Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 62 items for :

  • Ancient Judaism x
  • Reference Work x
  • Text Edition x
  • Encyclopedia x
  • Biblical Interpretations x
Clear All Modify Search
Uses of the Names Jew, Hebrew and Israel in Ancient Jewish and Early Christian Literature
Author: Harvey
Many studies have portrayed Judaism in Antiquity as sectarian, with a variety of groups all claiming to be The True Israel. Early Christianity is alleged to have begun in this context as one more Jewish sect claiming such authority. However, the second-century Christian Justin Martyr is the first person known to have used the phrase 'the True Israel'.
This book examines the uses of the names 'Jew', 'Hebrew' and 'Israel' in the surviving literature - especially the Bible, Dead Sea Scrolls, Philo, Josephus, New Testament and Mishnah - to determine whether this is an adequate or accurate picture. It discusses the associations of each word, as determined by their actual usage and collocations rather than their theoretical origins.
It will be of value to scholars of ancient Judaism and early Christianity.

This publication has also been published in paperback, please click here for details.
Author: Johann Cook
A new association for the study of the Septuagint was formed in South Africa recently. The present collection is a compilation of papers delivered at the first conference of this association, as well as other contributions. The volume addresses issues touching on the Septuagint in the broad sense of the word. This includes the Old Greek text (Daniel, Proverbs, Psalms and Lamentations) as well as the reception of the LXX (NT, Augustine and Jerome, etc.). A few contributions that may be regarded as miscellanea are nevertheless related to matters Septuagintal (Aristeas, Peshitta, Eunochos).
A Commentary based on Hosea in Codex Vaticanus
Rather than studying the LXX of Hosea mainly as a text-critical resource for the Hebrew or as a help for interpreting the Hebrew, this commentary, as part of the Septuagint Commentary Series, primarily examines the Greek text of Hosea as an artifact in its own right to seek to determine how it would have been understood by early Greek readers who were unfamiliar with the Hebrew. This commentary is based on the uncorrected text of Vaticanus, and it contains a copy of that text with notes discussing readings that differ from modern editions of the LXX along with a literal translation of that text. This commentary also has an introduction to the Minor Prophets in the Septuagint. It is relevant for anyone studying the LXX or the book of Hosea.
Authors: Albert Geljon and D.T. Runia
The Jewish exegete and philosopher Philo of Alexandria has long been famous for his allegorical treatises on the Greek Bible. The present volume contains the first translation and commentary in English on his treatise De agricultura ( On cultivation), which gives an elaborate allegorical interpretation of Genesis 9:20. Noah’s role as a cultivator is analysed in terms of the ethical and spiritual quest of the soul making progress towards its goal. The translation renders Philo’s baroque Greek into readable modern English. The commentary pays particular attention to the treatise’s structure, its biblical basis and its exegetical and philosophical contents. The volume will be valuable for the insights it gives into an unusual but highly influential method of biblical interpretation.
In Revelation 21-22 in Light of Jewish and Greco-Roman Utopianism, Eric J. Gilchrest offers a creative and compelling reading of Revelation 21-22 as understood through the lens of ancient utopianism. The work is in two parts beginning with a detailed portrait of ancient utopianism based on Greco-Roman and Jewish traditions. The portrait sketches the “topography” of the utopian landscape, which includes a thorough account of various traditions using fourteen utopian topoi or motifs.

The author then moves to a description of Revelation’s new Jerusalem in light of these two utopian traditions. With sensitivity to how this text would have been read by each utopian perspective, the author constructs a unique reading of a classic passage that highlights the variety of ways the text originally may have been heard.
The Scriptures of Israel in Jewish and Christian Tradition is a collection of studies in honour of Professor Maarten J.J. Menken (Tilburg/Utrecht) and illustrates the rich diversity of approaches to biblical interpretation at the beginning of the Common Era. An international team of specialists share their insights on such topics as the availability of Hebrew, Aramaic and Greek texts, Jewish and Christian hermeneutics, notions of authority and inspiration and even a study of inscriptions. Each in its own way demonstrates that the relationship between text and tradition, culture and belief is always complex.
Text-critical and Hermeneutical Studies in the Septuagint is the title of a bilateral research project conducted from 2009 to 2011 by scholars from the universities of Munich (Germany) and Stellenbosch (South Africa). The joint research enterprise was rounded off by a conference that took place from 31st of August – 2nd of September 2011 in Stellenbosch. It was held in cooperation with the Association for the Study of the Septuagint in South Africa (LXXSA). Scholars from Germany, the Netherlands, Ireland, Belgium, France, Canada and the USA, as well as South Africa, delivered papers focusing on the history of the LXX; translation technique and text history; textual criticism, and the reception of the Septuagint.
A Commentary based on Amos in Codex Vaticanus
In this commentary W. Edward Glenny provides a careful analysis of the Greek text and literary features of Amos based on its witness in the fourth century codex Vaticanus. The commentary begins with an introduction to Amos in Vaticanus, and it contains an uncorrected copy of Amos from Vaticanus with textual notes and a literal translation of that text. In keeping with the purpose of Brill’s Septuagint Commentary Series Glenny seeks to interpret the Greek text of Amos as an artifact in its own right in order to determine how early Greek readers who were unfamiliar with the Hebrew would have understood it.
Actes du colloque international tenu en Sorbonne, à Paris, les 8 et 9 juin 2010
Les termes « messie » et « messianisme » recouvrent aujourd’hui une désignation exagérément large au regard de leur sens initial dans le judaïsme et le christianisme. Ils sont utilisés dans des contextes qui empruntent souvent inconsciemment aux modèles rhétoriques à l’oeuvre dans le judaïsme ancien et dans le christianisme primitif. Le livre s’intéresse à ces modèles qui caractérisent l’histoire intellectuelle du premier messianisme juif. Tout d’abord, l’émergence du messianisme est examinée à travers les modèles de divinisation du roi dans le Proche-Orient ancien (Égypte, Mésopotamie, culture cananéenne), et à travers l’évolution de l’idéologie royale dans l’Israël ancien. D'autre part, les premiers textes chrétiens ont mis en avant la fusion des attentes messianiques en une seule figure de messie (Jésus-Christ), mais la pluralité des figures messianiques semble prévaloir dans la littérature juive ancienne.

____________________________________

The words ‘messiah’ and ‘messianism’ are presently used in a too wide significance in comparison with their original meaning in Judaism and
Christianity. Nevertheless, they often borrow unconsciously from rhetorical models at work in Ancient Judaism and Christianity. The book constitutes a series of studies on these models which characterize the intellectual history of the first Jewish messianism. Firstly, the birth of messianism is studied across the divinization of kings in Ancient Near East (Egypt, Mesopotamia, Canaanite culture) and secondly, the change of royal ideology in Ancient Israel to messianism. Thirdly, the first Christian texts have promoted the merging of messianic expectations in one messianic figure (Jesus-Christ), but the plurality of messiahs seem to prevail in early Jewish literature.
The relationships between Pauline literature and the Dead Sea scrolls have fascinated specialists ever since the latter were first discovered. Now that all the Qumran scrolls have been published, it is possible to see more clearly the amplitude and impact of this corpus on first century Judaism. This book offers some syntheses of the results obtained in the last decades, and also opens up new perspectives, by highlighting similarities and indicating possible relationships between these various writings within Mediterranean Judaism. In addition, the authors wish to show how certain traditions spread, evolve and are reconfigured in ancient Judaism as they meet new religious, cultural and social challenges.