students studying international law, international relations, human rights and international affairs.
It focuses on Australian practice in international law and general international law, across a broad range of sub-fields including human rights, environmental law and legal theory, which are of interest to international lawyers worldwide.
Launched in 1965, the Australian Year Book of International Law (AYBIL) is Australia’s longest standing and most prestigious dedicated international law publication.
The Year Book aims to uniquely combine scholarly commentary with contributions from Australian government officials. Each volume contains a mix of scholarly articles, invited lectures, book reviews, notes of decisions by Australian and international courts, recent legislation, and collected Australian international law state practice.
It is a valuable resource for those working in the field of international law, including government officials, international organisation officials, non-government and community organisations, legal practitioners, academics and other researchers, as well as students studying international law, international relations, human rights and international affairs.
It focuses on Australian practice in international law and general international law, across a broad range of sub-fields including human rights, environmental law and legal theory, which are of interest to international lawyers worldwide.
Launched in 1965, the Australian Year Book of International Law (AYBIL) is Australia’s longest standing and most prestigious dedicated international law publication.
The Year Book aims to uniquely combine scholarly commentary with contributions from Australian government officials. Each volume contains a mix of scholarly articles, invited lectures, book reviews, notes of decisions by Australian and international courts, recent legislation, and collected Australian international law state practice.
It is a valuable resource for those working in the field of international law, including government officials, international organisation officials, non-government and community organisations, legal practitioners, academics and other researchers, as well as students studying international law, international relations, human rights and international affairs.
It focuses on Australian practice in international law and general international law, across a broad range of sub-fields including human rights, environmental law and legal theory, which are of interest to international lawyers worldwide. Volume 36 features an Agora on the 2018 Timor Sea Treaty and Conciliation between Australia and Timor Leste.
Launched in 1965, the Australian Year Book of International Law (AYBIL) is Australia’s longest standing and most prestigious dedicated international law publication.
The Year Book aims to uniquely combine scholarly commentary with contributions from Australian government officials. Each volume contains a mix of scholarly articles, invited lectures, book reviews, notes of decisions by Australian and international courts, recent legislation, and collected Australian international law state practice.
It is a valuable resource for those working in the field of international law, including government officials, international organisation officials, non-government and community organisations, legal practitioners, academics and other researchers, as well as students studying international law, international relations, human rights and international affairs.
It focuses on Australian practice in international law and general international law, across a broad range of sub-fields including human rights, environmental law and legal theory, which are of interest to international lawyers worldwide. Volume 37 features a Tobacco Plain Packaging Agora.
Launched in 1965, the Australian Year Book of International Law (AYBIL) is Australia’s longest standing and most prestigious dedicated international law publication.
The Year Book aims to uniquely combine scholarly commentary with contributions from Australian government officials. Each volume contains a mix of scholarly articles, invited lectures, book reviews, notes of decisions by Australian and international courts, recent legislation, and collected Australian international law state practice.
It is a valuable resource for those working in the field of international law, including government officials, international organisation officials, non-government and community organisations, legal practitioners, academics and other researchers, as well as students studying international law, international relations, human rights and international affairs.
It focuses on Australian practice in international law and general international law, across a broad range of sub-fields including human rights, environmental law and legal theory, which are of interest to international lawyers worldwide. Volume 38 features a set of Special Issue papers on the theme of ‘The Backlash against International Law: Australian Perspectives’. These articles originated as papers presented to a June 2019 workshop at the Australian National University (ANU), which launched a global research partnership project between scholars at ANU, Indiana University and the University of Maryland.