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In Vulnerability and Critical Theory, Estelle Ferrarese identifies contemporary developments on the theme of vulnerability within critical theory while also seeking to reconstruct an idea of vulnerability that enables an articulation of the political and demonstrates how it is socially produced. Philosophies that take vulnerability as a moral object contribute to rendering the political, as the site of a specific power and action, foreign to vulnerability and the notion of recognition offered by critical theory does not correct this deficit. Instead, Ferrarese argues that vulnerability, as susceptibility to a harmful event, is above all a breach of normative expectations. She demonstrates that these expectations are not mental phenomena but are situated between subjects and must even be conceived as institutions. On this basis she argues that the link between the political and vulnerability cannot be reduced to the institutional implementation of moral principles. Rather she seeks to rethink the political by taking vulnerability as the starting point and thereby understands the political as simultaneously referring to the advent of a world, the emergence of a relation, and the appearance of a political subject.
Ascertaining the nature and scope of a priori knowledge is of key import to philosophical thought. Philosophers do not merely ponder this issue in order to solve an epistemological puzzle. Philosophers do also strive to understand the a priori in order to understand what doing philosophy amounts to. So what is the nature of a priori knowledge? And is philosophy an a priori endeavour? Starting off from such epistemological and meta-philosophical considerations, the papers here collected trace the import and role of a priori knowledge through the diverse disciplines of philosophy - from metaphysics to ethics, and from the philosophy of Language to the philosophy of science. The Contributors A. Burri, S. Psillos and D. Christopoulou, G. Ernst, H.-J. Glock., S. Häggqvist, P. Horwich, N. Kompa, C. Misselhorn, C. Nimtz, G. Rey, O. Scholz, W. Spohn, I. Stojanovic, N. Strobach, C. Suhm
Editor / Translator: David Healan
Metabolic form inverts itself into content. Highlighting Hegel's conceptual realism, Hoffmann focuses on an undervalued move in his dialectic: inversion (μεταβολή). From precursors in Kant the author validates the philosopher's claim in not supplying a completeness proof for his table of categories: it's easy! Hoffmann shows how his new approach works on Hegel's central terms–paradigmatically language and individuality–in detailed analytical work through the two great masterpieces: Phenomenology and Objective Logic. From consciousness inversion at the start of the former to the modalities and subjectivity of substance at the end of the latter, Hoffmann develops Hegel's epochal conceptual realism and metabolic dialectic as keys to substantiating the philosopher's claim for his Logic: it is indeed the science of absolute form!
Addresses of the Mississippi Philosophical Association is a collection of presidential and invited addresses from the members of the Mississippi Philosophical Association (MPA). Papers date from the inception of the association in the mid-1940s and continue through 1999. The common thread in these addresses is the authors' service to or leadership in the MPA. The content and methods in the chapters are diverse, including addresses on ethics, political philosophy, history of philosophy, epistemology, aesthetics, philosophy of language, philosophy of religion, philosophy of science, and philosophical theology. Some unique features of this book are a history of the MPA, biographical sketches and photographs of each contributor, and the inclusion of the unpublished 1988 Dunbar Lectures from Millsaps College and the unpublished 1992 Akin Lecture from Mississippi College. These essays and lectures reveal the vitality of philosophy in the colleges and universities of Mississippi. As part of the special series, Histories and Addresses of Philosophical Societies in the larger Value Inquiry Book Series, this book documents - in a unique historical format - the value and vitality of a state philosophical organization.
“There has been no attempt to mold these addresses into a unity; rather, the addresses offer a glimpse of the pluralistic philosophical reflection among the philosophical faculties of the private colleges and public universities in the state of Mississippi. To the surprise of some people, philosophy is alive, well, diverse, and flourishing in Mississippi!” (from the Preface).
