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Volume Editor:
In Family and Social Change in Socialist and Post-Socialist Societies, the authors address the social transformations of eight transitional societies in recent decades (Russia, Ukraine, Poland, Slovakia, Hungary, Romania, China and Vietnam). Each chapter discusses a different society and reveals their struggles in the reconstruction of the intimate and public spheres amid the post-Cold War period.

Making use of a semi-structured analytical framework, the respective chapters address the ambiguous relationship between familism and individualisation seen through change and continuity in demographic behaviour, family values, family solidarity, gender relations, state policy and marketisation. The volume also outlines the possibility of a modified second demographic transition theory as a correction of Western-based interpretations of current social trends.

Contributors include: Zsombor Rajkai, Yulia Gradskova, Lyudmyla Males, Tymur Sandrovych, Maƚgorzata Sikorska, Peter Guráň, Jarmila Filadelfiová, Miloš Debnár, Csaba Dupcsik, Olga Tóth, Borbála Kovács, Zhou Weihong, Liu Wenrong, Xue Yali, Nguyen Huu Minh, Chang Kyung-Sup.

Hakka Identity in the Remaking
Author:
In Global Hakka: Hakka Identity in the Remaking Jessieca Leo offers a needed update on Hakka history and a reassessment of Hakka identity in the global and transnational contexts. Leo gives fresh insights into concepts such as ethnicity, identity, Han, Chineseness, overseas Chinese, and migration in relation to Hakka identity.

Globalization, transnationalism, deterritorialization and migration drive the rapid transformation and reformation of Hakka identity to the point of no return. Dehakkalization through cultural adaptation or genetic transfer has created an elastic identity in the global Hakka and different kinds of Hakka communities around the world.

Jessieca Leo convincingly shows that the concept of ‘being Hakka’ in the twenty-first century is better referred to as Hakkaness – a quality determined by lifestyle and personal choices.

"Among the Chinese, tradition long resisted the idea of migration. In practice, however, there were many layers of adaptation to different circumstances. The Hakka have been exceptional in having always been conscious of their migratory successes. This book explores with great sensitivity how Hakka history outside China influences the way they respond to the new global environment. Combining careful scholarship with self-discovery, Jessieca Leo captures the processes by which one group of Chinese became migrants who consider migration as normal. Her fascinating and original work takes the study of the Hakka to a higher level and offers fresh insights for understanding how other migratory Chinese are transforming tradition today."
Professor Wang Gungwu, National University of Singapore
Ethnic, Family, and Gender Identities in an Early Modern Maritime World
Author:
With the Fujian coast at its center, this book reveals the intellectual, migratory and gendered relationships that tied Fijian to the Chinese imperial domain and to its overseas networks. This Fujian study also offers ways to analyze local histories of late imperial China from a more global perspective. Based on a wide range of sources, such as business contracts, legal documents, women’s writings, and folksongs, Migrating Fujianese elucidates China’s southeast coast and its migration patterns. Examining this multi-ethnic migrant community through the lens of ethnicity shows the complex operation of linked chain migration (overseas male emigration and overland family migration by the ethnic She people) and its impact on the gender relations and family strategies of the coastal people. The study argues that examination of Fujianese migration through the lenses of gender and ethnicity is crucial to understanding the relationship between the flow of people and the society nourishing that flow.
In Chinese and Indian Merchants in Modern Asia, the contributors put together an important and lucid study of overseas Chinese and Indian merchants and their impacts on the emerging global economy from the nineteenth to twentieth centuries. In contrast to the conventional focus on the merchants’ networks per se, the chapters of this volume uncover their “networking,” the process in which they constructed and utilized linkages based on the shared concepts such as caste, kin alliances, and religion. By analyzing the interactions between the merchants and the European and Japanese empires, along with Asian states, this volume provides the critical insights into the configuration of the regional economic order in the past and at present.
Diasporic Politics among the Second Generation
Volume Editor:
Read an interview with Robyn Rodriguez.

Filipino American Transnational Activism: Diasporic Politics among the Second Generation offers an account of how Filipinos born or raised in the United States often defy the multiple assimilationist agendas that attempt to shape their understandings of themselves. Despite conditions that might lead them to reject any kind of relationship to the Philippines in favor of a deep rootedness in the United States, many forge linkages to the “homeland” and are actively engaged in activism and social movements transnationally. Though it may well be true that most Filipino Americans have an ambivalent relationship to the Philippines, many of the chapters of this book show that other possibilities for belonging and imaginaries of “home” are being crafted and pursued.
What were the changes in the international position of the Brazilian state during the Lula and Cardoso administrations? How were the classes and class fractions represented? These are the questions that Tatiana Berringer's work seeks to answer. Using the theoretical instruments of the Marxist Nicos Poulantzas, the book identifies the class interests that directed the international action of the Brazilian state. With notable originality, the text presents, theoretically and empirically, a truly consistent Marxist analysis of Brazilian foreign policy, as well as a rich interpretation of the class struggle in current Brazilian politics. The author offers the reader her reflections on the political crisis of 2016 and the foreign policy of the Dilma, Temer, and Bolsonaro governments.
Author:
Using a Canadian case study, this book demonstrates that Dutch immigrant farmers have a global competitive advantage. It also deals with the implications, both beneficial and harmful, of positive stereotyping, in this case the reputation of the Dutch as successful farmers. Farming in a Global Economy consists of three parts. The first provides an overview of farming and migration in the Netherlands and Ontario. Part two deals with Dutch farmers in Ontario from a historical and a sociological perspective, telling the story of postwar farm immigrants, much of it in their own words. The last part covers the Dutch presence in, and impact on, Ontario agriculture.