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The 2022 Brill Online Journal Collection Middle East & Islamic Studies gives access to the online content available back to the year 2000 of Brill´s 2022 Middle East & Islamic Studies journal program.

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  • In 2022 Brill offers the following Journal Collections:

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2021 Impact Factor: 0,250
5 Year Impact Factor: 0,278

The journal presents a scholarly account of studies of individuals and societies in Africa and Asia. Its scope is to publish original research by social scientists in the area of anthropology, sociology, history, political science and related social sciences about African and Asian societies and cultures and their relationships.

The journal focuses on problems and possibilities, past and future. Where possible, comparisons are made between countries and continents. Articles should be based on original research and can be co-authored.

From 1966 to 2001 African and Asian Studies was published under the name of Journal of African and Asian Studies.

The Clarivate Analytics Journal Citations Report for 2020 ranks African and Asian Studies with an Impact Factor of 0.310.
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Contributor:
Kitab al-Tanbih wa-al-israf / li-Abi al-Hasan Ali b. al-Husayn al-Masudi. M.J. de Goeje’s Classic Edition (1894) with Indices and Glossary to BGA I: 7–8
Editor:
Al-Masʿūdī composed his Kitāb al-Tanbīh wal-ishrāf in the years 955 and 956, finishing it not long before his death. Based in part on earlier historical-geographical works, it offers a description of astronomical and meteorological phenomena; the divisions of the earth; the seas; ancient nations; universal chronology, and then the history of Islam until the caliphate of al-Muṭīʿ (r. 946-74).
Author:
M.J. de Goeje’s Classic Edition of Taʾrīkh al-rusul wa-l-mulūk by al-Ṭabarī / Annales quos scripsit Abu Djafar Mohammed Ibn Djarir At-Tabari
Apologie éthiopienne du Christianisme contre l'Islam à partir du Coran. Introduction, texte critique, traduction par E.J. van Donzel
Author:
Contributor:
Eventually to be completed in six volumes Arabic Literature of Africa will provide a survey of Muslim authors writing in Arabic in Saharan and sub-Saharan Africa and a bibliography of their works. Falling within the tradition of the great works of Brockelmann and Sezgin, it will form a basic reference tool for the study of Arabic writing in areas of the African Islamic world that fall outside the parameters of these works. While primarily a work of reference, it will also attempt to provide an outline of the intellectual history of Muslim societies in the areas it covers: the Nile valley, East Africa and the Horn of Africa, West Africa and the western Sahara, from earliest times to the present.
Editor:
The present volume is fascicle A of volume III of Arabic Literature of Africa, edited by J.O. Hunwick and R.S. O'Fahey. The fascicle, compiled by O'Fahey and several collaborators, covers the Islamic writings of Northeastern Africa in Arabic and in several local languages, including Amharic, Tigrinya, Harari and Somali.
Geographically, the fascicle covers the modern states of Eritrea, Ethiopia, Djibouti and Somalia. Although the Islamic literature of the region is limited, it includes an important poetic tradition in Somali and Harari and the writings of a major scholar of the colonial period in Eritrea. The volume is divided into four chapters and follows the usual ALA format. It will be followed by fascicle B, which will cover East Africa, especially Kenya and Tanzania.
Arabic Manuscripts in the JNUL, Jerusalem
Jewish National and University Library, Jerusalem

The Professor Yahuda Collection
The well-known orientalist, Prof. Abraham Shalom Yahuda (Jerusalem, 1877 - New Haven, 1951) studied in Heidelberg and Strasbourg, and taught at the Berlin Hochschule, the University of Madrid, and the New School for Social Research in New York. He acquired a valuable collection of manuscripts, particularly Arabic material purchased mainly in Egypt. Parts of his manuscript collection were sold by him to various institutions (see: R. Mach, Catalogue of Arabic MSS (Yahuda Collection) in the Garrett Collection, Princeton 1977, “Introduction”). The Yahuda Collection of the JNUL consists of the manuscripts he kept until his death, which were donated to the JNUL by his family; their importance is in no way inferior to that of the manuscripts he sold.

The collection contains 1,155 manuscripts written in Arabic characters, most of them Arabic and about 10 % of them Persian and Ottoman. A considerable part of the collection consists of multititle codices, which brings the total number of titles in the collection to about 3,000.
Approximately one-third of the manuscripts are medieval, dating from the ninth to the sixteenth century.

The contents of the manuscripts include all areas of Islamic and Arabic sciences and Arabic, Persian and Ottoman literature. Some 400 titles are not listed by Brockelmann or other bibliographical sources, and are thus of great importance for research; for many other titles only single or very few other manuscripts are known, which makes them valuable for textual criticism and critical editions. Of special interest are the medical manuscripts, the majority of which are Persian. A collection of more than 100 Qurans, dating from the ninth to the nineteenth century, vividly illustrates the history of the Quran's calligraphy. A large proportion of the Persian and Ottoman manuscripts are illuminated, and contribute to the history of Persian and Ottoman art.