Author: Leonhard Praeg
As academic subject African philosophy is predominantly concerned with epistemology. It aims at re-presenting a lost body of authentic African thought. This apparently austere a-historical concern is framed by a grand narrative of liberation that cannot but politicise the quest for epistemological autonomy. By “politicise” I mean that the desire to re-cover an authentic African epistemology in order to establish African philosophy as autonomous subject, ironically re-iterates Western, enlightenment notions of the autonomous subject. Here, in the pursuit of an autonomous subject the terms of historical oppression are necessarily duplicated in the terms of liberation. In this study I use the term disfigurement to refer to the double-bind - peculiar to post-coloniality - in which the African subject finds itself when it has to establish and affirm a sense of apartheid (in order to confirm the assumption of difference) by inventing its own autonomy in a way that ironically conflicts with an African conception of the autonomous subject. The transcendental concern with epistemological authenticity and autonomy - indicative of an oppressive desire for Western style autonomy - necessary as it may be in a post-colonial context, is placed in an ethical framework that seeks to remain faithful to the African dictum of identity and autonomy “I am because we are”. Whereas the first three chapters are concerned with the transcendental question ‘what is African philosophy?’, the fourth and last chapter situates the ethical framework within which this question arises in the context of the recently “completed” South African Truth and Reconciliation Commission.
Race, Culture, and the Education of African American Adults. Second Edition
This book fills a void in the scholarly treatment of Alain Locke by providing the reader with a comprehensive view of Locke’s vision of mass, and adult, education as instruments for social change. It is representative of the remarkable optimistic manifesto of 1925 in which the “New Negro,” by virtue of a cosmopolitan education emphasizing value pluralism, would become a full participant in American culture. This text delineates Locke’s crucial contribution to the philosophy of adult education and provides insights into how he expected others to use his aesthetic, literary, and anthropological theories as instruments for social and political transformation.
Geschichts- und Lebensbilder werden im allgemeinen von Historikern aufgrund verschiedenartiger Quellen entworfen. In seltenen Fällen übernehmen es jene, die Geschichte machen, selbst, über Jahrzehnte ihr Leben und ihre Zeit zu dokumentieren. Die weitgehend erhaltene Korrespondenz zwischen dem Philosophen Alexius Meinong (1853-1920) und dem Musikwissenschaftler Guido Adler (1855-1941) ist ein solcher Glücksfall. Sie spiegelt die Lebensgeschichte der beiden Freunde im Kontext der Gesamtgeschichte. Der umfangreiche Briefwechsel ist aber weit mehr als eine eindrucksvolle Schilderung des bloß persönlichen Werdeganges von Meinong und Adler. Denn hier wird ein faszinierendes Kapitel Universitäts- und Wissenschaftsgeschichte aufgeschlagen. Private und politische Intrigen, philosophische Schulenkämpfe, Berufungsdebatten, wie sie aus Akten- und Archivmaterial unvergleichlich weniger lebendig hervorgehen, erscheinen ebenso thematisiert wie wissenschaftliche Fragen. Denn eine Stütze der Freundschaft war das große Interesse, welches die beiden dem Fach des anderen entgegenbrachten - Vorbedingung für ein erfolgreiches Streben nach Interdisziplinarität.
Author: Gregory Elliott
First published in 1987, Althusser, The Detour of Theory was widely received as the fullest account of its subject to date. Drawing on a wide range of hitherto untranslated material, it examined the political and intellectual contexts of Althusser’s ‘return to Marx’ in the mid-1960s; analysed the novel character of the Marxism developed in his major works; charted their author’s subsequent evolution, from his self-criticism to the proclamation of a ‘crisis of Marxism’; and concluded with a balance-sheet of Althusser’s contribution to historical materialism.
For this second edition, Gregory Elliott has added a substantial postscript in which he surveys the posthumous edition of the French philosopher’s work published in the 1990s, from the early writings of the 1940s through to the late texts of the 1980s, relating the unknown Althusser revealed by them to the familiar figure of For Marx and Reading Capital, together with a comprehensive bibliography of Althusser’s oeuvre.
Volume Editors: Leila Haaparanta and Ilkka Niiniluoto
Finland is internationally known as one of the leading centers of twentieth century analytic philosophy. This volume offers for the first time an overall survey of the Finnish analytic school. The rise of this trend is illustrated by original articles of Edward Westermarck, Eino Kaila, Georg Henrik von Wright, and Jaakko Hintikka. Contributions of Finnish philosophers are then systematically discussed in the fields of logic, philosophy of language, philosophy of science, history of philosophy, ethics and social philosophy. Metaphilosophical reflections on the nature of philosophy are highlighted by the Finnish dialogue between analytic philosophy, phenomenology, pragmatism, and critical theory.