Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 69 items for :

  • Biblical Studies x
  • Church History x
Clear All
Introduction, Translation and Commentary
Author: Anna M. Silvas
This book gathers 37 letters of St Gregory of Nyssa (c. 335-394), translated into English, some for the first time, and equipped with up-to-date scholarly notes.
It begins with a biography focusing on Gregory’s family background and young adulthood. A study of Gregory the letter writer follows, with a dateline of the letters. Three sub-collections of letters follow: 1. ‘Prelude’ comprising testimonia from Basil and Gregory Nazianzen, 2. ‘The Pasquali Collection’, the 30 letters established by G. Pasquali, 3. ‘Supplementary’, one letter always known as Gregory’s, five letters reassigned to Gregory by scholars, and a new one proposed by the author for reassignment. A specially commissioned icon, an original map, and two architectural sketches are included.
This book will both stimulate veteran scholars in the Cappadocian Fathers and early Christianity, and serve English speaking lovers of the Fathers who do not have ready access to the sources in other languages.
Author: Anna M. Silvas
Basil of Caesarea (c. 328-378) was the great father of Christian monasticism in eastern Anatolia, whose influence spread into all the Greek, Latin and Syriac speaking churches. Basil’s counsels for ascetics in community are collected in his Asketikon. The earliest version, the Small Asketikon, did not survive in the Greek, but only in a Latin translation ( The Rule of Basil), and in a Syriac translation ( The Questions of the Brothers). Silvas presents the first ever edition of the entire Syriac translation, drawn from five manuscripts, the oldest from the late 5th century. The introductory study shows how the Syriac translator was himself a warm-hearted spiritual father who made his own authorial contributions to the Questions of the Brothers.
Memorial Volume for the 125th Anniversary of Shalva Nutsubidze (1888-1969)
The volume contains contributions dedicated to the person and the work of Shalva Nutsubidze and his scholarly interests: the Christian Orient from the fifth to the seventh century, the Georgian eleventh century, the Neoplatonic philosopher Ioane Petritsi and his epoch and Shota Rustaveli and mediaeval Georgian culture. Among the articles are a new edition and translation of the original Georgian author’s Preface to the lost Commentary on the Psalms by Ioane Petritsi and the editio princeps with an English translation of an epistle of Nicetas Stethatos (eleventh century), whose Greek original is lost.

The traditions of Georgian mediaeval thought are considered in their historical context within the Byzantine Commonwealth and are traced in both philosophy and poetry.
Editors: Geoffrey Dunn and Wendy Mayer
The essays collected in Christians Shaping Identity celebrate Pauline Allen’s significant contribution to early Christian, late antique, and Byzantine studies, especially concerning bishops, heresy/orthodoxy and christology. Covering the period from earliest Christianity to middle Byzantium, the first eighteen essays explore the varied ways in which Christians constructed their own identity and that of the society around them. A final four essays explore the same theme within Roman Catholicism and oriental Christianity in the late 19th to 21st centuries, with particular attention to the subtle relationships between the shaping of the early Christian past and the moulding of Christian identity today. Among the many leading scholars represented are Averil Cameron and Elizabeth A. Clark.
Author: Jackson Lashier
In Irenaeus on the Trinity, Jackson Lashier provides a fresh reading of Irenaeus' understanding of God, in dialogue with his opponents and sources, which reveals a more developed Trinitarian theology than traditionally thought. Key Trinitarian themes that emerge are the Fatherhood of God, the mutual indwelling relations of Father, Son, and Spirit, and the cooperative divine work of all three in the economy. The study finds Irenaeus' thought to depart in these areas from standard second century trajectories--Apologists and Gnostics--moving Trinitarian theology in the direction of more developed Trinitarian thought of later centuries. This monograph offers not only a better understanding of Irenaeus' thought, but also a fuller picture of the development of Trinitarian thought in early Christianity.
Author: Nestor Kavvadas
Isaac of Nineveh (7th century AD), or Isaac the Syrian, was, among all the Syriac writers, the one to exert the greatest influence outside the Syriac-speaking world, becoming a highly venerated Father of Byzantine Orthodox spirituality and theology. In Isaak von Nineve und seine Kephalaia Gnostika, Nestor Kavvadas first draws out the frictions between East Syrian episcopacy and the anchorite mystical movement as represented by Isaac, in search of the historical context of Isaac’s teaching on the working of the Holy Spirit on the monk. Then, he draws out of Isaac’s writings, and especially the Kephalaia Gnostika, the underlying structure of Isaac’s thought on the working of the Holy Spirit, with the tension here between the here and now and the ‘New World’ that can be momentarily anticipated in the present world.

Isaak von Ninive (7. Jh. n.Chr.), oder Isaak der Syrer, war unter allen Syrischen Autoren derjenige, der den größten Einfluss außerhalb der syrischsprachigen Welt ausübte, indem er ein besonders verehrter Vater der byzantinischen orthodoxen Spiritualität und Theologie wurde. In Isaak von Ninive und seine Kephalaia Gnostika zeichnet Nestor Kavvadas zuerst die Reibungen zwischen dem ostsyrischen Episkopat und der v.a. durch Isaak vertretenen, anachoretischen mystischen Strömung nach, auf der Suche nach dem historischen Kontext der Lehre Isaaks vom Wirken des Heiligen Geistes auf den Mönch. Dann rekonstruiert er aus den Schriften Isaaks, insbesondere aus den Kephalaia Gnostika, die Isaaks Denken vom Wirken des Heiligen Geistes zugrundeliegende Struktur; leitend ist hier die Spannung zwischen dem „hier und jetzt“ und der „Neuen Welt“, die in dieser Welt augenblicklich antizipiert werden kann.
Author: Ellen Scully
In Physicalist Soteriology in Hilary of Poitiers, Ellen Scully presents Hilary as a representative of the “mystical” or “physical” trajectory of patristic soteriology most often associated with the Greek fathers. Scully shows that Hilary’s physicalism is unique, both in its Latin non-Platonic provenance and its conceptual foundation, namely that the incarnation has salvific effects for all humanity because Christ’s body contains every human individual.

Hilary’s soteriological conviction that all humans are present in Christ’s body has theological ramifications that expand beyond soteriology to include christology, eschatology, ecclesiology, and Trinitarian theology. In detailing these ramifications, Scully illumines the pervasive centrality of physicalism in Hilary’s theology while correcting standard soteriological presentations of physicalism as an exclusively Greek phenomenon.

Studien zum Glaubensabfall in altkirchlicher Theologie, Disziplin und Pastoral (4.-7. Jahrhundert n. Chr.)
In diesem Band untersucht Christian Hornung den Glaubensabfall im spätantiken Christentum. Im Anschluss an eine umfangreiche Hinführung, in der die Apostasie in der nichtchristlichen Umwelt behandelt wird, nähert er sich dem Thema unter drei Perspektiven: Theologie, Disziplin und Pastoral. Analysiert werden theologische Erklärungsmodelle des Phänomens bei kirchlichen Autoren, seine disziplinäre Einordnung im spätantiken (Kirchen-)Recht sowie der konkrete Umgang mit Apostaten in städtischen Gemeinden.
Im Gegensatz zur bisherigen altertumswissenschaftlichen Forschung kann Hornung aufzeigen, dass die Apostasie bis weit in nachkonstantinische Zeit eine grundlegende Anfrage an das sich etablierende Christentum bleibt. Die Anlage der Arbeit erlaubt zudem neue Einblicke in das Verhältnis von altkirchlichem Recht und Pastoral.

In this volume, Christian Hornung examines the abandonment of faith in the Christianity of Late Antiquity. After an extensive introduction dealing with apostasy in the non-Christian world he approaches the subject from three perspectives: theology, church discipline and pastoral care. Hornung analyses the theological explanatory models of different ecclesiastical writers concerning apostasy, early (Canon) Law and concrete examples of apostates in urban parishes.
In contrast with prior classical and patristic scholarship, he points out that apostasy remains a fundamental problem for Christianity in the time after Constantine the Great. Furthermore, the special composition of Hornung’s work delivers new insights into the relationship between early Canon Law and pastoral care.
This collection of essays—the ninth volume in Brill’s Pauline Studies series—features Paul and his relationship to knowledge. Gnosis, the Greek word generally translated as "knowledge," is broadly interpreted, and the essays contained in this volume revolve around both a more general notion of knowledge in relation to Paul and more specific references to Gnosticism. Several of these essays discuss Paul’s use of "knowledge" words, Paul’s knowledge and understanding of key themes and ideas in his writings, Paul’s interpreters in light of gnostics like Valentinus and Marcion, and Gnosticism in light of Paul’s letters. This collection of essays exposes the reader to crucial topics regarding Paul and Gnosis that are not readily addressed elsewhere.
The studies collected in Preaching after Easter examine the festal history and homiletics of Mid-Pentecost, Ascension, and Pentecost in the late antique Mediterranean world. Articles on individual sermons or the work of individual preachers such as John Chrysostom, Augustine of Hippo, Peter Chrysologus, Leo the Great, and Severus of Antioch exhibit the richness of late antique festal preaching. Questions of authenticity, heresiology, and theological, exegetical, or liturgical history are addressed with methodological rigor. Complementary contributions that deal with ancient Jewish-Christian dialogue, art-historical reception, and contemporary liturgical theology illustrate the wide ramifications of ancient Christian festal practice. Students and scholars of these feasts and the interpretive traditions devoted to them will find this volume to be an indispensable source of information and analysis.